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  1. #1
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    SingleSpeed for New Riders

    Ok so i realize there might be some redundancy here and i hope i dont get 40 lashes though 38 i strangely find acceptable...so a little background first...I am new to mountain biking as in the last couple of months and yes the rock i made my home under is quite heavy. I am completely smitten with the sport though i currently suck but am getting better everyday. I have a hardtail giant yukon geared. So the question is this: after some research i really want to try a singlespeed. i am one who is out there for the exercise and being on the bike and trail. i often stop to just enjoy the view (and take a breath). is a singlespeed a good idea for a rank beginner?

  2. #2
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    I'm a shameless beginner as well. My first "real" bike was a rigid SS 29er (Dawes Deadeye) I purchased over the winter. I've been riding it since before the snow broke, and I absolutely love it. Singlespeed was challenging at first; everything I read on here applied. I had to get off and walk some places, I lost my cadence and momentum frequently and had some good little crashes as a result. However the result is I'm quickly becoming a stronger rider, the way the SS/rigid efficiently puts down power is addictive, especially climbing (especially climbing on group ride alongside a bunch of geared riders!).

    For myself I don't have any regrets. I should maybe include, after the first 2 ride I sprung for clipless pedals, which I was also new to, and found they REALLY expand the capabilities of the bike - or the rider I guess. In places where you lose momentum and need to really put down power, and on steep climbs, they are absolutely a game changer. I'd ridden on and off for years with flat pedals, and I felt like I needed to shout from the rooftops about them.

  3. #3
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    You may have to run lower gearing at first but when you are strong, you always try to ride harder so you can go for the higher gearing
    Spinnin' & Grinnin'

  4. #4
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    Do it..... Do it..... You'll find one gear is all you need

  5. #5
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    Mind your own religion.

  6. #6
    habitual line-stepper
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    i think a SS is a great 2nd bike to have. when i've been off the saddle for a while, i punish myself with the SS. when i want to squeeze in a quick ride, i grab the SS. when the weather sucks, i grab the SS. SS is always ready to go: check chain tension, lube chain, check brakes, inflate tires and you're off! as stew said, do it!
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  7. #7
    don't try this at home
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    sure. just go easy on the gearing or you'll be walking a lot.
    will you rep me?

  8. #8
    Two Headed Boy
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    I love my SS 29er, its great fun, and the 32x18 gearing doesnt make me walk much at all.

    Funny you have a Giant Yukon, as that is the other MTN bike I have, though its 4 or 5 years old but still in decent shape, and I have not even ridden it since I got the SS 29er! Well that is a lie I did ride it for a few minuets just to see the difference between it and my 29er and found I had no love left for it at all.......

    So go for it SS is the best......as are 29ers
    tSETFREEBYLOVEt

  9. #9
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    thanx

    Hey guys thanx for the replies! My local shop doesnt carry any singlespeeders so i am gonna drive a couple hours to ride the closest one. i think i will love it but wanna make sure. i am apparently a "clyde" though i am not completely sure what that is...im 6'4" 275 i guess that qualifies lol...im wanting to lose some weight and get strong. Ive been looking at a Trek Gary Fisher Marlin singlespeed 29er. anyone know anything about this bike?

  10. #10
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    The Gary Fishers seem decent but can be pricey because they come with high end fox forks sometimes. I would look into something rigid to start out and you will find out fast that rigid is the way to go on a SS.
    Spinnin' & Grinnin'

  11. #11
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    Rigid

    Question: why is a rigid bike better for a SS? and also what exactly is a clyde?

  12. #12
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    You do a lot of standing on a SS and if you have suspension, you will compress it and lose energy when you pedal. Basically a rigid has faster steering and will overall make you a better ride. A clyde is a person over 200 PDS.
    Spinnin' & Grinnin'

  13. #13
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    i think singlespeeders choose rigid because it's simple, lightweight (typically), and clean looking. NOT because it's anti-squishy.

    i disagree that rigid makes you a better rider.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matatat
    Hey guys thanx for the replies! My local shop doesnt carry any singlespeeders so i am gonna drive a couple hours to ride the closest one. i think i will love it but wanna make sure. i am apparently a "clyde" though i am not completely sure what that is...im 6'4" 275 i guess that qualifies lol...im wanting to lose some weight and get strong. Ive been looking at a Trek Gary Fisher Marlin singlespeed 29er. anyone know anything about this bike?

    I have a Marlin single speed. I'm 6"5" 290. The only thing I've upgraded where the Brakes and Fork, I'm running a Tora Solo Air with BB7 Brakes.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verbeers
    I have a Marlin single speed. I'm 6"5" 290. The only thing I've upgraded where the Brakes and Fork, I'm running a Tora Solo Air with BB7 Brakes.
    THIS

    I have one as well, although I have not replaced the things I need to. IE fork and brakes

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexrex20
    i think singlespeeders choose rigid because it's simple, lightweight (typically), and clean looking. NOT because it's anti-squishy.

    i disagree that rigid makes you a better rider.
    It is simple, lightweight, clean looking ... and it is anti-squishy. As "Rad Rider 415" said, SS requires a lot of standing, and unless you have a really nice auto-dampening fork (like terralogic) the squish gets old.

    PS. I think riding rigid improves your skill set in ways that translate to whatever bike you ride later on.

  17. #17
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    clyde=clydesdale i.e. riders that are not your averaged size "horse"!
    -Kevin

    Wanted: 102bcd 4 bolt (M960) SS chainring in 32t or 34t variety

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verbeers
    I have a Marlin single speed. I'm 6"5" 290. The only thing I've upgraded where the Brakes and Fork, I'm running a Tora Solo Air with BB7 Brakes.
    Same here, but with a Recon Solo Air. Oh, but I'm not a Clyde at 5'5" and 140.
    Trying to win hearts and minds, but willing to stomp them if necessary.

  19. #19
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    If you just got in mtb and now looking to go SS, I would put the Kona Unit on the top of the list of bikes I would be considering.
    If you want all the comforts of home, stay there.

    Rides, Reviews, Races and Random Thoughts

  20. #20
    VENI VEDI BIKI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matatat
    is a singlespeed a good idea for a rank beginner?
    My 2 cents. From a pure enjoyment standpoint, if I could have only one bike, it would be my ss. It all comes down to simplicty. Take bike off wall, grease chain, cheack tire pressure, ready to ride. No checking for bent hangers, fluid levels, cable tension. Just pick up and ride. On the trail: simplicity. Just me, my bike, and nature. Only sound is me breathing and the wind. The only things standing between the top of the hill and me are my legs. Nothing to think of other than planning when to stand and hammer. No mis-shifts or dropped chains. No preload, dampeners or lockouts to mess with.

