School me on fixed gear MTB- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 94 of 94
  1. #1
    808+909 = Party Good Time
    Reputation: chumbox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,070

    School me on fixed gear MTB

    I have a fixed gear roadie that I love, so naturally I'm curious... what makes it so good over SS? Can you climb better like the roadie? Do you hit more rocks? Is it quicker? Sell me!! Please!! I want in!! Tell me ya awesome stories...

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ernesto_from_Wisconsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,006
    Quote Originally Posted by chumbox
    I have a fixed gear roadie that I love, so naturally I'm curious... what makes it so good over SS? Can you climb better like the roadie? Do you hit more rocks? Is it quicker? Sell me!! Please!! I want in!! Tell me ya awesome stories...
    The learning curve...you will have to pay waaaay more attention, then you'll be as fluid as the next guy/gal. You can't bomb down hills or hop with ease if you need to.
    The plus side of things, you're much more connected to the ground.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RSW42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,164
    Been riding for years, and I'm always in awe of guys/gals on fixed gear Mountain Bikes....


    (Bowing head)



    .
    .




    .

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    355
    Quote Originally Posted by chumbox
    I have a fixed gear roadie that I love, so naturally I'm curious... what makes it so good over SS? Can you climb better like the roadie? Do you hit more rocks? Is it quicker? Sell me!! Please!! I want in!! Tell me ya awesome stories...
    Depends on your definition of 'good'. I compare it to standard deviations, top of the bell curve is your normal geared ride snesations, kinda 'meh' across the board....ss moves you out one deviation from the norm in both directions; when it's good, it's better, when it's not so good, it's worse. Fixed will move you out to yet another step, when it's good, it's freaking incredible, when it's not so good, it can reallllly slum you out.....greater slum for greater reward...

    answers to other questions: yes, sometimes, overall no.

  5. #5
    i also unicycle
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,043
    it is significantly less fun than unicycling offroad.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    673
    The main thing to learn is the art of lifting the rear wheel to get you cranks positioned where you need them at any given time. I have fun with it, mostly riding alone or with one other person. You don't want to have a newbie wheel sucker behind you until you get the hang of it. I have one of tomi's bolt on cogs, and can go fixie pretty easily. It is very handy to have some trials type skills for hopping around. I have a large shop area, where I ride mine indoors a lot. It is fun to ride tech stuff fixed, at slow speeds. You can even set up cool short tracks in your yard for slow speed fixed fun.
    Do it.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    589
    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusSommers
    The main thing to learn is the art of lifting the rear wheel to get you cranks positioned where you need them at any given time. I have fun with it, mostly riding alone or with one other person. You don't want to have a newbie wheel sucker behind you until you get the hang of it. I have one of tomi's bolt on cogs, and can go fixie pretty easily. It is very handy to have some trials type skills for hopping around. I have a large shop area, where I ride mine indoors a lot. It is fun to ride tech stuff fixed, at slow speeds. You can even set up cool short tracks in your yard for slow speed fixed fun.
    Do it.
    OR, you can learn to flow over stuff and not worry where the cranks are, at least that was my solution. VERY occasionally the cranks are in a really bad position, then everyone gets to watch something funny.

    and the fixie is much faster (and perhaps more fun) in the woods than a uni, at least for me.

    If you are in the Pac NW, come out and play!

    bob
    red-haze
    The more I know the more I know I don't know.
    Let the bike ride the trail, you ride the bike.
    Look where you want to go, not where you don't want to go.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thadthetroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    864

    yep

    It is all i ride now.
    You will be much more "in the moment" with much less margin for error. You will be slower overall and long downhills suck. The "pedal payback" from the wheel is very helpful on tempo type climbs.
    It is really fun if you have a group of fixies but i ride with ss/ers,geareys,squishy`s all the time...
    If you already are a roadie fixer then just make the leap. You already probably have been spanked by forgetting you can`t coast,which is the worst.
    Do it...it`s fun

  9. #9
    Ron
    Ron is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    200
    well if you love your fixie on the road i'd venture to guess that you'd end up loving riding fixed off-road too!...

    but...for me it was an acquired taste and now i'm ADDICTED!


    i dont think that it's better than a freewheeling SS but just another fun way to ride a bike.

    i havent noticed that i climb any better BUT i do run a bigger 60in gear instead of my normal 52in on the freewheel SS on the same trails

    i have hit my pedals a tad more but that hasnt caused a problem really

    i have actually been quicker on one ride i do thats both road & dirt but thats due to the bigger gear on the road sections i'm sure

    So... GO FOR IT MAN!! It's a lot of FUN!!

  10. #10
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
    Reputation: campredcloudbikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    598
    so, do you folks on fixies (mtb or road) do endless rollbacks? Being a former flatland bmxer, that would be one of the big advantages.... rollbacks forever and ever.
    you could even start riding trails backwards, just to throw people off.......

    Somebody should design a hub that is fixie but can be disengaged for coasting in either direction - either fully on fixie or fully off like your chain just came off.... but there could be some odd issues with that system too.....

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fancy Hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    189
    I've never ridden a fixed gear off road myself, but I know a guy who loves it. He goes my "lef-t" on these forum and posts a lot (with lots of pictures) over in "Oregon".

  12. #12
    808+909 = Party Good Time
    Reputation: chumbox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,070
    Ok you guys are really selling me... I have a cheap beat around second MTB so it's prob a great candidate to try this on, and since I love road fixie surely I can't go wrong!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    8
    It seems to me that hitting even a smaller jump would be very difficult on fixed gear??? Or is that something that you just get used to as well. I am not a big jumper, but would like to still be able to hit them.

    I als am thinking of converting an old mtn bike to fixie to try it out, I may be sold too???

