Single Speed build, high end or bare bones?- Mtbr.com

View Poll Results: Custom frame?

Voters
50. This poll is closed
  • yes

    24 48.00%
  • no

    26 52.00%
Results 1 to 44 of 44
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    741

    Single Speed build, high end or bare bones?

    I have rode, and now love single speeds. It was a $2 grand dream machine with all top shelf parts. Now I want to buy my own SS and I'm not sure what to buy. I could get an off the rack bike for less than half the price a dream ride. My two other mountain bikes have all top shelf parts I like having quality. I will ride it a least once or twice a week so what do you guys suggest?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    33
    Uhhh...get what feels right for you and what you can afford.
    If you want validation on blowing a nice wad then do it man, or get the off rack bike
    and use the extra cash to ride some place far from home with strange after ride beer.
    Cheers.
    Raw power's got a healing hand
    Raw power can destroy a man
    Raw power is so more than soul
    Got a son called rock and roll


    98 % of all teens do drugs or have tried drugs if you are in the 98 % range copy and paste this in to your Signature

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,591
    It's entitely up to you and what you can afford, but custom frames do tend to ride a whole lot nicer mainly due to the better fit and extra care and attention the build will get if you go to a good builder.

    Whatever you get it'll be a blast!

    If you do decide to get an off the peg number, I'd definitely go with a Niner for 29" wheels or a Salsa on 26".

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Thylacine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,224
    How about a 3 grand dream machine?
    No longer member of the bike industry nor society, so don't hassle me.

  5. #5
    Reviewer/Tester
    Reputation: Rainman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    6,176
    ...or ... a 10 grand dream machine?


    Price is really up to the rider, you can get a nice singlespeed for as little as $500 or as much as your wallet can stretch to.

    A very nice singlespeed can usually be obtained at around $1500.00 that will satisfy most riders. However, if you want ultimate fit, then definitely go for a custom frame from one of the recognised builders.

    Usually, the only problem with custom is the [extended] wait time while it is built.


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Thylacine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,224
    Okay okay.........







    ......5 grand.
    No longer member of the bike industry nor society, so don't hassle me.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: edouble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,672

    though custom is great...

    ( I own 3 of em') look to see if there are any production frames that fit you to a tee. I have a Norco Team Issue 26in steel ht that fits so good, I doubt any custom builder could improve the fit. Its absolutely perfect (too bad its not a 29er) for my body, the only production frame I ive ridden that I can say that about. As a result, it rides as good as any bike I own, custom or not. If you can find such a frame then you can build it up nicely for a lot less than custom. I mean really, these production frames have to fit somebody, right?. That somebody just might be you, a little research will tell you either way.
    EAST COAST
    CLYDESDALE
    DREADLOCKED
    STEEL RIDER

  8. #8
    Got Mojo?
    Reputation: BikeMojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,190
    Quote Originally Posted by hardmtnbiker
    I could get an off the rack bike for less than half the price a dream ride.

    And in the end you would have another "off the shelf bike".

    If you can afford it, getting a custom frame is a very special experience.



    Here is my suggestion, call or email Jay and Jeremy, the SyCip Bros, or Sean and Matt at Soulcraft, Brent at Steelman or any other of the wonderful small builders. Talk to them about what you want, what they can build, what they suggest for your riding style and needs.....

    Just listen to them.




    Then for kicks call up Gary Fisher, to ask him how you his Rig would work for you.
    aLaN AT BikeMojo DOT com

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    371
    i will concur that going custom is a very special experience. not only did i get the greatest bike i've ever ridden i also learned so much about how and why different lenghts and angels fit different people.

    it all comes down to your wallet and your amount of patience. fortunately i had the money to spend and bikes to ride during the wait.

    if you go custom the key is to come up with a workable budget and see what will fit in it. what you don't want to do it find out 3/4 through the process that you're out of money and not finished the build. i went with a Ti frame and moderately priced parts buildup and spent a bit over 4K so i would think with top shelf parts and even just a steel frame you're looking at the same ballpark number. i'm telling you this because if you're going for a top shelf build and plan to buy everything new i think the 2K you mentioned is a little optimistic.
    Last edited by lanceh; 08-31-2006 at 06:41 AM.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    741