    Just me and the bike.

    To touch on some other comments. Riding rigid makes you a "better" rider because you have to pick cleaner lines and learn to throw your bike around. But better does not equal faster--esp on descents. If your goal is to fly over stuff as fast as possible and you have a need for speed....rigid may not be for you. That said, with a steel fork, a fat front tire, and low pressure, rigid is not THAt much of a liability. You just cant run right into objects and expect your bike to magically go over. I find rigid more chalenging. I also like it better on climbs because you dont eat your energy in your suspension.

    If you are a beginner looking for a simple, cost-effective entry to mountainbiking, I would heartily recommend a singlespeed. If you want to bomb down cliffs with your buddies, get a full squish.

  21. #21
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    Bombing

    So, I am definately not looking to bomb down any cliffs, as I was doing that at first and just a month ago fractured my sternum in a gnarly little accident! I want simple. I like to stop and smell the roses as they say... purely for being on a bike and being lost out in nature. My technique is horrid (though I'm improving) and I don't know most of the terminology of the sport (improving also). Just doing it for the love of doing it. Can't wait to get up to fort worth and take a ride on a single speeder! Spent a lot of time surfing and always rejected the scientifically enhanced shortboards and stuck with the old school longboards...seems I'm in the same boat

  22. #22
    Ahhh the pain....
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    I would add that if you do get a SS, be prepared to get some different cogs (probably more teeth) since it seems many off-the-shelf SS's are 32-17 or 32-18. Not a bad gear if you're either 1) strong 2) live in flat country 3) do short rides 4) have thighs like tree trunks. I've know plenty of folks who bailed on SS because they never switched out the small cog the bike came with (btw, buy cheap steel cogs initially).
    Personally, I started at 32-21 and after about 8 months, I started to kinda get annoyed with the spinni-ness. Then I put on a 20 and at first, I could feel it on the steep stuff, but now it's good.

  23. #23
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    Do it.
    "I have one speed. I have one gear: Go." -- Charlie Sheen

  24. #24
    Two Headed Boy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matatat
    So, I am definately not looking to bomb down any cliffs, as I was doing that at first and just a month ago fractured my sternum in a gnarly little accident! I want simple. I like to stop and smell the roses as they say... purely for being on a bike and being lost out in nature. My technique is horrid (though I'm improving) and I don't know most of the terminology of the sport (improving also). Just doing it for the love of doing it. Can't wait to get up to fort worth and take a ride on a single speeder! Spent a lot of time surfing and always rejected the scientifically enhanced shortboards and stuck with the old school longboards...seems I'm in the same boat
    Rigid would fit the bill there! Makes ya slow down a little and form technique. If you live in northern Maine, my bike is always open for a ride! But alas, very few people live in northern Maine, but honestly thats some of why I like it!

    Anyhow hope you get a bike that fits you well and gives ya a good time!
    tSETFREEBYLOVEt

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    It is simple, lightweight, clean looking ... and it is anti-squishy. As "Rad Rider 415" said, SS requires a lot of standing, and unless you have a really nice auto-dampening fork (like terralogic) the squish gets old.

    PS. I think riding rigid improves your skill set in ways that translate to whatever bike you ride later on.
    I have an old F80X on my go-to SS, but I don't mind the squish on my other bikes. to each their own.

  26. #26
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    Maine

    always wanted to go to Maine! maybe one day! I Live in Texas kinda far away...I think i would like a Mountain Bike/ Lobster trip!

  27. #27
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    New Single Speed!

    Ok so just an update here! I finally got to test ride a single speed and completely fell in love! I purchased the Trek Gary Fisher Marlin Single Speed 29er and its changed my life. I absolutely demolished steep hills that i normally had to walk up on my Giant Yukon full gearie 26"...I am super excited and even more enthusiastic about riding! thanks for all the tips and comments you guys left!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trower
    Rigid would fit the bill there! Makes ya slow down a little and form technique. If you live in northern Maine, my bike is always open for a ride! But alas, very few people live in northern Maine, but honestly thats some of why I like it!

    Anyhow hope you get a bike that fits you well and gives ya a good time!
    My dad grew up in Washburn. I spent a decent amount of time up there growing up. lots of potatoes!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rad Rider 415
    You do a lot of standing on a SS and if you have suspension, you will compress it and lose energy when you pedal. Basically a rigid has faster steering and will overall make you a better ride. A clyde is a person over 200 PDS.
    so i was thinking about converting my geared bike into a ss but should i also swap out the suspension fork for a rigid? that would be $250 swapped out.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin
    so i was thinking about converting my geared bike into a ss but should i also swap out the suspension fork for a rigid? that would be $250 swapped out.
    no, don't swap your fork out, there's nothing wrong with a suspension fork on a singlespeed. Some people complain about pedal bob, but if your fork is set up correctly, it shouldn't really bother you unless you're getting out of saddle too soon. It's faster to pedal in saddle, so you should avoid that anyways.
    It also depends on where you live, if all you ride is buff singletrack, rigid might be faster. But in jagged rocky terrain like out here, suspension wins, hands down.
    However, rigid does make you pick your lines better and is likely to make you an overall more skilled rider. I often take my rigid cross bike out on the trails for a little reminder that it isn't paved with pillows and marshmellows like my Ibis makes it feel like. It's good for a reality check.

  31. #31
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    SS is fun! I just did my maiden SS ride today. I'm running 32x20. Today's ride marks my most aggresive attack on hills since I ride (less than 1 year riding MTB experience). When riding geared, I tend to sit and spin when I see hills. But today although its my 1st SS ride, the moment I see hills I shifted from sit to stand and mash up the hill. It's definitely more engaging in a fun way that sitting down and spin.

    BTW, I run rigid as well.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaizer
    SS is fun! I just did my maiden SS ride today. I'm running 32x20. Today's ride marks my most aggresive attack on hills since I ride (less than 1 year riding MTB experience). When riding geared, I tend to sit and spin when I see hills. But today although its my 1st SS ride, the moment I see hills I shifted from sit to stand and mash up the hill. It's definitely more engaging in a fun way that sitting down and spin.