    I guess working on bikes in the garage is still cheaper than hitting the bars at night... but just like alchohol, when is enough going to be enough??? !!!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    262
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchman1982
    I guess working on bikes in the garage is still cheaper than hitting the bars at night... but just like alchohol, when is enough going to be enough??? !!!
    Whenever anyone says anything about what I spend on bikes I flatly tell them that its much cheaper (and healthier) than hookers and coke

    -Rob.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    589
    Quote Originally Posted by robcycle
    Whenever anyone says anything about what I spend on bikes I flatly tell them that its much cheaper (and healthier) than hookers and coke

    -Rob.
    um...no...its not...um...cheaper...
    red-haze
    The more I know the more I know I don't know.
    Let the bike ride the trail, you ride the bike.
    Look where you want to go, not where you don't want to go.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    295
    I have a fixed mtb id sell... I rode it a good amount of times but its just not my steeze.
    jesus rides a fixed gear.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,667
    It's definitely different. I like the added control. Your speed is always your choice. I'm a terrible descender, but riding fixed gives me much more control of my rate. I don't feel like I'll go OTB as much.

  18. #18
    Shattering Glass
    Reputation: dash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    705
    If you ride any technical get a ss, if your a cross country guy gal(smooth trails) get the fixed

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    97
    Well, for you fixed-gear MTB crowd, it looks like Surly will release a fixed disc hub:
    https://www.singletrackworld.com/liv...8/d4/d4-56.jpg

  20. #20
    i also unicycle
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,043
    Quote Originally Posted by red-haze.com
    and the fixie is much faster (and perhaps more fun) in the woods than a uni, at least for me.

    no argument on the faster. unless the uni is a 29er or 36er and the fixie is geared low. but on my 24" muni i love rocking flowy tech downhills with medium sized drops in them(18-24 inches). plus i can stop, set up, and do bigger 3-6 foot drops on the uni and trails the thing around on logs and rocks and such if i want. fixie offroad for me combined a lot of the fun of SSing(great!) with the annoying parts of unicycling offroad(pedal strikes, slower than SSing) plus new downsides(slow downhills that i can't go drops on, not that i'm a big freeride hucker or anything), but i can totally see why some people like it.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  21. #21
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,822
    Quote Originally Posted by dash
    If you ride any technical get a ss, if your a cross country guy gal(smooth trails) get the fixed
    Have you ridden a fixed MTB? In technical terrain? More than just a few minutes?

    I feel more comfortable in chunky technical terrain on my bike running fixed than freewheel (it is a rigid 29er). Having that constant contact with the rear wheel with forward or back pressure works very well for me. I can push or lift the pedals (yes clipped in fixed ) as I maneuver over and around the rocks, roots, logs, streams, etc. Maybe because the speed is slower and it becomes more trials type riding, I dunno.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  22. #22
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,822
    Quote Originally Posted by EastCoast
    Well, for you fixed-gear MTB crowd, it looks like Surly will release a fixed disc hub:
    https://www.singletrackworld.com/liv...8/d4/d4-56.jpg
    Oh, thank gawd! Finally someone besides Phil will do one. I have been asking every specialty hub maker for one of these.
    Wooo hooooo! (I changed the tags so it will show.)
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    447
    That hub is sweet! Making me rethink my mostercross/commuter options...

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,064
    why doeez you need rear brake with teh fixed????

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    7
    Max-a-mill: because my mom told me so...

    I ride my mtb fixed because it's one way to make everything more challenging. This is a good thing since my local trails are not very exciting. I enjoy the super-focussed state of mind you get in once you get off road. When I get home my head is just as tired as my legs.

  26. #26
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,822
    Quote Originally Posted by max-a-mill
    why doeez you need rear brake with teh fixed????
    Really steep, long technical downhills get hard to hold the rear wheel with your legs, power over rocks, logs, roots one second, and brake the rear wheel the next. Also the rear wheel wants to slide sideways and pass the front. Not good!

    My experience is that a rear brake gives you just a bit more control and saves your legs for more riding when you have to pedal every single inch with fixed. I used a V-brake rear so I could do a flip flop with my FW and TomiCog (never used the FW, but wanted the option while learning), but then changing wheels from a 22mm rim to a 40mm rim meant I had to completely readjust the V-brake.

    Now I have one wheel with a FW and rotor, one with a SS cassette (clears the rear caliper) hub with a TomiCog bolted on , and I can go from FW SS to fixed SS with a wheel swap.


    My monster/clown/circus wheels with Kris Holm 40mm rims - 4+ lb F wheel/tire; 5.5+ lb rear wheel/tire - gets tough to roll after about 20 miles and 2000 feet of climbing!

    I want a fixed w/rotor lighter wheel for longer steeper technical rides; that Surly hub is the answer, probably with a Stans Arch rim.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  27. #27
    I wasn't Kung Fu fighting
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    152

    Yes, during my off road fixed

    Quote Originally Posted by ernesto_from_Wisconsin
    The learning curve...you will have to pay waaaay more attention, then you'll be as fluid as the next guy/gal. You can't bomb down hills or hop with ease if you need to.
    The plus side of things, you're much more connected to the ground.
    experience, I was much more connected with the ground... especially my knees and arse. They connected with the ground a lot. After I got the hang of it, I decided I'm way too much of an adrenaline junkie to really appreciate it... so I went back to a freewheel.
    Everyone has the right to be stupid, but you are abusing the priveledge.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    335
    wow, do i want that surly hub!!!! I sold my gearie, and am selling my ss with vert dropouts, and bought a ss with horz dropouts just so i can ride fixed mtn. I'm in, I dont care what anyone says, or what you're riding. Too cool. finally my trials and flatland background will work together on the trail.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spastook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    143
    I've been riding seriously for 30 years(now 55 yrs old) and mountain biking since 85. The simplicity of a single in the woods has always interested me and last year I made the plunge. While 1 speeding is great it does have its drawbacks. Gear selection is critical and of course unless your a flatlander you will inevitably have to dismount and run up a hill now and then. But for the most part it's a blast. One accessorie I find helpful that most mountain bikers have abandoned is bar ends. I think the leverage gained from having them on a single is critical. Although perhaps my carpal tunnel issues have some bearing on my need for multiple hand placement. Since installing them I've found myself cleaning way more hills than previously. I currently run a 32/18 which seems perfect for me about 90% of the time. The 10% it's not perfect is 9% hills and maybe 1% not tall enough to keep up on the flats.

