sliding drop outs and lock washers or not?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,367

    sliding drop outs and lock washers or not?

    Just wanted to ask how many of you saw the need to add some sort of locking washer under the bolt heads on your sliding drop outs. I haven't personally but have wondered if they are something that may have a tendancy to work loose over time or not.

    Name:  952416d1420319398t-my-new-ss-project-starts-today-14203185875140.jpg
Views: 1261
Size:  42.9 KB

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thickfog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,269
    You'll be fine. Have two bikes with sliders and no issues albeit they need to be tight!
    CRAMBA Chairman

  3. #3
    SCRUBDUNKER
    Reputation: razardica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    301
    I have never used lock washers. I put a single drop of each blue threadlocker on each bolt though.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,367
    Quote Originally Posted by razardica View Post
    I have never used lock washers. I put a single drop of each blue threadlocker on each bolt though.
    I would do that except I am running 2 cogs and I switch from one to the other depending on my ride so I need to be able to move my sliders when needed.

    Name:  996351d1434508704t-heres-my-dinglespeed-works-14345083995440.jpg
Views: 666
Size:  50.2 KB

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thickfog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,269
    Ahh. Very cool setup.

    No need for loctite. The bolts themselves should not be coming loose if properly tightened.
    These type of sliders are very problem free. Enjoy.
    CRAMBA Chairman

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,367
    I haven't had any issues with them coming loose.......yet. That's why I asked cause I wasn't sure if it would happen someday and catch me off guard lol.

  7. #7
    Clyde on a mission!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    719
    I use a torque wrench for every place where more than one bolt is sharing a load, for example on the 4 bolts that holds the bar to the stem, the 2 bolts that hold the stem to the fork and so on and also on the two bolts on each side holding my sliding dropout in place. It doesn't really matter how much torque as long as you don't overdo it and as long as all the bolts working together gets the same torque.

    I've got one of these https://www.louis.eu/artikel/prof-mi...?list=44647840 which has a 3-15 Nm range that works very well for a bike.

    You could just tighten the bolts by feel, I do that with single bolts, for example the bolt holding my brake grip and so on, but when multiple bolts are involved you'll end up with the one tightened the most doing all the work while the others tends to work themselves lose over time. Use a torque wrench and the all share the load evenly and stay nice and tight.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,367
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandrenseren View Post
    I use a torque wrench for every place where more than one bolt is sharing a load, for example on the 4 bolts that holds the bar to the stem, the 2 bolts that hold the stem to the fork and so on and also on the two bolts on each side holding my sliding dropout in place. It doesn't really matter how much torque as long as you don't overdo it and as long as all the bolts working together gets the same torque.

    I've got one of these https://www.louis.eu/artikel/prof-mi...?list=44647840 which has a 3-15 Nm range that works very well for a bike.

    You could just tighten the bolts by feel, I do that with single bolts, for example the bolt holding my brake grip and so on, but when multiple bolts are involved you'll end up with the one tightened the most doing all the work while the others tends to work themselves lose over time. Use a torque wrench and the all share the load evenly and stay nice and tight.
    Good advice. I was just telling a friend of mine today, as he was re ringing his golf cart motor , that equal torque was really more important than the exact torque value.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,805
    from Paragon Machine Works, regarding their sliding dropouts, which are essentially what is on most frames like that:

    Quote Originally Posted by PMW
    The official torque specifications for our M8 x 18 (sliding dropouts) and M8
    x 16 (Rocker dropouts) steel bolts are 24 to 26 N-m, 2.4 to 2.6 Kg-m, or 17
    to 19 foot pounds. A word of caution: unless you have a brand new 5 mm
    wrench, at the upper range of these values there is a possibility of rounding
    out the socket head on a steel bolt. This isn't the case with our titanium
    bolts that can be torqued at least 10% more than the above values. Always
    use our 304 stainless steel washers with the bolts; they spread the load
    over a larger area, hold the parts together better, and keep your frame from
    getting damaged from repeated tightening and loosening of the bolts.
    https://www.paragonmachineworks.com/...djDrops(1).pdf

  10. #10
    Clyde on a mission!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    719
    24 to 26 Nm is quite a lot, I've been tightening the bolts holding the sliding dropout on my Kona Unit at 11-13 Nm and they never moved.

    My procedure for tightening the chain on my Unit:

    1) I loosen the bolts and the adjuster screws on both sides.
    2) I tighten the adjuster screw on the drive side until the chain is nice and tight, then dial it back a little to give a bit of slack in the chain.
    3) I tighten the adjuster screw on the non-drive side until the wheel is nice and centered between the chain stays near the bottom bracket.
    4) I set my torque wrench somewhere between 11 and 13 Nm, doesn't really matter if it's 11.2 or 12.6, just in the 11-13 ball park.
    5) I tighten all 4 bolts holding the sliding dropouts at the same torque.
    6) I check that the wheel is still nice and centered.
    7) I lock the adjuster screws with the nut.

    24-26 Nm seems quite excessive, never had any issues with using half that.

  11. #11
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,807
    i reef on the slider bolts as hard as i can and have never had any issues. at all.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    11,543
    Always
    use our 304 stainless steel washers with the bolts; they spread the load
    over a larger area, hold the parts together better, and keep your frame from
    getting damaged from repeated tightening and loosening of the bolts.
    ^Sound advice IMO, they may work without them but washers (not split lock washers) make everything better.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,367
    When I switch to my 18 tooth smaller cog, I do not bother to screw my adjuster bolts in to compensate for the slider moving rearward. I leave them locked down and just pull the tire back centered by hand and tighten the slider bolts down. Then when I move back to the 20 tooth cog, the sliders fall right back against the adjuster bolts where I have them set at.

  14. #14
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,807
    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    When I switch to my 18 tooth smaller cog, I do not bother to screw my adjuster bolts in to compensate for the slider moving rearward. I leave them locked down and just pull the tire back centered by hand and tighten the slider bolts down. Then when I move back to the 20 tooth cog, the sliders fall right back against the adjuster bolts where I have them set at.
    sounds like a lot of work...............for a "singlespeed"

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Feldybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    888
    I swapped out the button head cap screws (5mm hex) for socket head cap screws (6mm) hex. No rounding problems and cheaper than the Paragon Ti bolt option. I also use lock washers as extra insurance.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,367
    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    sounds like a lot of work...............for a "singlespeed"
    LOL! The only reason I did that is so I can use the 18 tooth cog when I ride urban stuff and also to get my legs stronger. When I go off road (which it has been too long) I use the 20 tooth.

Similar Threads

  1. sliding drop outs and wheel centering
    By iowamtb in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-29-2015, 09:25 PM
  2. Caliper alignment - Anyone use lock washers?
    By Sablotny in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-16-2014, 02:36 PM
  3. A little advice on sliding rear drop outs...
    By Magnum Ti in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-06-2013, 08:30 PM
  4. EBB vs Sliding drop outs
    By head in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-12-2011, 08:35 AM
  5. Conversion drop-outs
    By Hurricane Jeff in forum 27.5
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-15-2011, 11:49 AM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.