    BTW, I run rigid as well.
    yea, i rode my geared bike the other day for the first time in so long. It was weird to actually sit and spin, and was rather boring. i found myself going back to the SS ratio, and even though it felt weird climbing out of saddle with 5 inches of travel front and rear, it felt more natural than spinning. Damn how i've gotten lazy! Time to take the road bike out and try to break that habbit.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    It is simple, lightweight, clean looking ... and it is anti-squishy. As "Rad Rider 415" said, SS requires a lot of standing, and unless you have a really nice auto-dampening fork (like terralogic) the squish gets old.

    PS. I think riding rigid improves your skill set in ways that translate to whatever bike you ride later on.
    i was thinking clean looking, and anti squishy, but also because i would ride it more on pavement and non techical trails.

  34. #34
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    single musings

    My SS experience.
    Been on a SS for long....as a kid, 24 inch wheels, 1 speed and coaster brakes ...on the same bike i went from road to sidewalk to trail to wherever.
    Ever watched the kids riding their rigid 1 speeders? Natural technique.
    Fast forward many years and still riding SS .... with bigger wheels.
    Having tried gears and suspension helped to decide... not needed ... !
    Gears made me lazy...i've been able to clear steeper grades and tech sections better on the SS. The momentum needed to be on top of the gear helps inmensely to clear those sections. 33x20 or 19 depending on the trail.
    Spinning? Yes, in the flats !
    SS legs have developed fitness ranging from strength to high rpm, also, body positioning changes inmensely from steep climbing to moderate hills to flats to downhill.
    I've adapted track cycling sprint start technique to steep hill climbing. There's power hidden on those hips.
    SS is a whole body experience ! Like a gym on wheels.
    I ride a 29er. Rigid, steel. Riding rigid has forced me to slow down and remember the basic technique regarding body positioning that i forgot using full suspension. Braking and steering have their unique ways on a rigid.
    Rigid steering is so responsive. It really helps in tight single track, where the longer wheelbase of the 29er might be an issue.
    I started 29er SS'ing on a suspension fork with lockout. The steering felt vague, the bobbing i hated even when locked out.
    Bye susp fork. Hello rigid fork.
    The powerful feeling uphill is great. Just pull on the bars to clear the bigger roots or rocks.
    Rigid on downhills is about reading the terrain and, again, using the body. Full speed downhills, where everything is just a blur is not my style. I like to work the downhill as well as the uphills. There's no hurry.
    My saddle is minimalist....i don't use it much!
    The handlebar is 680 and could be wider for more torque up and control down.
    It's a matter of choice. Some riding buddies laughed when they saw me on a SS. They don't laugh after riding a loop with me. Some even converted.
    Enjoy !
    Simple, not easy.

  35. #35
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    if one was to convert a geared bike to a ss, change the fork to rigid, would it also make sense to change the breaks from disc to (gulp) v-brakes?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin
    if one was to convert a geared bike to a ss, change the fork to rigid, would it also make sense to change the breaks from disc to (gulp) v-brakes?
    Don't over think it. If you have discs why change to v-brakes??
    Mind your own religion.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matatat
    I have a hardtail giant yukon geared. So the question is this: after some research i really want to try a singlespeed. i am one who is out there for the exercise and being on the bike and trail. i often stop to just enjoy the view (and take a breath). is a singlespeed a good idea...?
    The answer is yes. I was in the EXACT same position. Here is my Yukon converted to single speed and I will never, NEVER go back


  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS
    The answer is yes. I was in the EXACT same position. Here is my Yukon converted to single speed and I will never, NEVER go back

    another guy on the flat pedals. gotta love it

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoisonDartFrog
    Don't over think it. If you have discs why change to v-brakes??
    i just thought by simplifying everything else it would make sense to change to the v-brakes to make it even lighter, but maybe it's not a good idea.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack-a-nator
    another guy on the flat pedals. gotta love it
    Simplicity man, that's what single speed is all about

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS
    The answer is yes. I was in the EXACT same position. Here is my Yukon converted to single speed and I will never, NEVER go back

    are those disc brakes on your ss? nice ride by the way.
    i'd like to convert my 27 gear to a ss but i'm not sure if i should keep the disc brakes or change over to v-brakes. it's all about simplicity right?

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin
    are those disc brakes on your ss? nice ride by the way.
    i'd like to convert my 27 gear to a ss but i'm not sure if i should keep the disc brakes or change over to v-brakes. it's all about simplicity right?
    Yes those are disc brakes, BB5's with 180mm Alligator rotors. Go ahead and convert it, you can always change it back if it's not your thing. If I were you I would keep the disc brakes, you've already got them. It's not that one brake is more simple than the other, what I meant by what I said about simplicity (referring to plarform pedals) is I can just jump on my bike and ride. I don't need to throw on any special shoes or other non-sense. I can just ride. I went with disc brakes for a few reasons, I like them, I had them, I'm a big dude and need the power, the terrain I tend to ride on demands them, and it was physically impossible to run V-brakes on my frame, fork, and rims. I have nothing against V-brakes but that is why I chose disc.

  43. #43
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    I guess if you want to get technical I kind of have V-brakes on my bike..my chain tensioner is a V-brake arm


  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin
    now is that a ss internal hub or just a different kind of ss hook up?
    I'm running a multi-speed rear hub with a single speed cog and spacers.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS
    I guess if you want to get technical I kind of have V-brakes on my bike..my chain tensioner is a V-brake arm

    good point. i'll keep the disc brakes and i already have the platform pedals on there. now is that a ss internal hub or just a different kind of ss hook up?

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS
    I'm running a multi-speed rear hub with a single speed cog and spacers.
    multi speed hub? ok i'm officially confused.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin
    multi speed hub? ok i'm officially confused.
    A hub that is capable of running a 8,9,or 10 speed cassette. I do not have a single speed specific hub. I am using one single cog and using spacers to fill the gaps where the other cogs would be if it were, say, a 9 speed cassette.

  48. #48
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    First Ride on my new used SS.
    im gasping...im typing because im not sure i can make it back up the steps yet.
    and this is was the first bike ride in about 3 years unless you consider fat tire cruiser in Key West....

    Everything is hard before it gets easy.

    exactly what i was looking for in a work out.