  30. #30
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
    Reputation: campredcloudbikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    598

    School me on fixed gear MTB

    are you fixed gear mtbers riding with platform pedals or clipless?
    (I've never actually ridden with clipless, just too much of a bmxer and a cheapskate, haven't used bike shorts either.....)

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    335
    Quote Originally Posted by Spastook
    I've been riding seriously for 30 years(now 55 yrs old) and mountain biking since 85. The simplicity of a single in the woods has always interested me and last year I made the plunge. While 1 speeding is great it does have its drawbacks. Gear selection is critical and of course unless your a flatlander you will inevitably have to dismount and run up a hill now and then. But for the most part it's a blast. One accessorie I find helpful that most mountain bikers have abandoned is bar ends. I think the leverage gained from having them on a single is critical. Although perhaps my carpal tunnel issues have some bearing on my need for multiple hand placement. Since installing them I've found myself cleaning way more hills than previously. I currently run a 32/18 which seems perfect for me about 90% of the time. The 10% it's not perfect is 9% hills and maybe 1% not tall enough to keep up on the flats.
    well said, I must say that in my experience, (keep in mind I am half you are) the 2:1 gearing is pretty ideal, I recommend going lower to start and building up to it, even on climbs, in fact a main argument for singles is climbing. I run fully rigid, and dust my geared buddies up hill. without the option to gear down you are forced to carry momentum and then crank like hell outta the saddle. the end result is a stronger rider and faster climbs. I will say that if it gets really tech or the climb is super long, you may end up dismounting. It is the decent where you wish you had the gears. you spin out and want to go faster.

    to the bmx poster above me: go clipless. I came from bmx also. I ride trials bikes too. Both I ride platforms. The advantages clipped in are undeniable. As soon as my Surly Fixxer shows up I will update you all with my first fixed mtn experience. Yes I will be clipped in, no reason not to be. I am gonna run fully rigid with avid bb5s frt and rear, until I get off my cheeks and buy new levers for my XT hydraulics.

    Bottom line: if you are on a bike having fun, I vow to never criticize your setup. Have fun and enjoy cycling.

  32. #32
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,306
    don't know if there's any really any schooling or convincing. mtn scorching is kind of like ss'ing... you ether "get it" or you don't.

    as one of those who get it i can only say... wowsers! what a way to ride the trail!

    and yes, you should go clipless riding fixed off road unless you absolutely hate your shins/calves and wish to punish them by removing large chunks of flesh from them with your pedals.

    you go down this on flats and you're gonna bleed...

    <embed width="448" height="361" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" src="https://s176.photobucket.com/flash/player.swf?file=https://vid176.photobucket.com/albums/w182/monogod/VIDEO_00003.flv"></embed>
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 2xPneu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    916
    Quote Originally Posted by campredcloudbikes
    are you fixed gear mtbers riding with platform pedals or clipless?
    Platform clipless!

    Time Z Control for me. Clipless is the only way to go offroad fixed, and the platform makes it easy to pick up the pedal as it's flying around after a forced unclip when your pedal smacks a rock or log.

  34. #34
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
    Reputation: campredcloudbikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    598
    I suppose learning fixed and clipless at the same time offroad would be a bad idea.....
    and I'm no stranger to bloody shins after riding flatland bmx for a while.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: asphaltdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    644
    Then I'd advise you to learn riding clipless first, and then go fixed + clipless.

  36. #36
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,363
    Quote Originally Posted by EastCoast
    Well, for you fixed-gear MTB crowd, it looks like Surly will release a fixed disc hub:
    https://www.singletrackworld.com/liv...8/d4/d4-56.jpg
    Now available. Mine is on order. QPB told LBS it is in stock for shore.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  37. #37
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,822
    Quote Originally Posted by wadester
    Now available. Mine is on order. QPB told LBS it is in stock for shore.
    Gack, you're killing me! I looked on Monday and none were there, though listed. Now there are 49 left - they probably had 50 and you got the first. Dang.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dunxster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    20
    Although it is no longer being updated 63XC is a great reference site for all thing fixed offroad - http://www.63xc.com

  39. #39
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,363
    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus
    Gack, you're killing me! I looked on Monday and none were there, though listed. Now there are 49 left - they probably had 50 and you got the first. Dang.
    He shoots, he scores. WooHoo! Now if I can repeat this score on the S3X 3 spd fixie hub!
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  40. #40
    Wolf nipple chips
    Reputation: Cabin Fever's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    504
    In my opinion after a couple of off-road fixed gear rides (thanks to my Eno flip-flop), no harder than simply singlespeeding, on most trails. The only difference is that you can't go fast when descending, and sometimes you have to pay attention to your pedal placement and timing. Meh. I *know* I'll be jumped on for this, but that's fine. I think it takes a lot of the fun away from mountain biking. This is coming from a guy who, over the last 4 years, has put several thousand miles on his fixed gear road bike. I've been riding mountain bikes longer though, and this off-road-fixie thing ain't my bag, baby. If you want to give it a try and don't mind spending the dough to do so, then by all means, try it out.

    You'll probably find yourself in one of two camps afterwards:
    A) Like me where you don't care, or
    B) OMFG IT'S TEH BEST TIHNG EVAR and will develop a huge chip on your shoulder about it.

    my $.01...