    Build options as follows

    Frames, production steel or custom steel
    Forks, rigid or budget suspension
    Headset-CK or Cane Creek Solos
    H-bars- any bargan carbon riser
    Stem- Thomson
    Seatpost-Thomson
    Cranks- RF or Truvtv 180's
    Hubs- CK,DT,Hadley,Stealth,or any high end with instant engagement. I have CK on my other bikes.
    Rims- Mavic 717 disc, or any light disc rim, DT,Bont,Salsa etc..
    Spokes.DT or WS
    Brakes-Hayes Mag or 9's
    Grips- Oury
    Chain- any SS
    Cog- any to match the hub
    pedals-any spd
    As you can see it's at least 2 grand.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: seat_boy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,542
    In both bikes and motorcycles (the other thing I spend my dough on) I've never seen any correlation between money spent and enjoyment received. I've had cheap bikes I've liked and expensive bikes I was indifferent too. It goes the other way too.

    Eric

  12. #12
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,421
    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy
    In both bikes and motorcycles (the other thing I spend my dough on) I've never seen any correlation between money spent and enjoyment received. I've had cheap bikes I've liked and expensive bikes I was indifferent too. It goes the other way too.

    Eric
    You sir have reached to point of enlightenment. I have NEVER finished an epic ride and thought "wow that was fun but it would have been sooo much more fun if my bike cost $3000.00 more". One of the things I really like about cycling and bicycle racing for that matter is that it takes the " I have more money so I'm better than you" factor out of the equation. Just because someone dumps $6000.00 dollars on a bike doesn't Mean they are gonna have a better time riding and it sure ain't going to make them any faster. You definitley can't buy fast on a bike and that's cool.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  13. #13
    Reviewer/Tester
    Reputation: Rainman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    6,176
    You can buy "fast" on a motorcycle, but not usually on a bicycle ... true, mostly.

    Enjoyment is a whole 'nother thing. The enjoyment factor resides within yourself. No amount of money spent on a bicycle can guarantee the enjoyment of riding it ... or not.



    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Joe Sausagehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    732
    While there are custom builders who are priced very competitively, they are often the busiest and therefore slowest. A hand-built but not custom-built frame seems like a worthy compromise to me.

    Personally, I'd love a really nice small-batch production bike like a Spot or an IF; something that delivers custom-shop quality but without the wait time. I'm guessing that 90% of us can find a great fit without going all-out on a purely custom frame.
    "America is the greatest country in the world, but that's a lot like being the prettiest waitress at Denny's."

  15. #15
    Poorly Disguised Poser
    Reputation: unit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,171

    another option....

    Figure out what you like....lets say you really like Surly (just for the sake of this discussion)....Get your surly, buy a spec of parts to build with that really suit you. Then do something to make this bike unique....say.... strip it and paint it YOUR color, may be also shave off the brake bosses and grind it smooth (before you paint obviously). In the end you will have a frame and fork you really like, it will be customized in some small way BY YOU, and to YOUR liking, and painted a color YOU choose.

    If you look around some guys have done some really cool things with off the shelf bikes and they ended up with the ride they like, and a bike that is unlike anyone elses.

    You can also find someone to add stuff to your frame...such as a bottle opener, or something more creative.

    This is a less expensive way to come up with a one of a kind ride.

    I want a totally custom built frame some day....but the cheap steel frame I own rides great, and I am affraid that any other frame might not as much favor with me. I have done some silly and even stupid things to my frame, but in the end, it is mine and I love it.

    Most of all...have fun deciding and building.
    My ego is bigger and better looking than yours.