    Bill D on the hilly streets of Louisville's East End.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    My dad grew up in Washburn. I spent a decent amount of time up there growing up. lots of potatoes!
    Small world, my fathers also from Washburn and his family used to farm, but then went into the gravel pit business on the Parsons road along the Aroostook. I live in Presque Isle now. But anyhow thats crazy, being that Washburn in such a small place.
    tSETFREEBYLOVEt

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matatat
    Ok so just an update here! I finally got to test ride a single speed and completely fell in love! I purchased the Trek Gary Fisher Marlin Single Speed 29er and its changed my life. I absolutely demolished steep hills that i normally had to walk up on my Giant Yukon full gearie 26"...I am super excited and even more enthusiastic about riding! thanks for all the tips and comments you guys left!
    Glad you like it! The Marlin is a nice ride, I'm sure it will treat ya well

    Quote Originally Posted by Matatat
    always wanted to go to Maine! maybe one day! I Live in Texas kinda far away...I think i would like a Mountain Bike/ Lobster trip!
    Haha, ya my Uncle fishes on the coast, and man I have spent to many hours on a Lobster boat and working in mackerel pens/shoveling mackerel:/ to enjoy that kinda stuff anymore. But the MTB trails are great across the state!
    tSETFREEBYLOVEt

  51. #51
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    squatch: good to hear your comin out of it.

    oh, and i still friggin hate you.

    and for those (like me) struggling with a lack of fitness, even lance himself said, "it never quits hurting, you just get faster", or something like that. im not actually even sure it was lance.

    and goin for a lot of short rides helps way more than trying to kill yourself once a week.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwheelin
    are those disc brakes on your ss? nice ride by the way.
    i'd like to convert my 27 gear to a ss but i'm not sure if i should keep the disc brakes or change over to v-brakes. it's all about simplicity right?
    Mechanical disc brakes are about as simple as it gets and even the operation of good hydraulics is not rocket science. I have disc brakes on my 29er SS, v-brakes on my 26" SS and the bike with disc brakes definately has a much cleaner look.

    There is also much more to riding a rigid fork than just because its less complicated than a suspension fork. In some ways, simplicity is a contradiction when referring to rigid forks. One of the main draws to riding a rigid bike is that riding anything but a relatively smooth trail, is anything but simple.

  53. #53
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    +1 on platforms.

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    oops, i'm a couple pages late

    but i can't imagine why anyone would switch from discs to v-brakes, unless they're going from Tektro discs to XTR V-brakes.

  55. #55
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    I find that my heartrate is actually more under control riding SS than gearies. It's more of a complete workout all together.

    I personally went for a rigid for my build for two reasons.

    1. To learn better handling basics, suspension tends to mask sloppy skills... a lot.
    2. I imagine a miss match if I were to go with a suspension fork as it would allow much faster speed that I can spin when the going gets fast.

  56. #56
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    so you went rigid specifically to be less efficient...

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexrex20
    so you went rigid specifically to be less efficient...
    Depending if you're refering to the ups or downs I guess. Going up, the rigid gives zero bob and allows me to wrestle the bars for leverage.

    Going down, well if your definition of efficient is to have an easier workout, then yes it's less efficient. It's just like going to gym and go with lighter weight for bench presses. It's more efficient in the way, but what you gain is probably speed an and reps. In the case of a suspension over rigid, you'll gain speed and mileage if running suspension.

    On my maiden ride, I did climb faster than gearies on HT/FS spinning (more efficient?). On the downs, I did manage to overtake a few riders riding HT (less efficient?). I do have to constantly remind myself what Lee (leelikesbikes) says, heavy feet, light hands.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilmfat
    "it never quits hurting, you just get faster"
    Close.....It never gets easier, you just get faster. Greg LeMond

  59. #59
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    thanks yo.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilmfat
    squatch: good to hear your comin out of it.

    oh, and i still friggin hate you.
    What?

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianU
    There is also much more to riding a rigid fork than just because its less complicated than a suspension fork. In some ways, simplicity is a contradiction when referring to rigid forks. One of the main draws to riding a rigid bike is that riding anything but a relatively smooth trail, is anything but simple.
    Well said ! This statement will startup our next post-ride, beer-in-hand, SS philosophical musings session. "The rigid fork simplicity paradox" if i could suggest a name.
    Simple, not easy.

  62. #62
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    sasquatch: recovery.

    i guess it is kind of out of context, since you didnt talk about it in this thread.

    but good to hear youre ride-able again.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilmfat
    sasquatch: recovery.

    i guess it is kind of out of context, since you didnt talk about it in this thread.

    but good to hear youre ride-able again.
    Thanks I guess you got the low-down on everything from my thread here? http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=711248

  64. #64
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    yeah. im getting my threads all confused.

    maybe i should load the girls up in the trailer and go for a ride once in a while, instead of surfing the forums all day. lol.

    good luck on your speech btw.

    *we now return you to your regularly scheduled discussion. *
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilmfat

    maybe i should load the girls up in the trailer and go for a ride once in a while, instead of surfing the forums all day.
    I'm thinking I should do the same. Should probably be studying for my Calculus test tomorrow and the exam Friday..but a ride would be nice. Probably won't though, just from lack of energy. Still on pain meds for teeth.

  66. #66
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    Musings with a little help

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaizer
    Going down, well if your definition of efficient is to have an easier workout, then yes it's less efficient. It's just like going to gym and go with lighter weight for bench presses. It's more efficient in the way, but what you gain is probably speed an and reps.
    I like this argument. Excellent position.
    From a workout point of view, i like using the analogy of the SS as gym: In this case let's talk gears.
    I feel gears are to SS as bench pressing is to pushups or selectorized equipment to whole body exercises: gears on the bike, as the bench in pressing, and the selectorized equipment in exercises are mechanical and positional assistance devices. They make a task easier.
    Want to really workout? Try pushups, feet up on a box, clap pushups, inverted pushups, handstand pushups, pullups, dips, box jumps, etc and compare the whole body experience to the limited isolation that bench pressing or selectorized equipment represents.
    After a session on my SS, my whole body is pumped. Not just legs. SS riding is a true whole body workout. It's like gymnastics on the bike: a true body weight workout.
    Geared riding? There's always the benches and selectorized equipment.
    In the long run, SS riding will make the rider fitter overall. Is a fitter rider a better rider? You bet.
    Simple, not easy.

  67. #67
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    Say if an SS Rigid rider went to ride a FS gearies, The only area of concentration would be increase in speed?