  41. #41
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,822
    Quote Originally Posted by Cabin Fever
    You'll probably find yourself in one of two camps afterwards:
    A) Like me where you don't care, or
    B) OMFG IT'S TEH BEST TIHNG EVAR and will develop a huge chip on your shoulder about it.

    my $.01...
    C) Just another way to enjoy riding off road, you can get a more thorough workout in less time, and learn new pedaling and balance skills that transfer to your other MTB bikes.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  42. #42
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,213
    The balance and skill I believe you gain from offroad fixed can only benefit your other riding. IMO

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fixed -N- Fly'n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    12

    .....it's been almost a year!

    .......is there any body out there?! ......or is there some other thread?
    Did chumbox try fixed off-road?
    I've been riding fixed for a couple years.....did about 9 months brakeless - yes off-road Then some folks convinced me - that's insane That was on an old CL freebe converted Mongoose IBOC 26er, I now ride a On One Inbred 29er. I drilled my cog to fit the rear disc brake - mounted on the stock On One Inbred ss hub. I use my legs to brake the rear wheel. V brake on the front.

    Well the way that I see it: Fixed gear & full rigid should be the norm, and a handicap plate should be required for coasting and suspension

    Last weekend I borrowed a Dropped bar urban fixie, was designed to run the Scwhalbe Big Apple 29ers. The bike is a True Fabrication design, chromoly steel . Cody's (Hammerhead bicycles) commuter - It has Surly hubs and Mr. Whirly cranks. The big tires did well off-road, even up some short muddy up hills The gearing was a tough 33x15 .....and rode it pretty much brakeless - due to where the brake lever is mounted It rode real nice! the drops were tough to deal with at times, and a little hard on the wrists. Where I rode was somewhat smooth and easy, around 11 mile loop. Walnut Creek park Austin, Texas.

    .....and yes I post on DR with the same username......it too is a ghost town on the fixed gear mtb subject! Hey aren't we ridding to get exercise and be challenged - go fixed
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails School me on fixed gear MTB-tff.jpg  

    School me on fixed gear MTB-itfffv.jpg  


  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    I have a garage full of bikes of every style, and I ride them all - road, MTB (AM/FS, XC, SS 29'er), 26" BMX, SS Cyclocross, fixed-gear road bike, flatland BMX and a sweet beach cruiser.

    I did the fixed gear MTB thing for a sec and it was fun, but it is definetely not the end-all of MTB'ing. Sometimes it's appropriate to take out the full-suspension MTB, and sometimes (well, most of the time for me) it's appropriate to take out the SS Cyclocross bike. Sometimes, I want to go do some cross-country and sometimes I want the simplicity of my short travel 29'er hardtail.

    I wouldn't say I get any less excercise on a bike just because it has gears or full suspension, and I'm definetely faster on the downhills (especially rock gardens) on certain bikes (i.e. my full suspension bike). As far as climbing, I can't think of any advantage a fixed gear bike has over a normal SS.

    I considered throwing on a fixed cog on my cyclocross bike, but the energy I can reserve flying on downhills allows me to have more strength for other things (like long steep climbs).

    I love riding fixed - it's fun and different and interesting - but I also love having a whole range of bikes to choose from depending on the mood.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    72
    i have been riding fixed on and off road for a while now and like both, actually i rarely ride anything else off road. that said i never understand why people say that they climb faster on fixed. it does force you to pay more attention to the trails and carry momentum the make it up the hill but fixed or freewheel with the same gear i would think you will climb the same. like everyone said downhills are different, cant fly down. jumping is somewhat difficult to get the hang of, or was for me but it can be done.

  46. #46
    Bike Dork
    Reputation: sin3kal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    67
    fixed makes all your trails new again. It's also a great way to keep yourself entertained when riding with dogs or riders new to the sport. Also freaks people out when you are in the solo class for 24 hour races.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bryan_d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    457
    Thought I would chime in,

    I tried out fixed off-road the other day, and was it was entertaining. I rode some trails which were very smooth, so besides the few "oh sh1te moments" when adjusting my shorts, the overall experience was positive.

    I had canti's front and back, but was going slow enough not to use them in the mud that I was riding in.

    I could never see myself riding fixed full-time for mountain bike use, as the rigid SS is challenging enough as it is. And the idea of having to constantly setup for a drop, a small wheelie, or bunny hop due to awkward pedal positions makes me shy away from it.

    I will continue to ride fixed off-road for "scenic" paths however.



    Bryan d
    Just keep pedaling, don't stop pedaling.

  48. #48
    Really I am that slow
    Reputation: SlowerThenSnot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,777
    I've been 95% fixed the past 5 years or so....

    Love it and find i miss the feedback anytime i ride something else...

    http://orfg.blogspot.com/ have a bit of a shin dig happening to try and get some offroad fixers together...

    Happy to answer anything i can
    Read my BLOG!

    just a guy who loves bikes and exploring

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    181
    You are all insane! fixed gear off road ... i thought singlespeed was crazy enough

    Any recommendations for hubs, do i convert a standard mtb one or do I need a Surly?

    Well what the hell I'm 53 now and riding a singlespeed so I might as well loose the rest of my marbles riding fixed

    An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit. Pliny the Younger (62 AD - 114 AD)

    Brian

  50. #50
    Really I am that slow
    Reputation: SlowerThenSnot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,777
    if you already have a single speed and a rear disk hub this is the cheap way to try fixed offroad... http://tomicog.blogspot.com/
    Read my BLOG!

    just a guy who loves bikes and exploring

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    335
    Quote Originally Posted by SlowerThenSnot
    if you already have a single speed and a rear disk hub this is the cheap way to try fixed offroad... http://tomicog.blogspot.com/

    Dude, you look like Sean William Scott, from Role Models.
    no chain no gain.

