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  1. #1
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    Selling my turner and going SS

    I'm going to be selling my prized 5spot shortly to give the SS thing a try. I rode the Turner on the Vision Quest last year and hope to do it next year on a SS.



    Since I don't have a great feel for SSing yet, I thought I'd go the more affordable route first before getting a custom frame made up. So here's what I'm thinking about:



    I have a local shop that will credit me retail for the parts I take off so the built is pretty reasonable (~$1500 or so)

    Any thoughts or recommendations? Will this build get me through another VQ? How will it climb compared to the Turner?

    I have a bad history of breaking things and my 5 spot with a pike fork and beefy DH rims has been the only bullet proof system I've come across with my 215lb self. Should I invest in some better rims? I really don't want to hear *ping ping POP* from the rear wheel spokes on a long ride How about the bottom bracket, will it last?

    I also need some advice on what cogs I should get for the rear and what to run up front. In general I have no idea what to do with gearing. I imagine I'll need 3 or 4 rear cogs to play around with? Also, I'm the world's best at breaking chains and cartwheeling thereafter, at least on geared bikes, so do I need to upgrade to a heavy-duty chain?

    Any guesses on the final weight?

    Mucho gracias!
    Last edited by tribune; 08-27-2007 at 11:26 PM.

  2. #2
    011100000110111101101111
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    so it looks like u are just keeping the wheels, frame, fork and handle bars?
    Endless cogs are solid and not too $. I would maybe go for a cheaper ring (salsa?) or even a standard ramped ring until you get ur ratio dialed in. I am running 32x18 running 28mm wide 540g rims and 2.35 highrollers rear, 2.1 spec'd resolutions and i've never felt faster on the uphills (granted my other bike(s) have been 34+lbs dualies).
    If you insist on a 36t front ring, perhaps start off with a 20t cog (more chain wrap for ur size/strength) and move up/down from there.

    I run a pike coil u-turn on my SS and just lower it down to 95mm. Could be a thought for ur SS.

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  3. #3
    Combat Wombat
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    Just my personal opinion, but I would keep the 5 Spot and buy a cheap SS, something like a Redline. I have heard they are pretty solid. Find out first if you can live with a SS as your only ride. By hanging out at the SS forum, it is easy to get the impression that nearly everyone that rides a SS has sold off everything they ever owned with gears. Out in the real world though, where most people I know that ride a SS do not spend much time on MTBR, a SS is usually just part of the stable. I have ridden my SS almost exclusively for the past 2 years, but there are still times and places where a geared FS bike is the most fun.

    Brian

  4. #4
    Out spokin'
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    Word

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianU
    ... I would keep the 5 Spot and buy a cheap SS, something like a Redline. ...
    Brian give good advice, Kemosabe. I guarantee you'll regret letting that Turner go. C'mon, you've got the dough to keep it and score a decent SS, too.

    As for gearing, I recommend you stay away from aluminum rings & cogs. Endless cogs are aluminum. My buddy outweighs you by about 50 lbs., whatever... his 22t Endless cog lasted about 2 months under him. (By the way his FS rig is a Turner, too). Sounds like you're a rider if you do VQ. By rider I mean RIDER. Surly cogs are going to last but they weigh about 3x what a King steel cog weighs (that's my guess, anyway). I have both and the Surlys are chunks. Kings are beautiful and last -- I have 'em in 16t-20t sizes.

    My SS is 26" but if I had it to do over I'd go 29". Get a Redline... don't let that Turner go... you'll hate yourself later.

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  5. #5
    local trails rider
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    I love my SS bike but plan to keep the FS too for variety.
    - gearing: whatever lets you get to the top of most climbs
    - 200 mm rotors? Why?
    - no bashguard? You do not have many tall rocks and other chainring killers around?

  6. #6
    SyT
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    I concour with the BrianU as well, besides, if you break things, the rig will be shambles in short order. Redline will likely tolerate your, uh, "style" better.

  7. #7
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    I would get a cheaper SS and if get addicted then sold the turner. This is what I did actually. After I got hooked on my SS I ve sold my fancy gearie HT and never looked back.
    Last edited by Markleo; 08-29-2007 at 10:52 PM.

  8. #8
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    Though I primarily ride my full RIGID SS, I will NEVER sell the Truth. There are too many places to ride where the SS would suck the fun out of it. Places with long steep climbs usually come with long nasty fun decents, and I have no reason to kill me or my SS. SS is like a warm German Ale in that it is an acquired taste. Don't sell anything until you really "know".