  16. #16
    i thought it was sticky
    Reputation: ofg3216's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    55
    depends on you. if you happen to have "average" body geometry, and you can find a stock frame set up how you like, you're good to go either way.

    if you are like me and know you want some freaky set up (a 29er with super short stays, but a long top tube), go custom, and strip the parts off your geared bike, you don't need it anymore!!!.

    i would recomend.....
    www.strongframes.com
    www.ingliscycles.com
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DanU's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    62
    Is that green-white a standard paint job or did I see this bike in Stockholm? Very nice colourscheme indeed.
    Kelly deluxe - SSWC06 #25

  18. #18
    i thought it was sticky
    Reputation: ofg3216's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    55
    nope, definately one of a kind at this point, I was in stockholm, ya ya....

    i'm still going on about all those beautiful trails, that place is a singlespeed wet dream. oh yeah, the women were ok too... :-)

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DanU's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    62
    Weeell, if you like the Stockholm trails, you should try the Oslo ones. Take the subway up to 400 meters above the fjord and ride into the wilderness. It's about the same surface and terrain but the topography is quite different with potentially long climbs. Back down again you have lots of technical stuff to try downhill, before coasting down to a café table in the middle of the norwegian capital. Oh, and the girls are just as nice as the swedish ones. I've got me one of my own.
    Kelly deluxe - SSWC06 #25

  20. #20
    Got Mojo?
    Reputation: BikeMojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,190
    Quote Originally Posted by DanU
    Weeell, if you like the Stockholm trails, you should try the Oslo ones. Take the subway up to 400 meters above the fjord and ride into the wilderness. It's about the same surface and terrain but the topography is quite different with potentially long climbs. Back down again you have lots of technical stuff to try downhill, before coasting down to a café table in the middle of the norwegian capital. Oh, and the girls are just as nice as the swedish ones. I've got me one of my own.
    When you talk about fjords....


    When I first saw Gier's video Pining for the Fjords, I just about fell off my chair.

    Increadible stuff.
    aLaN AT BikeMojo DOT com

  21. #21
    |i|
    Reputation: robotkiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    352
    Minor point, but my IF took almost three months


    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Sausagehead
    While there are custom builders who are priced very competitively, they are often the busiest and therefore slowest. A hand-built but not custom-built frame seems like a worthy compromise to me.

    Personally, I'd love a really nice small-batch production bike like a Spot or an IF; something that delivers custom-shop quality but without the wait time. I'm guessing that 90% of us can find a great fit without going all-out on a purely custom frame.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: edouble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,672

    That video is absolutely...

    Quote Originally Posted by BikeMojo
    When you talk about fjords....


    When I first saw Gier's video Pining for the Fjords, I just about fell off my chair.

    Increadible stuff.
    awesome and to come out down by the water, man talk about icing on the cake . I wonder if anyone rides those trails on a ht 29er?
    EAST COAST
    CLYDESDALE
    DREADLOCKED
    STEEL RIDER

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: edouble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,672

    My point exactly...

    Quote Originally Posted by ofg3216
    depends on you. if you happen to have "average" body geometry, and you can find a stock frame set up how you like, you're good to go either way.

    if you are like me and know you want some freaky set up (a 29er with super short stays, but a long top tube), go custom, and strip the parts off your geared bike, you don't need it anymore!!!.

    i would recomend.....
    www.strongframes.com
    www.ingliscycles.com
    If a stock frame will fit you, then I dont see the point in going custom. Unless you want to feel like your bike is better because its custom and cost's more . If bike fit is the most important thing (I believe it is) then what is a custom builder going to give you that a production frame that fits your body wont . Nicer paint?, cleaner welds?, more options?, probably yes to all of those. Better ride quality?, that may or may not be the case, My Ted Wojcik 29er is the only custom bike I have that has a significant edge in that dept. My Norco Team Issue handles better than my Curtlo any day of the week. Not that the Curtlo sucks, it rides very, very well (super stable for a ht) as does my Voodoo Bizango (crazy quick in the tight stuff). The Norco is just an exceptional handling bike (pick an adjective). I got the Norco from the classifieds on this site for $100 bucks more than I paid for the Curtlo frame and $450 for the bizango from a local shop owner. It is the Curtlo's equal at the very least.So dont believe the hype , custom is good only if it fills a need you otherwise cant fill with a production frame.
    EAST COAST
    CLYDESDALE
    DREADLOCKED
    STEEL RIDER

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: the Inbred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,471
    Quote Originally Posted by ofg3216
    depends on you. if you happen to have "average" body geometry, and you can find a stock frame set up how you like, you're good to go either way.

    if you are like me and know you want some freaky set up (a 29er with super short stays, but a long top tube), go custom, and strip the parts off your geared bike, you don't need it anymore!!!.

    i would recomend.....
    www.strongframes.com
    www.ingliscycles.com
    close-up of the lugs?