  68. #68
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    dont forget fussing with the sus and adjusting the gears.

    rigid SS for me please.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaizer
    Say if an SS Rigid rider went to ride a FS gearies, The only area of concentration would be increase in speed?
    When the FS gearie finishes setting his sag fore and aft while fumbling with the shock pump in the process, making sure shifters shift, cables pull, cassettes click, chainrings ring, derailleurs derail and the chain won't jump off, i'll be way ahead on the trail, with a fatter pocket for beers at the end ! (If they make it without problems with shifting, pulling, clicking, ringing, derailing or jumping off)
    Simple, not easy.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaizer
    Say if an SS Rigid rider went to ride a FS gearies, The only area of concentration would be increase in speed?
    Truly, in the end, speed is not all the fun in SS rigid riding. Its a more holistic experience.

    I came from FS geared. What ive gained in SS rigid riding is way beyond speed, comfort, efficiency or other attributes to FS/gears. It has to be experienced to be understood.
    Simple, not easy.

  71. #71
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    Can rigid be fast in the fun bits

    Ive followed this thread and Im sorry to highjack, but it looks like Kaizer, Balance and ilmfat you have some experience with the rigid set up. I admire the rigid set up and admit the weight, stiffness and climbing ability are very appealing aspects. However, once I have earned my altitude, I really like to reward myself with some speed. Im keen to go the rigid, but all the videos I have seen of them seem to have them going very slow on the downs. Are they that punishing? To me ripping down is also a big work out, pumping and working all over the bike hard, my legs and core get worked just like they do mashing up. Can you enlighten me any further?

    For the descent, for example, how hard is it to stay with a group of geared HTs on average single track, not super steep with a few bumps and lumps inter-dispersed with smoother sections a few berm corners and few flat corners etc.

    My SS is a 26 Chameleon, but I am looking at moving to a 29er and am considering my build options. The appeal of set and forget re no fork is also there, after having to do a rebuild recently.

    I know bmx bikes are rigid, so the pumping part can only get better, but is there any forgiveness out there in rigid world...

  72. #72
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    remember WilliamK, they're afraid of going too fast on the trail.

  73. #73
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    lol. i actually am afraid of going too fast on the trail. i finally realized im not as hardcore as i want to think of myself as being. i just like bein in the woods. goin a little fast, i admit.

    for me its about simplicity. i used to love to build bikes (still do, really), but i hate TUNING bikes.

    3 yrs ago i built a couple bikes for some friends and had wheels/controls/fork left over and couldnt scrape the cash for a geared drivetrain, so figured id pick up a frame and go SS. i could never climb with gears anyways. figured with SS, id have an excuse for walkin it. even if it is a bs excuse. i havent bought geared bits since.

    but once i tried SS, i SERIOUSLY noticed the fork bob.

    even with gears, i was never happy with sus fork performance, really. it never seemed to help on the small stuff, and the big stuff i still had to use body english to ride over anyways. i rode some serious chunk a couple times when i lived in wyoming. even with a sus fork there were parts i had to walk. i took a beating. so might as well go rigid.

    when i went rigid i noticed my "tiny" wheels. so i thought id try this "29er thing".

    went 29er, and while its still rigid, its better than 26" rigid, imo.

    you wanna know when i miss sus the most? droppin curbs. on the trail u just adapt.

    rigid isnt "slower", its less comfortable "at speed". you can go just as fast, but youll get beat up more.

    as far as keeping up with HT's on an "average" trail, give it 2 weeks of riding rigid, a month tops, and ull be able to keep up with the slowest rider (unless, like me, ur already the slowest). in my experience, its totally worth the trade off.

    if your building a 29er anyways, get a rigid fork first. if you dont like it after giving it a fair shake, your only out a lil money.

    and the only clipless i own are coda's off a bike i got used and sold long ago. i never even had the cleats for 'em.

    hopefully im done rambling.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by balance_fit
    "The rigid fork simplicity paradox"
    Most definately a cool term, I think you nailed it!

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamK
    However, once I have earned my altitude, I really like to reward myself with some speed. Im keen to go the rigid, but all the videos I have seen of them seem to have them going very slow on the downs. Are they that punishing? To me ripping down is also a big work out, pumping and working all over the bike hard, my legs and core get worked just like they do mashing up. Can you enlighten me any further?

    For the descent, for example, how hard is it to stay with a group of geared HTs on average single track, not super steep with a few bumps and lumps inter-dispersed with smoother sections a few berm corners and few flat corners etc.

    My SS is a 26 Chameleon, but I am looking at moving to a 29er and am considering my build options. The appeal of set and forget re no fork is also there, after having to do a rebuild recently.

    I know bmx bikes are rigid, so the pumping part can only get better, but is there any forgiveness out there in rigid world...
    Thanks for posting William !

    IMO, coming down the hills in my rigid 29er SS has been, like climbing and flats, an experience of rebirth. Granted, the 29er eases a lot of the hardships coming down, but, it still rigid and one has to read the terrain,body positioning is essential here. Misread a root or a rock and you won't forget. Even so, once dialed, quite interesting things can be achieved down the hill on the rigid.
    On the other hand, since the rigid exhibits no brake dive, quite steep drops now appear doable, those that scared me quite a bit when i rode suspended.
    I regularly ride a XC loop which i share with many other riders, from FS to HT, beginners to pros. In this loop there's everything, from single to wide track, smooth to shattering, loose to packed, tame and sharp ups and downs. Even shallow stream crossings. Descending i have no issues keeping with most of the intermediates riding geared HT's. If the singletrack gets tight, the excellent maneuverability of the rigid fork makes up for the 'hardships' or the rigid ride and i'm able to keep up with my peers. Line choice and momentum, with maneuverability are primo.
    Try to get a rigid 29er and ride it ! Give the setup several rides to start making sense and i'm sure you won't be dissapointed. SS rigid is different and satisfyingly so.
    Simple, not easy.

  76. #76
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    *Long post alert*

    WilliamK, I'm really fresh in the SS rigid world (gearing 32x20 / A2C 470mm), so do take this with a heavy grain of salt. I just had my 1st ride last week. The trail was not gnarly and quite flowy.

    To explain, let's break up the two. SS / Rigid.

