Singlespeed only shop.- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    25

    Singlespeed only shop.

    I've started an online retail shop for everything singlespeed. It will be called 1speeddrive.com.
    We will be carrying frames, forks and components from companies, big and small, that manufacture singlespeed products. We will also have fixed gear and cyclocross gear.

    Not only will the site be a retail location, we will also conduct interveiws with builders and riders, offer tech advice, products reveiws, polls and all other kinds of singlespeed content.

    The reason I'm posting (other than getting the word out) is to ask what the readers would like to see in a singlespeed/ fixie/ cyclocross wesite.

    Thanks for your help,

    Jeff
    1speeddrive.com
    [email protected]
    Last edited by 1SPEEDDRIVE; 11-20-2004 at 07:30 PM. Reason: .

  2. #2
    Bikes not Bombs.....
    Reputation: SS Jerry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    508

    Now that you have asked.....

    Interviews with people that actually use the products, not the manufacturers.

    No opinons expressed by a member of management that has never sat on the bike, pedaled the product or turned a wrench on the part.

    Actual data on the fatique, or life span of a product.

    Options. what is actually available now, in stock ready to sell to the public, not a laundry list of what will or may be available, maybe, at a later date.

    Weigh each part on a scale that is certified. Do not con the public into believing that the part is lighter or stronger that its reality.

    Cutting edge info.... not spinning the same old crap that we read in other mags or on other webs.

    Tours of the places where parts are made. Lends credibilty to the part when we spend our money.

    List of names...... places..... part numbers..... real life info, not the black book crap.

    Who is the driving force behind the industry, not big corps, but the innovative people who actually invent the part.

    Overseas stuff, what are those guys across the ponds doing?????

    Maybe a few race results and interviews with the winners and losers. Heck, they paid their entry fee, lets hear it from them also, they might have something to say......

    WHAT EVER MBA IS DOING..... DONT DO IT.

    These are just a few of my thoughts..... you really don't want to know the rest.....

    -JS-
    Last edited by SS Jerry; 11-20-2004 at 08:15 PM. Reason: spelling errors
    Thanks to all of you for your friendships on this board..... -

  3. #3
    Where's Toto?
    Reputation: endure26's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,188
    Parts in stock - not "jeez those guys at ________ still haven't shipped it to us". If it's going to take 3 weeks to get it then be honest and tell me so. If the suppliers aren't coming through for you then tell me up front or quit carrying their products.

    If you're doing a website, then advertising from bicycle rider oriented companies. Ever look at Outside magazine. Used to be a pretty good rag. Environmentally conscious etc. Now all they do is stick you with ads for Hummers and Gucci. Dirt Rag has a pretty good philosophy in this regard.

    Actual, honest tests from people that ride a product and give it a thorough workout. I'm tired of hearing nothing but positive comments on everything that gets tested. Equally tired of seeing a regurgitation of the same product dribble posted on the manufacturer's website. Surely it's not all good.

    Reasonable prices. I'm not some know nothing consumer walking into my LBS. I worked my way through college managing a bike shop. I've built up every bike I own, including the wheels. When I buy something I've already done the research and I shop for best price. I generally don't need to be advised or sold on something. I typically find anywhere from a 10% to 50% price differential on most parts. Anymore, eBay is my favorite bike shop (at least the seller usually has the item in hand).

    I would suggest you not try to be all things to all people. The bike biz is tough. Road and comfort bikes are the top sellers right now. There are around 5-6k dealers in the US at any one time. About 1k go out of business each year and an equal number start up. Most dealers go into the biz because of a love of bikes as a hobby. This is a business. If you're prepared to run it as such, you will fail or at least have a very bumpy ride. Make sure you have clear goals and expectations. You won't get rich selling SS parts. If you're going for the niche, it's better to maintain and stock a smaller line of quality parts with a lower overhead, than trying to stock and/or order everything for everybody and create dissatisfied customers in the process. Selling online helps to overcome a lot of the overhead issues. Check out momovelo.com and wallbike.com ---- both kinda boutique-y shops aiming for niches. Don't know how they are doing, but they're still in business. Wallbike started online without a storefront. Speaking of which - many manufacturers will not sell to you without an established storefront and solid financials (FOX comes to mind) .

    Good luck!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tomacropod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    541
    probably won't be able to be a customer, but having seen many people attempt to convert their all-consuming love of bikes into a money-maker over the years, I implore you to keep it small and simple if you still want to love bikes in 10 years. Some manage to have it both ways, many burn out and lose their passion for bikes for the sake of their business. This is tragic to see and keeping yourself balanced is important.

    Of course, you may well have plenty experience in the bike industry, in which case I'm preaching to the choir :-)

    - Joel

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,540
    One thing thing that I have seen work well for shops in the past is to ally yourself wih a respected frame builder. And I mean ally to the point where you can call them at a moments notice for customer service etc. Make the frames a good deal and then make your money on parts and builds.