  52. #52
    Kam
    Kam is offline
    A hopped on pop.
    Reputation: Kam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,397
    i fixed my 29er with a tomi cog....fun bike!!!

    i don't think there is anything i can add to what has been said above....'cept my knees hurt a bit when i ride the bike... probably going to set the saddle back a bit.

    fixed n fly'n....beautiful true fab!!!!

    here are some pics.....enjoy!!!
    <img src=https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4049/4266863092_814a7dea68_b.jpg>

    <img src=https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2709/4266113039_0695dcc845_b.jpg>

    <img src=https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2638/4210298306_7db90ac7bb_b.jpg>
    "forget kings...forget hadleys......they all have crap engagement. just run your bike fixed gear." - FoShizzle

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fat Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,661
    Quote Originally Posted by Fixed -N- Fly'n

    .....and yes I post on DR with the same username......it too is a ghost town on the fixed gear mtb subject! Hey aren't we ridding to get exercise and be challenged - go fixed
    There are a few fixed riders in the area.... although these days I do find myself riding ss a little more

  54. #54
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,822
    Just got my new fixed disc wheel built - Surly hub, Stans Flow 29er tim. Tire and tube seating the yellow tape now. Will get the valve in and tire sealed, cog and lock ring and disc rotor tomorrow. Muddy pixels by this weekend. Yowza!
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    226

    Fixie off road

    I've ridden my SS CX bike off road quite a bit, with the fixed side of the hub in position. I really enjoy. Even in our rocky trails. I just try to anticiapte the pedal/crank arm contact with the rocks and lean into it a little. It's slower, but an entirely new challenge.

    I want to put a Tomi cog on my 29er, but I want a brake rotor that will slide onto the freehub side, so I can relax a little on the steep descents (like one of the earlier posters stated). Anyone making machined rotors that will fit the splines of a freehub?

    Moo

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,699
    Quote Originally Posted by C Cow
    I've ridden my SS CX bike off road quite a bit, with the fixed side of the hub in position. I really enjoy. Even in our rocky trails. I just try to anticiapte the pedal/crank arm contact with the rocks and lean into it a little. It's slower, but an entirely new challenge.

    I want to put a Tomi cog on my 29er, but I want a brake rotor that will slide onto the freehub side, so I can relax a little on the steep descents (like one of the earlier posters stated). Anyone making machined rotors that will fit the splines of a freehub?

    Moo
    Not that I know of, and even if I did know of something I'd recommend against it. I would just build up a wheel around a disc hub with fixed threads instead.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,035
    Quote Originally Posted by C Cow
    I've ridden my SS CX bike off road quite a bit, with the fixed side of the hub in position. I really enjoy. Even in our rocky trails. I just try to anticiapte the pedal/crank arm contact with the rocks and lean into it a little. It's slower, but an entirely new challenge.

    I want to put a Tomi cog on my 29er, but I want a brake rotor that will slide onto the freehub side, so I can relax a little on the steep descents (like one of the earlier posters stated). Anyone making machined rotors that will fit the splines of a freehub?

    Moo
    If you have a Shimano disc hub you can convert it by replacing the freehub with a Surly Fixxer, which allows you to mount a standard fixed cog where the freehub was.

    The only other solution I know of is to buy new wheel with a Surly, Phil, or Paul dedicated fixed-disc hub

  58. #58
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    I rode fixed off road a lot last summer. This was on a SS cross bike. There was another thread about it. It was a really good time. It's a completely different experience and requires a lot of different skills. It's also more of a challenge. Something that I read on here that helped me a lot when riding fixed was instead of going around obstacles, ride right over them. You won't clip your pedals nearly as much, maybe not even at all. Learning how to hop and skip to position your pedals will also help, but that's something you should learn even riding fixed on the road.

    Something that needs to be understood automatically is that there probably aren't any advantages to riding fixed off road (some argue that there aren't any on the road either). It doesn't stop me from doing it because I appreciate it for what it is and I enjoy it. Die hard fixed riders may argue that it is superior, but the reason they find it to be better is because they enjoy it so much, and enjoy the fixed riding style.

    Forget big air and railing the corners, and enjoy a slower, more technical ride. I still need to get a tomicog for my 29er.

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    161
    I had a paragraph here about how locked-in and perfect flowing a fixed drivetrain over obstacles and through twisty singletrack is, but then I realized I could explain it so much quicker...


    Sick fixie skids, dawg.

    And colorways.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    314
    Love riding fixed mtb in techy singletrack. A fun challenge, makes old stale trails fun again.

    My fixed Gary Fisher, has since been retired, running fixed on an Instigator now.

    http://fixedgeargallery.com/2007/nov...rewLeach_2.htm

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    137
    I rode my fixed/free CX bike, mostly fixed, for all of last season, including some decent technical riding. It was a perfect bike to ride to the trail head and the skinny tires were fun on the trails. This year I built up a SS 26er to compliment it after having sold my hardtail last year. Have ridden it just a couple times now, not enough cause the ever falling snow. I however on those first few rides started missing the fixed connection and bought a free hub/disc wheelset to make a flip flop for this bike too. I have XTR V brakes front and rear, and unless I decide to never flip my wheel back to free, that rear brake will just hang out on the bike. Now to decide what size tomicog I want to order. . .

  62. #62
    master blaster
    Reputation: veloreality's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,149
    ive been riding my cx bike fixed with 32x19 and 32mm tires. thinking of converting my 29er with 1.9 tires to fixed but im not sure what ratio to go with.
    are you all using the same ratios as when frewheeling?

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,035
    Quote Originally Posted by veloreality
    ive been riding my cx bike fixed with 32x19 and 32mm tires. thinking of converting my 29er with 1.9 tires to fixed but im not sure what ratio to go with.
    are you all using the same ratios as when frewheeling?
    i did because it made the swap and setup easier, but now I think I would rather have a slightly higher ratio so there is less crazy spinning on downhills as well as more braking leverage from the cranks

  64. #64
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,822
    Yes, 20T (32 CR) for the same reasons @boomn states, simple swap.