    Rigid Fork
    I'm quite the lazy bum being used to FS and more of the sit and pedal type. I'm a weak climber, since I smoke and only ride once a week. I went from a 2x9 to 1x9. All my friend laugh at me when I go 1x9 since even with grannies I'm out of breath on climbs.

    It took a few rides to condition accustomed myself with the 1x9. I climb slightly faster now, but I still have the habit of sitting too much on climbs. It gets to the extent of it gets boring and blowing my heart rate on extended climbs. Tiring and no fun.

    After reading the SS forum of rider's experience and since I got a HT frame at home, I'd thought of building up a training bike with SS & Rigid.

    On the 1st ride... It's quite an eye opener of how suspension technology mask skill incompetencies, atleast for me. I had a near endo within first kilometer on the ride. What felt like a small bump while sit and pedal now felt like a big jolt! It really force me to stand up in attack position and soak up the bumps rather than relying on the suspension to plow though the rough stuffs.

    On climbs, it's my first time ever to catch up with my friends. Heck, I finally can use the bell and shout "Rider!" at him... LOL

    Since the gearing is lower and the drivetrain is more efficient & NO BOB, standing up to mash really makes the climb quick since there is no waste energy. On steeper terrain, I'm using the handlebar as leverage. Yeah, so on short & spiky climbs I did overtook quite a few gearies.

    On the descends... Well, say if the skill level is the same, the one on the FS will definately be faster. It's the force training a rigid fork gives that draws me in. Once you get up to speed, you have two choice. If I were to do what I do on the FS, aka hold on tight or stand rigid, it will violently shake me up to pieces! Teeth chattering, vision blurry and a very bad migraine headache for the rest of the ride. I tried "Heavy Foot, Light Hands" method with the body low to absorb the bumps better, it's there where it all clicks. I did overtook a few HTs and FS as well. I did try to pump the terrain, but the rigid fork makes the bumps more jolting that what I'm used to, so I'm having trouble timing it right at the moment.


    Single Speed
    It forces lazy bums like me to stand up and mash. Either that or walk. It also makes me preserve momentum better, knowing that I only have one gear, I use lesser brakes so I can coast on the uphill standing, ready to mash the remaining. Therefore makes the whole ride more engaging and interesting rather than the previous 'suffer on the ups and enjoy the downs.

    On the descends, at 32x20 I run out of gears pretty fast. Standing up pedalling, the cadence is even lower still. I find that at the moment, the coasting speed is just right where I'm at the outer edge of my control zone on a rigid, skill wise. So all's good.


    I still have a 5" FS 1x9 at home. It would be interesting to compare notes with the FS gearies after a few more rides on the SS-R.

  77. #77
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    Yeah alexrex20, Im scaring myself all of the time and I have a way too intimate relationship with the ground already. Maybe rigid will slow me down, although, I cant image it will reduce the amount of time I roll around on the ground...

    ilmfat and balance fit, thanks for the replies and the encouragement.

    for me its about simplicity
    I totally agree. Very appealling, just jump on and ride.

    i tried SS, i SERIOUSLY noticed the fork bob
    I have a fork with the hydraulic X loc, I am really happy with the lock out, the button is very well placed on the bars and I enjoy the climbs without any bob, negligible is probably the better word. No doubt rigid will yield more.

    i have no issues keeping with most
    Excellent news, hammering with a rigid sounds like fun, certainly engaging if not a little edgy.

    There are some compelling reasons to give it a go.

    My local LBS have a Sir 9 SS for demo, I spoke to them yesterday and they can tee up a rigid ride for me as well. So I will try both 29er formats.

    Thanks for the props.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamK
    ...Maybe rigid will slow me down...
    I chose to slow down after I got a SS rigid. I'd suggest at least trying it a few times. I could be blasting down my local trails beating myself up, but you see and enjoy so much more on the trail when you slow your pace a bit. It just makes it all that much more worth your time and money that you spent to get where you are currently at.

  79. #79
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    Hey Kaizer,
    Some similarities in the journey here. Started with a hardtail with triple rings, broke that frame, then a FS with triple rings, then while lurking on the SS forum I bought a Chameleon second hand, at the same time 1 x 10 had come out. Got sick of the slow speed granny spin thing and was thinking of building up to SS anyway. All that granny spinning for me makes it hard to balance in tech stuff. Purposefully changed to 1 x set up to build strength and to improve tech speed and to maybe one day SS.

    I then got a new FS and it went 1 x 10 to. Silence was golden, loved it and made my mate change to 1 x set up as well, as I got sick of his chain slap.

    Now I have gone to SS and it is definitely great fun, probably 20 rides in now. I came back one cog this morning and found I had more speed up the hills because my standing cadence was better interesting stuff to work out this SS where your SS sweet spot is.
    .
    It's the force training a rigid fork gives that draws me in
    This is one of the more important aspects for me. Part of SS for me is about a bigger work out, more work for the arms, core and legs. I take your points, all good, thanks for sharing.

    I'll be interested to hear your stoke with another half dozen rides under you belt, enjoy!

  80. #80
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    Reading this thread has piqued my interest. I have a 2010 Hardrock sport disc 29 and the thought of throwing a rigid fork (i'm still running stock components mostly) and dropping all those gears I rarely if ever use sounds downright enticing.

  81. #81
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    its funny...
    it takes 50-ish bucks to "properly" turn a gearie single, but the other way around is 200+.

    and rigid/suspension's even more of a disparity.

    course, rigid SS is cheaper on the front end.

    if your thinkin bout it, just pull the trigger. it rocks.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  82. #82
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    Outside Outfitters has Voodoo Zombie (470mm A2C) for just $50.
    https://www.outsideoutfitters.com/p-...6-29-fork.aspx

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    Quote Originally Posted by balance_fit View Post
    After a session on my SS, my whole body is pumped. Not just legs. SS riding is a true whole body workout. It's like gymnastics on the bike: a true body weight workout.
    Geared riding? There's always the benches and selectorized equipment.
    In the long run, SS riding will make the rider fitter overall. Is a fitter rider a better rider? You bet.
    So my SS is just like my Total Gym with me playing the Chuck Norris part?
    sweetness!


    I actually was thinking about this post while riding yesterday...when going up long hills i would jump outta the saddle them really pump with my arms to..by the time i was too the top my triceps were feeling it too...

    great analogy

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrCrabby01 View Post
    ...when going up long hills i would jump outta the saddle them really pump with my arms to..by the time i was too the top my triceps were feeling it too...
    i read this and i just want to ride...
    Simple, not easy.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamK View Post
    Now I have gone to SS and it is definitely great fun, probably 20 rides in now. I came back one cog this morning and found I had more speed up the hills because my standing cadence was better interesting stuff to work out this SS where your SS sweet spot is.
    .

