• 02-01-2011
    Godless Communist
    Sliders, disc, and wheel removal?
    I know I'll figure this out myself when my bike gets finished, but while I'm waiting I'm curious: how does one remove the rear wheel on a sliding-dropout singlespeed with a disc brake? MC Flite 29er with Avid BB5 (soon to be BB7), to be specific.

    I'm hoping someone will tell me that you just unbolt the wheel and it drops out without having to jack with the caliper or the sliders, but I figure you've got to somehow drop the chain first...

    Enlighten me, please?
  • 02-01-2011
    MrBaker
    Exactly the same way you remove a wheel from a vertical wheel. Except you don't have to mess with all the derailleur BS.
  • 02-01-2011
    csteven71
    On my track bike I loosen the nuts, slide the wheel foward in the drops to loosen tension, remove the chain from the front chainring and then it comes off the cog with no problem. I do the opposite for instillation.
  • 02-01-2011
    Godless Communist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zippinveedub
    On my track bike I loosen the nuts, slide the wheel foward in the drops to loosen tension, remove the chain from the front chainring and then it comes off the cog with no problem. I do the opposite for instillation.


    Thanks, but this isn't a track bike with track-ends. It's got sliders, vertical dropouts, and a disc brake:



    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MrBaker
    Exactly the same way you remove a wheel from a vertical wheel. Except you don't have to mess with all the derailleur BS.

    But the derailleur provides some necessary chain slack. Won't I have to push the sliders forward a little first? I hope I'm wrong...
  • 02-01-2011
    csteven71
    Sorry, I'm jacked up on coffee doing homework and failed to read, I'd imagine it just will drop straight out. I don't see anything that should stop it from doing that unless the chain is absurdly tight.
  • 02-01-2011
    Raybum
    Yep, super easy with sliders. Just undo the quick release and the wheel drops right out. No messing with brakes, or anything.
  • 02-01-2011
    Godless Communist
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zippinveedub
    Sorry, I'm jacked up on coffee doing homework and failed to read, I'd imagine it just will drop straight out. I don't see anything that should stop it from doing that unless the chain is absurdly tight.

    Yeah, right -- "doing homework" ... :p Thanks for checking back in, though -- I suspect you're right about this.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Raybum
    Just undo the quick release and the wheel drops right out. No messing with brakes, or anything.

    Music to my ears, Ray. Wow - I can't believe I'll be able to use QRs again! It's been years...
  • 02-01-2011
    csteven71
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Godless Communist
    Yeah, right -- "doing homework" ... :p Thanks for checking back in, though -- I suspect you're right about this.



    Well I'm doing materials science stuff so I'm kinda doing work by being on the ss forums, you know learning about different metals (steel vs aluminium), how materials handle stress (carbon fiber vs steel fork), the way a steel frame deforms under load, its all relevant, right? ;)
  • 02-02-2011
    Stevob
    Sorry, but it just has to be asked.

  • 02-02-2011
    Andy R
    That's an Alfine hub - there're acorn nuts ;)
  • 02-02-2011
    umarth
    You shoulda tacked this onto your other thread. Anywho, what you do, mid ride, is to open your quick release. After a couple bumps, you'll know how easy sliders will drop your rear wheel.

    The only issue with sliders on the MCF that I have is that switching tires and ratios takes longer than I have to give.
  • 02-02-2011
    Stevob
    I'm still none the wiser. That ain't no nut the arrow's pointing to. Looks like an extra brace above the chainstay, but where does it go to?
  • 02-02-2011
    umarth
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Stevob
    I'm still none the wiser. That ain't no nut the arrow's pointing to. Looks like an extra brace above the chainstay, but where does it go to?

    I am going to guess Swobo Baxter for the bike, the extra brace is a chainguard, painted to match the frame. But I'm no swobo expert....
  • 02-02-2011
    Stevob
    I'll pay that
  • 02-02-2011
    1SPD
    Uh yes, that is a chain guard! Its an internally geared hub (you can see the cable running along the far chainstay) so I am guessing it is a hybrid bike or something retro so it has a chainguard on it. I will also add that it is a cheap one judging by the lack of a QR on the rear wheel. Totally defeats the whole idea of having sliders imo though!
  • 02-02-2011
    Godless Communist
    FWIW, I pasted that photo from a Google search to illustrate to another member what the sliders were all about. It was the only pic I could find that showed both the sliders and the disc brake.
  • 02-02-2011
    Andy R
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by 1SPD
    I am guessing it is a hybrid bike or something retro so it has a chainguard on it. I will also add that it is a cheap one judging by the lack of a QR on the rear wheel. Totally defeats the whole idea of having sliders imo though!

    It's an Alfine hub, I think - you can't use a QR with them anyway, as they have a solid axle.
    It's still just one spanner turn each side and the wheel's out - it takes longer to faff around with the shifter cable.

    Although there are nicer nuts that you could use than those Shimano acorn nuts.
  • 02-02-2011
    Stevob
    Chain guard is rather obvious now. I suppose that I wasn't really expecting to see one on a MTB. But like OP said, it's just a pic, not his.