    Now that I have a slot frame, I would drop a tooth or two, depending on terrain, again same reasons for easier leg braking, plus the flywheel effect on fixed climbing, provided you can keep momentum. On really tough grind climbs the same ratio works for me, and just tough it out on the descent.

    And that is really why I built a dedicated wheel with a Surly fixed disc hub, so the brake can relieve my legs coming down.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  65. #65
    master blaster
    Reputation: veloreality's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,149
    wondering how bad of an idea this is

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    335
    definatly what those guys said. Same is good for flip flop, slightly taller/higher gear might be more desirable for a pure fix mtn only bike, but flipping gives you two bikes for one frame.
    I like that. Also like sloclaus, I choose to run brakes, no reason to destroy your knees.
    no chain no gain.

  67. #67
    master blaster
    Reputation: veloreality's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,149
    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    definatly what those guys said. Same is good for flip flop, slightly taller/higher gear might be more desirable for a pure fix mtn only bike, but flipping gives you two bikes for one frame.
    I like that. Also like sloclaus, I choose to run brakes, no reason to destroy your knees.
    i use my rear brake also on my cx fixed bike so id like the work that out.
    thanks for the tips.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    681
    wondering how bad of an idea this is
    I'd say quite, quite bad. Using a geared cog for a freewheeling ss is not recommended, and on a fix, with force being exerted forwards and backwards, it looks like an accident waiting to happen. There's a reason why fixed gear cogs have had massive teeth for over a century now.
    If you insist on trying it, though, please run both front and rear brakes. I'd hate to lose a forum member.

  69. #69
    master blaster
    Reputation: veloreality's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,149
    Quote Originally Posted by Orkje
    I'd say quite, quite bad. Using a geared cog for a freewheeling ss is not recommended, and on a fix, with force being exerted forwards and backwards, it looks like an accident waiting to happen. There's a reason why fixed gear cogs have had massive teeth for over a century now.
    If you insist on trying it, though, please run both front and rear brakes. I'd hate to lose a forum member.
    wasnt really going to ride it. wheel was in the corner and cog was on the dresser in front of me as i was contemplating buying a tomi cog ha funny how three bolts match up perfect.

  70. #70
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    I went two teeth higher when choosing my fixed ratio for my 29er. I ride 32x20 free and 32x18 fixed. Tomicogs are great, but not having a rear brake really sucked for some of the steep decents I have around here. My bike is currently in free only mode with the rear disc back on but I've been thinking that I may need to give fixed another go.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,035
    Quote Originally Posted by CycleAddict
    I went two teeth higher when choosing my fixed ratio for my 29er. I ride 32x20 free and 32x18 fixed. Tomicogs are great, but not having a rear brake really sucked for some of the steep decents I have around here. My bike is currently in free only mode with the rear disc back on but I've been thinking that I may need to give fixed another go.
    ditto to all of that. I think it might be a good excuse for me to try building my first wheel

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr.Bee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    221
    I have a good time on my fixed mtb. I ride no brakes but then I don't do any major climbs.
    It's good stuff for me like BMX in the 80's I can do it all day I'll ride 20-30 miles on a bike path to shred some dirt jumps/trails hit up a nice mex food place for burritos and beer then home.
    I couldn't do half that on a freewheel fixed just gets you going and you just go.

    Some footy on one of my local single tracks.

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation: brauluver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    24
    recent convert to this discipline and loving it!
    Rockin it Fixed On my Iron Horse In Adelaide ,South Australia

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...17#post8293017

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42

    new at this

    ive been sold on mountain biking, and im sold on fixies. but i want to make my mountain bike fixed gear but have no real amount of money to do it with.
    i already need a new chain, but im wondering if i can take the cassete and take the screw posts out and use just one of the gears.
    but i havent figured out yet how to make it not coast. if it coasts that means you have no real fixed gear because it would have no reverse or anything like that
    so what do i need to do and what can i do to keep it cheap instead of 400 dollar cranksets and 300 dollar aerospoke wheels and stuff

  75. #75
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,198
    Quote Originally Posted by oud25 View Post
    ive been sold on mountain biking, and im sold on fixies. but i want to make my mountain bike fixed gear but have no real amount of money to do it with.
    i already need a new chain, but im wondering if i can take the cassete and take the screw posts out and use just one of the gears.
    but i havent figured out yet how to make it not coast. if it coasts that means you have no real fixed gear because it would have no reverse or anything like that
    so what do i need to do and what can i do to keep it cheap instead of 400 dollar cranksets and 300 dollar aerospoke wheels and stuff


    If you have a disc rear wheel you can use a Tomicog, just google it. That will get you going fixed on the cheap.

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    If you have a disc rear wheel you can use a Tomicog, just google it. That will get you going fixed on the cheap.
    so will that stop it from coasting or is that the axel or hub or something?

  77. #77
    Phobia of petting zoos.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    971
    To save you googling it, because it's clearly too much trouble, it's a cog that replaces your disc rotor. You bolt the cog in place of the rotor and flip the wheel around so the "left" side is now on the drive side.

    Clearly you don't get to run a rear brake because you no longer have a disc rotor (unless you have v-brake mounts as well).

    Let me google that for you

    Grumps

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spastook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    143
    First of all the vast majority of us who singlepeed offroad DO NOT have a "fixed gear" we run a singlespeed that coasts. Yes you can use one of your cogs you just need to buy a spacer kit ($30)

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ne_dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by oud25 View Post
    ive been sold on mountain biking, and im sold on fixies. but i want to make my mountain bike fixed gear but have no real amount of money to do it with.
    i already need a new chain, but im wondering if i can take the cassete and take the screw posts out and use just one of the gears.
    but i havent figured out yet how to make it not coast. if it coasts that means you have no real fixed gear because it would have no reverse or anything like that
    so what do i need to do and what can i do to keep it cheap instead of 400 dollar cranksets and 300 dollar aerospoke wheels and stuff

    Crap the Hipster are coming, at least they don't wear helmets so they should only be around for a short time.