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DanU's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeMojo
    When you talk about fjords....


    When I first saw Gier's video Pining for the Fjords, I just about fell off my chair.

    Increadible stuff.
    And if you liked that, try Pete Fagerlin's latest Norway film:
    http://www.petefagerlin.com/video_gallery.htm
    The ending is genius.
    Kelly deluxe - SSWC06 #25

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: edouble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,672

    wow, another great film!!!

    [[/B]
    Quote Originally Posted by DanU
    And if you liked that, try Pete Fagerlin's latest Norway film:
    http://www.petefagerlin.com/video_gallery.htm
    The ending is genius.
    not trying to hijack this thread, but those films are off the hook . Im recovering from hip replacement surgery, havent ridden in 5 weeks. These films are the closet I can come to riding. thanks a lot guys! .
    EAST COAST
    CLYDESDALE
    DREADLOCKED
    STEEL RIDER

  27. #27
    i thought it was sticky
    Reputation: ofg3216's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    55
    here's what i've got.. now i've just got to ride good enough to justify the paint...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  28. #28
    Got Mojo?
    Reputation: BikeMojo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,190
    Quote Originally Posted by edouble
    [[/B]

    not trying to hijack this thread, but those films are off the hook . Im recovering from hip replacement surgery, havent ridden in 5 weeks. These films are the closet I can come to riding. thanks a lot guys! .
    Gier (aka Biking Viking) and Pete Fagerlin know one another. And if I am not mistaken, the first trail is the same (perhaps even the same ride).
    aLaN AT BikeMojo DOT com

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: the Inbred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,471
    ah, it's paint. i was about to be super impressed with some damn fine lugs. good looking ride, regardless. one of the nicest Strong frames i've seen.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    741
    I went high-end. A Titus Eleven with a 2008 F100 RLC fork and Hadley Hubs.
    Hayes Carbon 9,Thompson Masterpiece seatpost,WTB saddle,XTR pedals, RaceFace Dues 180mm cranks with Blackspire 32 ring. Wipperman chain, Monkeylite handlebars and Thompson stem. see it on post your SS

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    153
    I have what's probably a one grand (Canadian) dream machine. It's a 1x1. All I want to change is to a cassette hub and discs. The build is totally sensible with no chi-chi parts. Just do what feels right.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    192

    Good job! Bare Bones to High End

    Nice build. I guess you can mark ultimate bike build off your to do list.
    Last edited by frontierwolf; 09-04-2007 at 07:42 PM.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    741
    TY, I do feel like it was worth every penny and I value the craftmenship of precision parts. I have two other bikes with Thompson,King, Hayes,Mavic,Raceface,Easton,Fox, and Salsa parts and maintained they still work as good as new. I also have a Switchblade so I guess I'm a Titus fan too.

  34. #34
    Just hit it with speed
    Reputation: GFisher2001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    479
    Interesting thread for me because I recently got a custom SS and have pondered why the need to drop a couple grand on a rigid SS?

    I do feel a goofy at times riding on a rigid SS knowing one could be had for a quarter of what I bought mine for. Then I look down at a bike in a color I picked, using the material I wanted, with custom features I chose(bottle opener/internal lines/chainhanger/sweet!!) , with a tensioning system that I preferred, that honestly handles exactly what I asked for(maintain high speed handling/increase slow speed handling, increase handling on climbs with technical spots, etc.) and I get over it.

    I am a very strong believer in not needing to have the "best" machine to be the BEST rider.

    For me to rationalize it, I don't smoke, do any expensive drugs, don't gamble, don't go to strip clubs often, I'm single with no kids and got a raise at work around when I put my deposit down. So I just figure this is my addiction and I love every second I'm on the bike. I picked out every part on the bike for a reason (either weight, strength, cost or a combo of the three) all at a reasonable price from the builder which further increases the excitement factor.

    One thing I do regret and it is the only thing I think you could make a strong argument against MY situation is........maybe skimming $500 off in parts (although I went with most of the cheapest stuff the builder offered) would have meant a plane ticket and rental fee for a MTB trip (or Snowboard). Don't worry though I'm starting to save for that as we speak.
    Don't hate on the minivan!!!!!!!