    This is one of the more important aspects for me. Part of SS for me is about a bigger work out, more work for the arms, core and legs. I take your points, all good, thanks for sharing.
    Very glad to read about your experience. Keep us posted as you grow stronger !
    Simple, not easy.

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    Iv found that you can try to explain SS and rigid riding in words all you want but that awesome understanding of it all comes with time. After you have been riding ss a bit and your technique has gotten better, you know exactly when to start pumping, how to leave the brake lever alone, how to keep momentum and use it to your advantage, thats when it happens. You'll be itching to ride after a few days off, you get home from work and hit the trail. The climbs feel great, your legs burn but your dont even notice it because your so used to it. You bomb down sections you were scared to even withs a squish fork. You lean back and your arms are loose like noodles but your grip is tight and you just float over everything. Eveything is smooth as butter and you didnt even have to try. That ride is what its all about.

    plus the girls are like omg just one gear omg your so strong!

  87. #87
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    Your spelling and grammar give me a headache.
    Last edited by alexrex20; 05-26-2011 at 11:47 PM.

  88. #88
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    Agreed on the spelling, but I heard that his grammar was a very nice lady. Perhaps we should leave the relatives out of this...

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    Sorrry, i was inebriated at the time. Fkn grammar nazis.

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    SS is the way to go!

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybum View Post
    I would add that if you do get a SS, be prepared to get some different cogs (probably more teeth) since it seems many off-the-shelf SS's are 32-17 or 32-18. Not a bad gear if you're either 1) strong 2) live in flat country 3) do short rides 4) have thighs like tree trunks. I've know plenty of folks who bailed on SS because they never switched out the small cog the bike came with (btw, buy cheap steel cogs initially).
    Personally, I started at 32-21 and after about 8 months, I started to kinda get annoyed with the spinni-ness. Then I put on a 20 and at first, I could feel it on the steep stuff, but now it's good.
    New to SS here too...

    With changing out the cogs I would think that changes the the wheelbase a tad too...right?

    If I was to go from a 14t to a 21t(commuter set up to trail set up) would I need to get a chain tensioner to make up the difference in slack?

    Thanks
    "A splendid time was had by all and all were had." ~ Wire Train

  92. #92
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    Mind your own religion.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by ABQDave View Post
    If I was to go from a 14t to a 21t(commuter set up to trail set up) would I need to get a chain tensioner to make up the difference in slack?
    Not if you have horizontal drop-outs
    Mind your own religion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PoisonDartFrog View Post
    Not if you have horizontal drop-outs

    Thanks PDF

    I do have horizontal drop-outs. I guess I'm thinking that with the larger cog the wheelbase will in turn be shorter as the wheel will have to be slid forward a bit to compensate.
    "A splendid time was had by all and all were had." ~ Wire Train

  95. #95
    ilmfat
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    i run 32/12 on my deadeye. i cant use tugs made for qr (like my eye candy red homebrew ones). if i went to a 14t, i could get em on there.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by ABQDave View Post
    New to SS here too...

    With changing out the cogs I would think that changes the the wheelbase a tad too...right?

    If I was to go from a 14t to a 21t(commuter set up to trail set up) would I need to get a chain tensioner to make up the difference in slack?

    Thanks
    You wont need chain tensioners, but going from a 14 to a 21 would be a stretch with the same chain unless you have super long drop outs. I run a 21 all the way to the front of the drop out and can swap it out with and 18, but that is about as far as I can go with out having to take links out of the chain.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamK View Post
    Ive followed this thread and Im sorry to highjack, but it looks like Kaizer, Balance and ilmfat you have some experience with the rigid set up. I admire the rigid set up and admit the weight, stiffness and climbing ability are very appealing aspects. However, once I have earned my altitude, I really like to reward myself with some speed. Im keen to go the rigid, but all the videos I have seen of them seem to have them going very slow on the downs. Are they that punishing? To me ripping down is also a big work out, pumping and working all over the bike hard, my legs and core get worked just like they do mashing up. Can you enlighten me any further?

    For the descent, for example, how hard is it to stay with a group of geared HTs on average single track, not super steep with a few bumps and lumps inter-dispersed with smoother sections a few berm corners and few flat corners etc.

    My SS is a 26 Chameleon, but I am looking at moving to a 29er and am considering my build options. The appeal of set and forget re no fork is also there, after having to do a rebuild recently.

    I know bmx bikes are rigid, so the pumping part can only get better, but is there any forgiveness out there in rigid world...
    I'm riding a SS rigid 29er. Mostly (north georgia) singletrack riding for me. I feel as though I can haul ass as much as any fs bike out here. I just have to choose my lines more wisely. I may try and bring my camera with me tomorrow morning to get some video to show you that it can indeed be done.

    I say try rigid since forks are cheap. if you dont like it, it is easy to upgrade to a squishy one.

  98. #98
    balance_fit
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    Quote Originally Posted by ABQDave View Post
    New to SS here too...

    With changing out the cogs I would think that changes the the wheelbase a tad too...right?

    If I was to go from a 14t to a 21t(commuter set up to trail set up) would I need to get a chain tensioner to make up the difference in slack?

    Thanks
    In my case i switch from a 13 t to a 21 t from road to trail. I do use a chain tensioner, Surly, for keeping a correct tension under very hard efforts. I've found that quick release on track dropouts, even with small tensioning screws on my Jamis Dragon, are prone to slipping.
    To take care of the difference in chain length from using cogs that are so different i have 2 chains, one for each cog. These 2 chains are cut at the appropiate length so to keep a constant wheelbase between cog changes.
    I also have a spare chain in hand on my toolbox, a SRAM 8 speed with the magnificent power link, for emergencies.
    Simple, not easy.

  99. #99
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    After a few more rides... Here's what I found out, so far.

    I get tired/beat up much faster than riding FS. The constant arms and legs movement, right posture and etc is paramount.