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by ne_dan View Post
    Crap the Hipster are coming, at least they don't wear helmets so they should only be around for a short time.
    actually im not a hipster at all
    i hate most indy music i wear dull colors matching socks. i actually wear stuff that will keep me warm instead of a stupid wind breaker.
    i only started researching bikes a few days ago so i used their terms for them cause thats what they are called
    i just didnt think it was fair to my mountain bike to be sitting there with flat tires and rusted chain and cranks.
    so if you could help that would be great

  81. #81
    Phobia of petting zoos.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    971
    If you're "sold on mountain biking" (however your mountain bike sits about unloved) then my first suggestion would be to get your bike sorted out and ride it with gears. Get some mountain biking legs and the basic skillset in place before you try single speed.

    I mean, there's nothing to stop you going straight to single speed, but take your time giving regular mountain biking a go to flatten the learning curve.

    As for riding MTB fixed, it's a lot different to riding fixed on the road. Rocks, obstacles and stuff. It really helps to have your MTB skills and single speed skills down as second nature before trying fixed gear MTB.

    Mountain biking is about jumping obstacles, not bandwagons.

    Grumps

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    If you're "sold on mountain biking" (however your mountain bike sits about unloved) then my first suggestion would be to get your bike sorted out and ride it with gears. Get some mountain biking legs and the basic skillset in place before you try single speed.

    I mean, there's nothing to stop you going straight to single speed, but take your time giving regular mountain biking a go to flatten the learning curve.

    As for riding MTB fixed, it's a lot different to riding fixed on the road. Rocks, obstacles and stuff. It really helps to have your MTB skills and single speed skills down as second nature before trying fixed gear MTB.

    Mountain biking is about jumping obstacles, not bandwagons.

    Grumps
    i am in the city now but i lived in the country for 10 years so im used to biking its just i never did a fixed bike yet
    the reason its unused is because i have my dads nicer one here too so i just use it when i need to go out somewhere
    i wish i had a good bike to ride that was my own thats why im asking advice on how to make my bike into a fixed so i can repair it but not have a ton of maintenance

  83. #83
    Phobia of petting zoos.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    971
    Quote Originally Posted by oud25 View Post
    i am in the city now but i lived in the country for 10 years so im used to biking its just i never did a fixed bike yet
    the reason its unused is because i have my dads nicer one here too so i just use it when i need to go out somewhere
    i wish i had a good bike to ride that was my own thats why im asking advice on how to make my bike into a fixed so i can repair it but not have a ton of maintenance
    Cool. Might be a good place to start by telling us what you have now, what the set up is (ie: drivetrain components, number of gears, hub model) and we can point in the right direction for setting up a single speed.

    Actually, maybe start a new thread so this one doesn't get hijacked off topic.

    But I do think a freewheel single speed is a better place to start than fixed.

    Grumps

  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    Cool. Might be a good place to start by telling us what you have now, what the set up is (ie: drivetrain components, number of gears, hub model) and we can point in the right direction for setting up a single speed.

    Actually, maybe start a new thread so this one doesn't get hijacked off topic.

    But I do think a freewheel single speed is a better place to start than fixed.

    Grumps
    as of right now it is all stock, nothing change about it. im not sure how many gears it is but the reason i wanted a fixed gear was because my brakes are rusted up and the bads are worn out a little too. the hub is original so just some cheap thing that came on it
    but i cant start a new thread since im so new i have to have a certain amount of posts :/

  85. #85
    Dr Gadget is IN
    Reputation: wadester's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,363
    Quote Originally Posted by oud25 View Post
    as of right now it is all stock, nothing change about it. im not sure how many gears it is but the reason i wanted a fixed gear was because my brakes are rusted up and the bads are worn out a little too. the hub is original so just some cheap thing that came on it
    but i cant start a new thread since im so new i have to have a certain amount of posts :/
    Okay, so you've got a rusty old multispeed mtb - and you want to go fixed gear. There are two ways to make your current hub work:

    1) Tomicog - which is a cog that bolts to a disc brake boss. If you've got disc brakes, you can use this. Lots of info: search google for - site:forums.mtbr.com tomicog to find lots of threads. Or go to the source: TomiCOGs $30 + S&H.

    2) Surly Fixxer - replaces the freehub, allows use of standard fixed cogs. $65, needs cog $20 and lockring $13 +S&H

    Which way do your drops face? Gotta tension the chain somehow.

    Vertical/down? Look up magic gear - get ready to calculate or do trial&error ($$for cog/ring sets to try). Tensioner? -No. Fixed forces will mangle it if there's room for the chain to escape - may work for taking up minor slack.

    Horizontal (front or rear facing) you're good.

    EDIT: just remembered an excellent source for you:
    63xc.com--The Offroad Fixed Gear Site
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  86. #86
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,198
    Quote Originally Posted by wadester View Post
    Okay, so you've got a rusty old multispeed mtb - and you want to go fixed gear. There are two ways to make your current hub work:

    1) Tomicog - which is a cog that bolts to a disc brake boss. If you've got disc brakes, you can use this. Lots of info: search google for - site:forums.mtbr.com tomicog to find lots of threads. Or go to the source: TomiCOGs $30 + S&H.

    2) Surly Fixxer - replaces the freehub, allows use of standard fixed cogs. $65, needs cog $20 and lockring $13 +S&H

    Which way do your drops face? Gotta tension the chain somehow.

    Vertical/down? Look up magic gear - get ready to calculate or do trial&error ($$for cog/ring sets to try). Tensioner? -No. Fixed forces will mangle it if there's room for the chain to escape - may work for taking up minor slack.

    Horizontal (front or rear facing) you're good.

    EDIT: just remembered an excellent source for you:
    63xc.com--The Offroad Fixed Gear Site



    Informative post, I would only add to it the possibility of using a ghost gear as a form of chain tension.

