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Thread: Rigid Techniqe?

  1. #1
    Not me
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    New question here. Rigid Techniqe?

    I am riding my Bianchi SASS fully rigid for the time being. I might get a suspension fork at some point but am enjoying he challenge and efficiency of a rigid fork.

    I've gotten to the point where I now feel I can try out some more technical singletrack. ?With the Zoke Z1 I have on my geared bike I'm used to being able to just plow over rocks, but I've noticed that, unless I have a lot of momentum, I come to a scretching halt when I hit stuff on my rigid fork that I would easily roll over on my suspension fork.

    Any tips of rigid riding technique? I'm especially thinking of navigating narrow, rocky, up hill single track. I don't want to go to a suspension fork just because I lack the skills to do it rigid. I'd rather go with suspension for comfort and increased options. Then again, maybe the whole point is that suspension forks allow you to get over stuff easier.

    Thanks for the tips!

    surfpriest

  2. #2
    KgB
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    ride lightly

    try to just float over the top of stuff,keep pedaling and moving your arms,which are now shocks.
    You learn to pick different lines also.
    I've been inside too long.

  3. #3
    Zippy, the wonder bike
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    Work the rigid fork to your advantage. When in the technical stuff take it slow, pick good lines that are easy, don't aim for the hard stuff and pay attention to the terrain. When your riding down fast twisty single track you get no flex at all with a rigid fork, the bike accelerates beautifully and just flys into the corners.

  4. #4
    Medium?
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    1 reason I ride rigid

    Is that I got bored of just plowing over everything. Now I'm back to the old days of having to pick the best line to make it over and around stuff. I use lots more upper body to work the bike over big stuff.

  5. #5
    JDZ
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    stay loose and anticipate

    Keep your arms and legs loose so that they can compress when you hit bumps. Grip the bars just hard enough to maintain control. Watch the terrain and move your weight back and forth for rocks and dips. Anticipation is an advantage that a shock doesn't have. Resist the urge to hit a rocky climb as fast as you can. Going too fast can knock you off your line and require handling corrections that sap too much energy.

  6. #6
    "Mr. Britannica"
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    Agree w/others... ride smooth, light, stay loose, pick a smooth line. You don't really want to be bashing through stuff.

  7. #7
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    I always found the hardest part of riding rigid to be predicting where the back tire would end up. That was a constant challenge because it pissed me off to make it around a rock or whatever with the front wheel only to bash the side of the rim against the same rock with the back wheel.

    Otherwise, I was told early on (and I started riding before suspension) to follow the path water would if it was flowing down the trail. Not as easy to picture when climbing but it can help.

  8. #8
    KMA
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    Ditto on what everyone is saying ....

    1.) Stay loose and suck up the bumps with your knees and elbows. Just like a good bump skier.
    2.) Pick your lines in advance.
    3.) Watch and focus on your lines and not the obstacles.
    4.) Shift weight according to the grade.

    Be carefull with the front brake on steep drop offs.

    Keep smiling and have a blast!!!!

  9. #9
    paintbucket
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    I've always found it useful to "think" the front end up over obstacles. Its not so much popping a wheelie as getting the wheel light. The other thing I do is just try to graze the tops of obstacles if I do have to get the front up. The less energy I use lifting the front the more I've got for later.

    Another tip, related to those I guess is that I often put the rear wheel on the smoothest line rather than the front because I can unweight the front so much easier.
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  10. #10
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    picking up on that " back wheel" thing . . . . .

    i think awareness of where BOTH wheels are is important when riding rigid. do this:

    find a sizable rock, say bowling ball sized - certainly a decent obstacle to avoid.

    ride slowly up to said raock, and then sorta "loop" the front wheel out and around the rock, while your back wheel cuts inside the rock.

    notice thet you have just avoided a very big rock with ONE wheel going one way around it, the OTHER wheel going the other way (!!!).

    now, use this phenomenon is your singletrack riding. there are numerous variations on the theme.

  11. #11
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    Commit to a line, keep your momentum high as possible, pull up on bars while applying pressure to pedals, follow through after your front wheel clears and your back wheel hits obstacle and ratchet back if necessary to keep your pedal from striking obstacle. Use arms and legs to absorb shock. Scan forward at all times so you can be prepared for next obstacle, always keeping momentum is key. Never go back to suspension. Ti fork helps take edge off. I'm running a Spicer and it's a thing of beauty.
    Quote Originally Posted by Surfpriest
    I am riding my Bianchi SASS fully rigid for the time being. I might get a suspension fork at some point but am enjoying he challenge and efficiency of a rigid fork.

    I've gotten to the point where I now feel I can try out some more technical singletrack. ?With the Zoke Z1 I have on my geared bike I'm used to being able to just plow over rocks, but I've noticed that, unless I have a lot of momentum, I come to a scretching halt when I hit stuff on my rigid fork that I would easily roll over on my suspension fork.

    Any tips of rigid riding technique? I'm especially thinking of navigating narrow, rocky, up hill single track. I don't want to go to a suspension fork just because I lack the skills to do it rigid. I'd rather go with suspension for comfort and increased options. Then again, maybe the whole point is that suspension forks allow you to get over stuff easier.

    Thanks for the tips!

    surfpriest

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