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treybiker
    SS is like a warm German Ale in that it is an acquired taste.
    Germans are known for lagers, not ales.

    Brits are known for ales, and 'warm' is a relative term in that a good ale should be consumed at a higher temp than a lager (more complexity in taste that comes through at higher temps) but it is still cool, ~50 degrees fahrenheit.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    I love my SS bike but plan to keep the FS too for variety.
    - gearing: whatever lets you get to the top of most climbs
    - 200 mm rotors? Why?
    - no bashguard? You do not have many tall rocks and other chainring killers around?
    200mm rotors--why not? I just smoke 160s.

    Around here in socal you really dont need a bash guard. I've had one on the turner and never really needed it.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by SyT
    I concour with the BrianU as well, besides, if you break things, the rig will be shambles in short order. Redline will likely tolerate your, uh, "style" better.
    Are the redline frames really that much stronger? Or are you mixing componentry in there? Since I'll be replacing most of the components I'm really just concerned with frame/fork/wheels/bb.

  12. #12
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    I ride mostly SS but like the dualie for rides like Porc Rim or super-epic rides in the big mountains (or when the legs are shot)... Have both if you can...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2xPneu
    Germans are known for lagers, not ales.

    Brits are known for ales, and 'warm' is a relative term in that a good ale should be consumed at a higher temp than a lager (more complexity in taste that comes through at higher temps) but it is still cool, ~50 degrees fahrenheit.
    My bad. None the less, it ain't like drinking a cold Bud Lite while watching race cars going in counter clock-wise circles.

  14. #14
    keep the shiny side up!
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    the redlines are bombproof!!
    think of them as an oversized bmx bike.
    i have the 29'er monocog and love it.
    plus for $450 it is a steal!

  15. #15
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treybiker
    it ain't like drinking a cold Bud Lite while watching race cars going in counter clock-wise circles.
    Uhhh....
    that must be an acquired taste too.

  16. #16
    My Dog eats poo
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    Convert turner to ss..... win/win then. Cool bike with cool gearing that can be easily converted back to gearie. Plenty of chain tensioners out ther for full sus bikes. Cheaper too if thats an issue.

  17. #17
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    When you have the opportunity to retire a Turner due to drinking the SS kool-aid, it is only right if you use the Turner as a dust collector. After awhile, you will start to cannibalize it and then you will be hooked for good. I have a RFX that hasn't seen daylight since I got my 29er SS. Definitely get some I9 wheels. You won't be disappointed! Enjoy!

  18. #18
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    You've gotten some good advice so far...

    I also have a 5 spot. Sweet ride.

    I bought a Redline 29er Monocog so I could ride to a brewpub or the grocery store and not worry about my bike getting stolen. I wasn't jumping on the 29er or single speed band wagon, its just that the bike was cheap. I was surprised at how much I liked riding the steel pig.

    That was about 5 months ago, and I don't ride the 5 spot anymore. Well, I rarely ride it. I ride the Turner for the trails around Whistler and some local technical trails. But most of the time I grab the single speed. I'm still in shock.

    But I'd recommend you hang on to the 5 spot for at least a year before you decide. You've already taken the hit for the bulk of the depreciation, so in a year if you want to sell its no big loss. But I find its nice to have around.

    I enjoy the contrast of a 5" travel dual-suspension bike with 27 gears and hydraulic disk brakes to a rigid, steel framed, v-brakes that barely work...bike.

  19. #19
    CB2
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    I tried singlespeed for the first time a little over a year ago, and haven't been on a geared mtb since.
    A couple of months ago I saw a smokin' deal on a Soma Juice on ebay.
    I was curious about the whole 29'er thing, but wasn't sure if it would be right for me ( I ride pretty tight East coast singletrack, and I'm only 5'7").
    But the price was right, so I pulled the trigger, and I love it.
    I recently rode my old 26" wheeled bike to see how it stacked up, and it beat the living crap out of me!
    So I guess I'm saying consider a 29'er.
    I also agree with all the comments on the Monocog 29'er; great deal on solid bike.
    As far as gearing, a 51-53" gear works well for me, but everyone is different. I'd bust apart a cassette and pirate a cog or 3 to try different ratios until you find what works best for you, then buy a couple of SS specific cogs, I'd go with steel.
    Chainrings? I've used both stainless steel and Al. With the stainless, I found I needed to run a bash guard, because it bent pretty easy, but it was also a 4 bolt.

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