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,795
    for a coasting single-speed bike, you can use just about any frame with a pulley-type chain tensioner. but if you want to go fixed, a tensioner will not work. you need an eccentric BB, an eccentric hub, or track-ends (aka horizontal dropouts). and if you want to put a Tomicog on it, you need a disc-ready hub.

    you could build a wheel based around a White Industries Eno hub that has provisions for a track cog and use that on standard dropouts too.

    if your brakes are "rusted out," and our pads are worn down, I think you need to consider doing some basic maintenance and replace the parts you need to make the bike safe first, then think about modifying it. in many cases, converting a mediocre mtb to a single-speed is cheap and easy, but that assumes the bike is already in decent shape. can you post a photo of the bike?

    someone please lock this thread until oud25 starts a separate thread.

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42
    [QUOTE=wadester;8882259]Okay, so you've got a rusty old multispeed mtb - and you want to go fixed gear. There are two ways to make your current hub work:

    1) Tomicog - which is a cog that bolts to a disc brake boss. If you've got disc brakes, you can use this. Lots of info: search google for - site:forums.mtbr.com tomicog to find lots of threads. Or go to the source: $30 + S&H.

    2) Surly Fixxer - replaces the freehub, allows use of standard fixed cogs. $65, needs cog $20 and lockring $13 +S&H

    Which way do your drops face? Gotta tension the chain somehow.

    Vertical/down? Look up magic gear - get ready to calculate or do trial&error ($$for cog/ring sets to try). Tensioner? -No. Fixed forces will mangle it if there's room for the chain to escape - may work for taking up minor slack.

    Horizontal (front or rear facing) you're good.

    EDIT: just remembered an excellent source for you:


    mine goes at about a 5 oclock angle
    so the tomi gear will make my stock mountain bike fixed without having to replace the wheel hub or anything?
    i thought the hub was what made the bike coast because of the bearings inside

  89. #89
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,198
    [QUOTE=oud25;8882498]
    Quote Originally Posted by wadester View Post
    Okay, so you've got a rusty old multispeed mtb - and you want to go fixed gear. There are two ways to make your current hub work:

    1) Tomicog - which is a cog that bolts to a disc brake boss. If you've got disc brakes, you can use this. Lots of info: search google for - site:forums.mtbr.com tomicog to find lots of threads. Or go to the source: $30 + S&H.

    2) Surly Fixxer - replaces the freehub, allows use of standard fixed cogs. $65, needs cog $20 and lockring $13 +S&H

    Which way do your drops face? Gotta tension the chain somehow.

    Vertical/down? Look up magic gear - get ready to calculate or do trial&error ($$for cog/ring sets to try). Tensioner? -No. Fixed forces will mangle it if there's room for the chain to escape - may work for taking up minor slack.

    Horizontal (front or rear facing) you're good.

    EDIT: just remembered an excellent source for you:


    mine goes at about a 5 oclock angle
    so the tomi gear will make my stock mountain bike fixed without having to replace the wheel hub or anything? If you have a disc brake hub to affix it to.


    i thought the hub was what made the bike coast because of the bearings inside
    That is the function of the free or cassette hub not the wheel hub. I suggest that you read up on fixed gear before you commit to this or better yet just single speed it and forget about fixed gear. Respectfully, AZ.

  90. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42
    fine, ill start my own thread for the people that actually want to help me instead of freak out on me for trying to learn and fix my bike. all i had to do was get 5 posts so i could actually create a thread in the first place

  91. #91
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,822

    School me on fixed gear MTB

    Title of the thread is

    School me on fixed gear MTB

    Not sure why some are getting knickers in a twist!
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Quote Originally Posted by oud25 View Post
    fine, ill start my own thread for the people that actually want to help me instead of freak out on me for trying to learn and fix my bike. all i had to do was get 5 posts so i could actually create a thread in the first place
    I read the posts and everybody has been VERY helpful - you can't blame them if you don't understand. Answer these questions:

    1. Do you have a disc brake?
    2. Do you have a free hub or a thread-on freewheel hub?
    3. Do your dropouts look anything like these?






    What AZ.MTNS is telling you is you should learn about what you're getting into before getting into it. Go here and read.

    Fixed Gear Conversions

    Everybody has been ultra cool and now you're sounding young and annoying. LEARN with SHELDON BROWN. Starting a new thread will get you the same answers.

  93. #93
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    I read the posts and everybody has been VERY helpful - you can't blame them if you don't understand. Answer these questions:

    1. Do you have a disc brake?
    2. Do you have a free hub or a thread-on freewheel hub?
    3. Do your dropouts look anything like these?

    What AZ.MTNS is telling you is you should learn about what you're getting into before getting into it. Go here and read.



    Everybody has been ultra cool and now you're sounding young and annoying. LEARN with SHELDON BROWN. Starting a new thread will get you the same answers.
    quite a few of them have yes but a few also just want me to start my own thread when i couldnt yet.
    my brakes are on the top attached the the frame, and pinch the rim.
    im not sure about what hub i have i dont know what the difference is yet so i will have to look that up
    and my drop is the first one, the drop at a 5 o'clock

  94. #94
    Phobia of petting zoos.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    971
    Quote Originally Posted by oud25 View Post
    fine, ill start my own thread for the people that actually want to help me instead of freak out on me for trying to learn and fix my bike. all i had to do was get 5 posts so i could actually create a thread in the first place
    Nobody is freaking out on you for wanting to learn stuff and set up your bike.

    All I'm saying, as are others, is that this thread is going to get messy when it has a sub-thread within it about your bike and your learning curve. You know, like one of crap movies about drifitng cars that for some reason has a romantic subplot - yech.

    Let me put it this way. You are important to us. Your bike is important to us. Getting you the right advice is important to us. Those things are so important that it deserves its own thread.

    I see you've started that thread, so let's just draw a line under this.

    Peace.

    Grumps

Members who have read this thread: 5

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.