  35. #35
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,806
    Quote Originally Posted by hardmtnbiker
    I have rode, and now love single speeds. It was a $2 grand dream machine with all top shelf parts. Now I want to buy my own SS and I'm not sure what to buy. I could get an off the rack bike for less than half the price a dream ride. My two other mountain bikes have all top shelf parts I like having quality. I will ride it a least once or twice a week so what do you guys suggest?
    Other than the frame and fork, I don't really see much payoff dropping big $ on a ss, but then again I fell the same about geared fs bikes. I guess I have spent a bit on wheels on my main two rides (~400 a pair), but I think that was because it happened one or two parts at a time.

  36. #36
    Clydesdale SSer
    Reputation: SSchlemmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    16
    Dunno if anyone is still reading this thread, but here's my $0.02:

    Unless you have an unusual body morphology, many many many "off-the-shelf" frames will work beautifully for you. Unless you are needing to spend some extra $K's on a custom frame, many many many "off-the-shelf" frames will work delightfully for you. The frame is "the bike" to most people, but the functional differences (ignoring the esthetic value of paint, finish, lugwork, etc.) between a Taiwanese frame and a custom hand-built frame are small. The particulars of what makes a great bike frame were hammered out over the last century - It ain't some proprietary secret held by the bike monks. (If you have dropped $2K or more on a custom hand-built frame, I expect you to disagree with me.)

    What I did:
    I went to a LBS and had them perform a fit-kit. I built my 1x1 with no-expense-spared for everything else and around my body measurements. Burly Clydesdale wheels, White Bros, Thompson bits, Jones H-bar (cable discs, cuz I can't bleed brakes in the weeds). 22lbs. $2400.00 BESTBIKEIEVERRODE.

    YMMV

    (Of course, if you want an ART BIKE, get the custom frame and get a beautiful bottomless paintjob, and hang it on the wall, cuz you're gonna rue every bit of mud, every chip to the paint, scratch and dent that happens. But I want an ART BIKE meself, someday...)
    Last edited by SSchlemmer; 09-12-2007 at 10:56 AM.
    Todd Schlemmer
    Clydesdale, Firefighter, Paramedic, Romantic

  37. #37
    mudnthebloodnthebeer
    Reputation: quaffimodo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    585
    I'm not a big fan of bling for bling's sake, but if a bike's going to be ridden a lot there are a lot of price-point components that just aren't going to get the job done in the long run. Case in point: stamped steel cogs. It's not about cost, it's about value. I'd also mention that you're likely to be far more aware of what's under you on a singlespeed than on anything else. In the immortal words of Lance "you'll know where that extra money went." That would explain stuff in the Moots seatpost end of the spectrum.

    I paid 900 bucks for a new Rig (bare bones) and spent a bit over a thousand more turning it into a bike that I wanted to ride every day (dream machine). The majority of that went into some stupid light wheels that utterly transformed the bike from being merely different than my 26" Vulture into a pretty cool ride in its own right. To me, that was money well spent. My girlfriend on the other hand, upon hearing what the King hubs set me back said: "the middle of your wheels cost more than my whole bike." It's all a matter of perspecitve I guess.
    Also, the streets are full of horizontal dropouts...

    BSNYC

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Thylacine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,224
    Quote Originally Posted by SSchlemmer
    Unless you are needing to spend some extra $K's on a custom frame, many many many "off-the-shelf" frames will work delightfully for you.
    Did you 'need' to have 200 dollar titanium handlebars?

    Quote Originally Posted by SSchlemmer
    The frame is "the bike" to most people.....I built my 1x1 with no-expense-spared for everything else and around my body measurements. Burly Clydesdale wheels, White Bros, Thompson bits, Jones H-bar......$2400.00
    What is it about the ride and performance benefits of the 'art componentry' you have purchased, as opposed to the ride and performance benefits of an 'art frame'?

    Also, you forget that custom bikes aren't always about fit - they're just as much about taste and individuality as they are about the functional requirements. It's the exact same logic you have applied to the componentry, because there's no magic about stems, cranks or handlebars either as they're not a proprietary secret held by monks either.

