Single Speed Noobie (really lost)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Single Speed Noobie (really lost)

    alright i am going singlespeed. CHEERS**** How do i do it?
    here's where i'm at, i just got my cassette taken off. thats as far as i got.
    my bike is Specialized p2 cro-mo. it has horizontal drop out. and here's my questions:
    - since my bike was a 9 speed, do i need a new front chainring in order to fit my single-speed chain? or can i just use my old chainring?
    -I've been looking through webs and some single speed kits requires a chain tensioner, but mine is a horizontal drop-out does that mean anything. and this is the kit i've been looking at: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...speed+Kit.aspx (Wheels Manufacturing Singlespeed Kit SSK-3) does this require a chain tensioner?
    -for you guys who has used a single speed conversion kit which one would you recommend? that doesn't require a chain tensioner and at a reasonable price.

    If you finish reading, thanks and please try and reply soon and here's a pic of a bike like mine, i can't upload my pics for some reason but it's the same year and stuff.
    Thanks
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  2. #2
    Rolling
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    That conversion kit will work. I'm guessing the cog will work too but I don't have experience with that. I took the appropriate cog from my cassette and used it. I ripped up an 8 speed system. Worst case you need a wider chain but keep the crank.

    You will likely need the tensioner because it looks like your dropout is not long enough to take up any chain slack. It also looks like that frame needs the axle to bottom out in the dropout.

    Enjoy.

  3. #3
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    but can't i just cut the slack out? i really can't afford a tensioner lol.

  4. #4
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    The P2 comes with horizontal drops, doesn't it? If so, you can tension your chain by moving the axle back in the dropouts. Worst case is you'll need a half link which isn't a big deal. You could just get a half link chain to start.

  5. #5
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    Pricepoint has 2 Sette tensioners for under $20, one fixed and one spring tension. I'm building up my first SS too and thought I could do it really cheaply but spacers, a cog, a tensioner and a SS specific ring (Blackspire Veloce 32t for $25). I figured I'd spend a little extra money to get something reliable right off the bat.

    There is a thread on this page about homemade tensioners (I like the spoon) give it a look>

  6. #6
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    wat does tensioning the chain even mean? can i just take one of the slots out of the chain and thats tension enough right? and yes it's a horizontal drop out.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by chenny
    wat does tensioning the chain even mean? can i just take one of the slots out of the chain and thats tension enough right? and yes it's a horizontal drop out.
    tensioning the chain just means getting it tight enough. Your bike has horizontal dropouts, so sliding the axle is what you will do to get the chain tight. Without that you would have to use a separate tensioner to push on the chain to achieve the same level of tightness.

    You are going to have to get a chain tool to remove links from your chain to that it is the correct length to wrap around both cogs without any extra links. Like Schmucker said, with the short dropouts on that bike you might have to use a half link to get the length of your chain just right. A half link is half as long as a normal link and allows you to fine tune the chain length

    The SS cog in that kit you linked to should work great... certainly better than a cassette cog. A cog taken from a cassette has short teeth. The taller teeth of an actual ss cog make the chain less likely to skip under hard pedaling and less likely to jump off.

    Your existing chainring should work well enough. Even if it has shorter teeth too, there are more teeth and more of the chain is engaged by the chainring, so skipping shouldn't be a problem.

  8. #8
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! thank you!!!!

    man dude that just answered all my questions thanks soo much you guys.

  9. #9
    Rolling
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    did anyone else here look at the p2 frame?

    I'm questioning the length of the horizontal drop out.It seems not necessarily enough (compare it to dedicated SS frames such as Surley--deep drop outs). Maybe for certain gear combos it might work...but it might not.

    Plus, that stock cog better not be too thick for a thin chain. I bet it will work, but never assume so.

    Good luck.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    did anyone else here look at the p2 frame?

    I'm questioning the length of the horizontal drop out.It seems not necessarily enough (compare it to dedicated SS frames such as Surley--deep drop outs). Maybe for certain gear combos it might work...but it might not.

    Plus, that stock cog better not be too thick for a thin chain. I bet it will work, but never assume so.

    Good luck.
    Yep, I checked out the full size picture on their website. It certainly isn't too long, but there are many frames with shorter dropouts, especially road and track frames. It might take a half link (as mentioned) but any gear combo should be doable.

    I have used both 8 and 9 speed chains with two different brands of those budget stamped cogs, one brand being what the OP linked too.

  11. #11
    ss= 800 lb. gorilla
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    man, whatever u do with ya bike, good luck, but thats one sweet looking ride, bro!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    did anyone else here look at the p2 frame?

    I'm questioning the length of the horizontal drop out.It seems not necessarily enough (compare it to dedicated SS frames such as Surley--deep drop outs). Maybe for certain gear combos it might work...but it might not.

    Plus, that stock cog better not be too thick for a thin chain. I bet it will work, but never assume so.

    Good luck.
    I'd bet that the P2 is the same frame as the P1, which comes stock as a singlespeed.

  13. #13
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    nah p2 cro-mo is not the same as p1, it's stocked with gears.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by chenny
    nah p2 cro-mo is not the same as p1, it's stocked with gears.
    i just checked their site too. The P1 and P3 are both set up stock as singlespeeds and the dropouts do not look any different in length

  15. #15
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    Thanks, that is what I was attempting to say.
    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    i just checked their site too. The P1 and P3 are both set up stock as singlespeeds and the dropouts do not look any different in length

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    did anyone else here look at the p2 frame?
    Did anyone notice the front chain guide/ tensioner?
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    Did anyone notice the front chain guide/ tensioner?
    not sure what you're getting at, but those chain guides don't work as chain tensioners for singlespeeds

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    not sure what you're getting at, but those chain guides don't work as chain tensioners for singlespeeds
    I have seen these used to tension a chain. The pulley arms are attached to a plate and this plate is adjustable (you have to remove the crank). If you bypass the top pulley (assuming it's the two pulley variety), you can use the bottom pulley to tension the chain. It takes a little experimentation but you should be able to get it close enough to use the dropouts. BTW, and I could be wrong on this, but the P1 and P2 I saw had slightly different dropouts; the P1 had a true horizontal dropout, but the P2 (it was actually a P3) had a rear entry dropout.
    Last edited by aka brad; 10-25-2009 at 07:09 PM.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

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