  6. #6
    .
    Reputation: frank n. beans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    804
    Good luck. Doesn't sound like the most profitable niche in cycling to me.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    25

    Thanks for your advice

    I was really asking in what type of products (manufacturers) and website context.

    I have extensive experience in the bike industry, from bike shops to component design and manufacturing. My last being founder and owner of Hurricane Components, in which I sold in July after licensing the company since 2002. I still do design and consulting for the new owners.

    At first, it will be tough to have all the stock on hand that every customer may order, but we will do our best to get products to the customer as soon as possible.
    We will offer competive pricing, we are not planning and cannot undercut other shops due to strict msrp's that manufacturers set. I will try my best to give the best prices possible though.

    We do have alot of personal contacts with frame builders and component manufacturers such as Kelly Bikes, Ventana, Curtlo, Truvativ, FSA, Answer, Marzocchi and Rockshox.

    I realise that singlespeeds are a "very niche" market and believe me, I not trying to "get rich". I feel that Im doing this as kind of a service to fellow singlespeeders, since I have alot of love for the singlespeed, and manufacturer and distributor contacts.

    Thanks again,

    Jeff
    1speeddrive.com

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tomacropod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    541
    cool then. I have a biased affection toward middleburn components, particularly the adaptability of their cranksets and their high quality chainrings. I don't know if you even have a US distributor for Middleburn stuff, but their UNO cranksets could be a real winner if you made them available to the US market.

    I already have a middleburn distributor, it's just a thought.

    - Joel

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by tomacropod
    cool then. I have a biased affection toward middleburn components, particularly the adaptability of their cranksets and their high quality chainrings. I don't know if you even have a US distributor for Middleburn stuff, but their UNO cranksets could be a real winner if you made them available to the US market.

    I already have a middleburn distributor, it's just a thought.

    - Joel
    Im trying to convince the new owners of Hurricane to start up making the Huricane Zeke cranks again. At the time we produced the crank, I had a design for a spider that had a build in chainguide (the cranks have a removable spider) for singlespeed applications.
    I have a few sets of the Zeke cranks on a couple of my bikes, including my singlespeeds.
    We have talked about even producing frames under the Hurricane name.

    As for Middleburn, I'm not sure they even are in the bike business anymore, they did make a very nice set of cranks though.

    Thanks,
    Jeff

  10. #10
    Where's Toto?
    Reputation: endure26's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,188

    Decisions, decisions...

    Re: What products to carry? I guess if I were undertaking this endeavor, I would look at each component that makes up a bike, decide what parts I wanted to carry, and then look across the spectrum of what's available at the various price points. For simplicity - low, medium, and high end. Within each price range, I would then look at components available and pick the best at that price. Eg hubs - Surly (low end), Spot? (medium), and CK? (high end). I wouldn't try to stock a bunch of sizes and/or colors - maybe only the most common if I did. However, when someone placed and order, I would let them know up front what my expected ETA was for the part. I would confirm that ETA with an email once I placed the order and had confirmation from the supplier.

    Re: Pricing. Some manufacturers use MSRP's and are very strict on selling below market. Not sure why we can't simply let capitalism prevail. I've seen some creative work-arounds. Speedgoat gives a free CK headset with many forks they sell. I've seen other places offer free shipping, socks, jerseys, or other "bonus" items with a purchase. Other sellers just cut the prices and say the hell with it.

    That said. Here's the challenge. Why should I order from you, when I can order from ________ who has the part in stock at a lower price? Local bike shops thrive on customer support and service/repair. Online, it's difficult to develop repoire with customers. Reputation? Maybe. Advertising? $$$ouch Word-o-mouth? Ok

    I always dreamed of opening a bike shop. As part of my Masters, I did a business plan. Wanted to do it on something I was interested in - figured OK let's just see if this bike shop thing would work. Wasn't real enthused with chances for success. Not in a position to do it right now anyway (I have another year and a half before I retire from Army). Doing something niche like the singlespeed thing and keeping it small scale, would be fun and a neat way to stay connected to the sport. You could always expand based on how well you do. You might want to check out the eBay storefront concept. I think a lot of retailers are starting to use eBay in that way. OK enough rambling.

Similar Threads

  1. Making a case to go singlespeed
    By SpinWheelz in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-09-2004, 09:29 AM
  2. shop guys- question for you..
    By kingkahuna in forum Washington
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-19-2004, 05:37 AM
  3. SS friendly bike shop in the Sacramento area?
    By jerms in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-28-2004, 08:57 AM
  4. Shop Ride from Old Dominion Brewery May 4th 6:15PM
    By JKC in forum Virginia, WV, Maryland, DC, Delaware
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-05-2004, 07:53 AM
  5. Looking for a good shop in Denver
    By NOLAwrench in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-27-2004, 07:19 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.