Setting up the rear wheel- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well Setting up the rear wheel

    Hi Guys,

    I've got 2 questions for you all and while they might sound pretty stupid, I've found myself in a bind.

    I'm really really new to the world of SS (bought a Redline Monocog used off of E-bay less than 3 weeks ago) and I've run into my first snag.

    I got home tonight from work and went for a short ride and ended up flatting my rear wheel. So here I am now trying to figure out:

    1) How to get the rear wheel back on and it stay straight? (I have the Redline Chain Pulls on each side)

    2) How to know if I've got the proper chain tension.

    The rear wheel is built up with a flip flop Redline hub. I have the rear wheel almost centered but then I'll tighten the bolt on the non drive side and the wheel pulls too much. I then go back to tighten the drive side and it won't budge.

    Also, more of the bolt is exposed on the non drive side when I tighten the nut than on the drive side. I hope that made sense.

    Anyways, thanks for the help. I desperately want to ride tomorrow and am hoping to get this fixed (seems like it should be easy but it's just not working for me).

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Paintbucket
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    You really only need one chain tug, on the drive side. When I'm first setting it up, I just pull the wheel back in the D/Os as far as I can by hand and tighten down the axle bolts finger snug on both sides. The drive side tug should be in place. Then tighten the tug's tension bolts so they just hit the back of the D/O, and crank down on the axle bolts, drive side first. Spin the cranks backwards. If they bind the tension bolts need to be backed out; if they spin free the tension bolts need to be tighter. You're shooting for that tightness just before they bind, so just loosen the drive side axle bolt and loosen or tighten the tension bolts a smidge and re-tighten the axle bolt. Check to make sure the wheel is still centered. If not, back off on the non-drive side axle bolt until its about finger snug and push the tire over to the side it needs to be on while snugging the bolt back down.

    Once you've got everything set, to take off the wheel loosen the drive side axle bolt enough so that you can slip the tug to the outside of the D/O enough to push the wheel forward far enough to get the chain off. Then you can pull the wheel back to get it off the bike.

    When its adjusted right, the tug is serving both to keep the wheel from sliding forward and to guide the wheel's placement for correct tension. Finger snug drive side, finger snug off side, wrench on drive side, center wheel, wrench on off side. As the chain stretches you'll need to screw with it, but probably not much.

    Clear as mud? Those damn tensioners look so simple, too....
    Zippy for president

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by wooglin-at-home
    You really only need one chain tug, on the drive side. When I'm first setting it up, I just pull the wheel back in the D/Os as far as I can by hand and tighten down the axle bolts finger snug on both sides. The drive side tug should be in place. Then tighten the tug's tension bolts so they just hit the back of the D/O, and crank down on the axle bolts, drive side first. Spin the cranks backwards. If they bind the tension bolts need to be backed out; if they spin free the tension bolts need to be tighter. You're shooting for that tightness just before they bind, so just loosen the drive side axle bolt and loosen or tighten the tension bolts a smidge and re-tighten the axle bolt. Check to make sure the wheel is still centered. If not, back off on the non-drive side axle bolt until its about finger snug and push the tire over to the side it needs to be on while snugging the bolt back down.

    Once you've got everything set, to take off the wheel loosen the drive side axle bolt enough so that you can slip the tug to the outside of the D/O enough to push the wheel forward far enough to get the chain off. Then you can pull the wheel back to get it off the bike.

    When its adjusted right, the tug is serving both to keep the wheel from sliding forward and to guide the wheel's placement for correct tension. Finger snug drive side, finger snug off side, wrench on drive side, center wheel, wrench on off side. As the chain stretches you'll need to screw with it, but probably not much.

    Clear as mud? Those damn tensioners look so simple, too....
    Thank you for your help! Simple yet frustrating.

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