    Also a good set of brakes is important. At the moment I have some non-series mech disc on mine that requires some death grip arm muscle to slow me down. Couple that with some rough trails makes me a young candidate for Parkinson Decease... LOL

  100. #100
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    Lot of fast bullets out there

    Quote Originally Posted by theblackbullet View Post
    I'm riding a SS rigid 29er. Mostly (north georgia) singletrack riding for me. I feel as though I can haul ass as much as any fs bike out here. I just have to choose my lines more wisely.
    one.
    Hi Blackbullet, thank you for taking the time to enlighten me further. Wow, that is exactly the news I wanted to hear.

    I also have this quote recently from Silver Bullet in another tread : just to play devils advocate - i have a one 9 with a carbon rigid on it and i love it..... why i got a one 9 with rigid. ****ing fast, light and stiff rocket for smooth and buff trails. wicked fast and predictable handling. with the right tires at low pressure....awesome.

    It seems like if you have 'Bullet' in your name, you are naturally faster on a rigid.

    My local track is relatively buff single track, sure it has some rough sections, log hops, little drops, little G outs and little rock gardens but for the most part it is firm and smoothish. Bumps are mainly fist size or smaller. There are smooth lines through these, most of the time.


    I am asking the rigid speed question because the advantages of rigid appeal to me greatly. However, I need to be able to stay with (or be in touch with) my social riding group when we ride this terrain - and maybe just occasional give them a run for the money, before the legs expire. One of the guys pushes a new 29 HT (1x9) and the others are riding XC 26 FS bikes.

    I know that going fast requires line choice and that sustained fast will beat you up, but I guess I want to know other than those things, it is 'actually' possible to turn a decent amount of pace. Is it truly possible. I do love some speed and I need to be 'able' to do so some speed somewhere on my rides. So the words mentioned by your silver brother fast, light and stiff rocket...wicked fast have me greatly intrigued, interested and if not excited about the prospects.

    And a bag full of acceleration ability, which I am guessing is what you get from rigid, is plenty of fun to get you into trouble for the next corner/ feature...

    As for rough or technical track, I am happy to work through those challenges at the required pace.

    I am trying to tee up a demo ride with a rigid fork, and I'll go and see for myself. I guess front tyres have a bit to do with it to, we'll see what the demo has.

    Speed is relative to, so I am wonder if occasional the realm of rigid speed can be in the realm of suspended HT with a big effort and a stupid grin.

    Thanks again for the positive encouragement. I'd be interested in hearing and seeing some more on this.

  101. #101
    Come see me after class
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    Jesus H Christ, just try it!!!!

  102. #102
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    Yep I will.

    I was just worried that they were scared of going fast on the trail...

    Cheers
    William

  103. #103
    ilmfat
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    passing geared riders on climbs is really fun.

    or so ive heard.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  104. #104
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    I don't think single speeds are bad for beginners, as long as one doesn't have an ego about walking things from time to time. The straightforward simplicity of everything is refreshing, and there is a lot less gear to fuss with. One of the greatest things about single speeds is that they need barely any maintenance, and you can always just throw your leg over one and ride. To me, the lack of complexity is a great beginner advantage.

  105. #105
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    Do it! Start out easy on the gearing. It may be hard at first but stick with it.

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    just back from the first experience...we had a skills class first then short trail ride.....downhill was absolutely amazing...i definitely need to change the gearing (i'm at 32-16 now...)

    32/20 sound right for (slightly) hilly trails?
    no one else in the group has SS or i'd ask them

  107. #107
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    IMHO, sometimes an over easy gearing will wear one out too. The worst is when the gearing is inbetween sitting and standing, coupled that with a longish climb, my heart rate goes over the roof! When it's short and steep (ish), standing mash with extra leverage from the handlebar work wonders. And there where a newbie like me drop other riders sitting and spinning in their grannies.

  108. #108
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    32/16 is pretty short for any types of hills, especially for a new rider. A 20t will obviously be easier, but you may not need to make that big a jump. Try an 18t first, unless you are nowhere near making your regular rides on 16.
    Mind your own religion.

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    Im thinking 32/18 might be a good idea....and...i could probably use wider handle bars to

    realized alot after posting...i was hugely overwhelmed at some stuff and I don't remember breathing at all so im sure it was very short hyperventilating breaths...

    thanks guys

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrCrabby01 View Post
    just back from the first experience...we had a skills class first then short trail ride.....downhill was absolutely amazing...i definitely need to change the gearing (i'm at 32-16 now...)

    32/20 sound right for (slightly) hilly trails?
    no one else in the group has SS or i'd ask them
    I currently ride 33/20 on my 29er. It allows me to clear 99% of all the hills on my trails. The 1% i don't make is because of lack of momentum, faulty line selection, spinning a tire or ....
    It might be a little difficult to recommend a particular gearing for a "(slightly) hilly trail". In which case, you might choose your gearing like i did it, by elimination: For your hardest uphills, is 32/16 a definite walk? Or does it allow you to 'almost make it' ? If it's a definite walk, you might benefit from having an 18T and a 20T to try out. If it's an 'almost make it', work it out !!! Technique, practice, strength, line....


    jd
    Simple, not easy.

  111. #111
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    I believe the Gary Fisher singlespeeds are coming 32/20. I ride 32/18, I find it workable but most of the climbs in my area are short. I ride with a couple guys running 32/20, they spin up a storm getting to the trail head but enjoy themselves once they get there. Cogs are cheap, buy a couple and experiment!

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rad Rider 415 View Post
    The Gary Fishers seem decent but can be pricey because they come with high end fox forks sometimes. I would look into something rigid to start out and you will find out fast that rigid is the way to go on a SS.
    Putting a squish fork on my single speed was the best thing I ever did to my single speed. It fixed the bone rattling and the geometrey of my C.u.S.S.


    p.s. You're mom is like a 29er she goes wide in the curves.

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    I went to the LBS and told them what i wanted to try...they had an 18T there they would let me try out for the next trail ride. Good news is trail ride scheduled for tonight..bad news its getting ready to pour rain here.

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrCrabby01 View Post
    I went to the LBS and told them what i wanted to try...they had an 18T there they would let me try out for the next trail ride. Good news is trail ride scheduled for tonight..bad news its getting ready to pour rain here.
    Keep us posted on your experience !
    Simple, not easy.

  115. #115
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    not a big ride just 30 mins in the neighborhood trying to find every hill i could find....the difference was not HUGE but obviously noticeable that i think going 32/20 would be way too much....but for the alternative trails it might be the ticket.

    i like the 32/18 alot better than the 32/16 for sure though

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