    The other thing you may not have considered is that many custom builders have wholesale or OEM accounts with those companies you mentioned, meaning they could've saved you the difference between and 'art frame' and a Surly.

    Gawddamn it, it's my wheelbarra' and I'm a pushin' it!
    Last edited by Thylacine; 09-12-2007 at 03:16 PM.
    No longer member of the bike industry nor society, so don't hassle me.

  39. #39
    Clydesdale SSer
    Reputation: SSchlemmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    16
    Good Questions.
    The Ti handlebar solved some comfort issues I had with the original steel HB I spec'd for the bike. Also gave me a little bit of spring at the hands without increasing weight ...and cheaper than a sus fork.

    Everything else was chosen on the basis of strength and simplicity. Keith said it best: "Strong, light, cheap - pick two." At 240 lbs, I am hard on my toys, I chose strong and cheap for the frame, and strong and light for everything else. I could have dropped the cash for a custom frame, but that would have been at odds with my goals for this bike. Incidentally, the only Shimano parts on this bike are the SPD's - No complaints with Shimano, didn't really plan it that way, but that is what happened.

    Don't get me wrong (or misquote me; I qualified my response as being purely about function by ruling out the esthetic value of paint, finish, lugwork, etc.), I appreciate a beautiful bike too. Just sharing how I decided to apportion my SS $ on my fave ride.

    There are custom frame makers out there that spin my wheels (Villin, Vicious come to mind), but I think I'd like to take a class to build my own frame when the time comes ( http://www.lyonsport.com/web/road_bike.html ).
    Last edited by SSchlemmer; 09-12-2007 at 04:10 PM.
    Todd Schlemmer
    Clydesdale, Firefighter, Paramedic, Romantic

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    741
    I paid the HIGH price for the custom and I keep telling myself it was worth it. It's true that I gasp every time I get a scratch on it but that was true even when I bought my first bike. I look at it this way. You can only ride one bike at a time no mater how many you have in your garage. It should be whatever you can afford that gets you on the trail as much as possible.
    [COLOR="Black"]HARDMTNBIKER on Instagram

    Seven Sola SLX ENVE MTN SS
    Sir9 Carbon Niner SS
    #1gearallyear #Iridemtn

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by hardmtnbiker
    I have rode, and now love single speeds. It was a $2 grand dream machine with all top shelf parts. Now I want to buy my own SS and I'm not sure what to buy. I could get an off the rack bike for less than half the price a dream ride. My two other mountain bikes have all top shelf parts I like having quality. I will ride it a least once or twice a week so what do you guys suggest?
    Dude, my singlespeed is an 04 Monocog Flight with a Duke SL fork, lots of paint chips/scratches and bent whent wheels. Everytime I hop on it, it just feels right. Sure, I'd love to have a beautiful "Blinglespeed" but, I assure you, a $2k dream machine isn't going to make you any faster than a $1k machine that just feels right. Besides, all bikes look good when your looking at them from behind. Now, If you can buy some bigger lungs, you'd be getting somewhere.

  42. #42
    Having a nice day!
    Reputation: LoneStar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,322
    I have two off the the shelf bikes (a Rocky Mountain HT and a Ventana FS) that fit me well. I also have a custom SS frame of similar size. The SS is hands down my favorite. And trust me, it isn't because I spent more on it. I think custom builders can tweak the geometry and get creative with tubing to provide a more unique riding bike. Just like good components, a lot of small, incremental improvements really add up to give you a really outstanding riding frame.

  43. #43
    US Army Vet-Airborne 11B
    Reputation: longhaultrucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,033

    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by monocognizant
    Dude, my singlespeed is an 04 Monocog Flight with a Duke SL fork, lots of paint chips/scratches and bent whent wheels. Everytime I hop on it, it just feels right. Sure, I'd love to have a beautiful "Blinglespeed" but, I assure you, a $2k dream machine isn't going to make you any faster than a $1k machine that just feels right. Besides, all bikes look good when your looking at them from behind. Now, If you can buy some bigger lungs, you'd be getting somewhere.
    rite on!

  44. #44
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    In our local race series the two dominant riders in the SS open class, often bested all the geared riders in all age groups of the sport class.
    Both were riding 10+ year old rigid converted bikes, with minimal bling.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.