Ride Report: Roaring River Region, oRegon- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Ride Report: Roaring River Region, oRegon

    Here's the latest segment in my ongoing quest to ride little-used trails in the Mt. Hood area that may become part of a proposed Wilderness bill. Background and details of my previous forays here: https://forums.mtbr.com/singlespeed/pics-weekends-struggle-sand-52088.html. I'm including specific trail names and numbers for anyone who's interested in checking out the terrain themselves.

    Our destination is what I'll call the Roaring River plateau, an area of mostly 4000-5000' elevation. It includes a number of small subalpine meadows and lakes, connected by a network of bike-legal trails. It's a pretty lightly used area considering that it's only a 75 mile drive from Portland, and to be honest I'd never noticed it on the map even though I spend a lot of time looking at maps.

    Our starting point Hideaway Lake campground, an aptly named campground that's nearly empty on this Saturday morning. The campground is at 4000', so we avoid a nasty 3000' climb that I've heard of other bikers making in order to access this area. Despite an ugly weather forecast that calls for cold weather and heavy rain, our ride starts out sunny. My riding partner, Eric, and I head down road 4830 and are treated to a decent view encompassing "Mr. Jefferson" and even the Three Sisters:



    We hop off the gravel onto Rimrock trail #704, a somewhat overgrown and fairly technical track that climbs 700 feet over Mt. Mitchell in its first half mile or so. Needless to say, we walk most of this, speculating on how much fun it would be as a downhill and wondering if we should have done our loop the other direction. It would be great to be here in huckleberry season, although the climb would take 3 times as long. Anyway, we soon top out and hit a 2-mile downhill at a near-perfect perfect grade though lovely forest. The lightly-used tread shown here is typical:



    After another short stretch of gravel road, we enter a large area of interconnected meadows. Here's one:



    A couple minutes later Richie discovered this little forest inhabitant, about 1" long. Fortunately he did not eat it:



    The next mile or so follows a very rocky streambed to Cache Meadow. It was barely rideable, but would be easier in the other direction due to the slight uphill grade. The sign marking Cache Meadow has been there a long time:



    We head over Frazier Mountain The weather has gone from sunny to cloudy to foggy. We've overdressed, expecting rain, so we don't mind. Well, except it would be nice to take in the view from here to Shellrock Lake 600' below. We'll see this talus slope from the bottom later:



    We cruise through Frazier Turnaround and Frazier Fork campgrounds, not full but with some definite hunter activity going on. We head down trail #510 to do an out-and-back towards Shining Lake. The name of the lake, the weather and the fact that it's October make us start thinking about Jack Nicholson, but he doesn't make an appearance. It turns out to be an old logging road and not a trail, but it's a nice cruise. On some other day, it would have a nice view over the Roaring River 2000' below:



    We decide not to make the final steep descent to Shining Lake, since we don't feel like climbing back up it and we're already looking at a pretty long day. It's a lovely trail though, lined with rhododendrons. Would be nice to be here in June:



    Backtracking to the Frazier campgrounds, we resume our loop with a very technical (barely rideable, even downhill) descent on Shellrock Lake trail #700. It's tough but fun. Here's one of the easier sections:



    That talus slope we traversed earlier drops right into Shellrock Lake. Richie's been slowing down the last few miles, but he's instant high-energy dog again - just add water! - when we get to the lake. Too lovely not to indulge in some fetch time:



    One interesting aspect of this ride is that it featured more mushrooms than I've ever seen anywhere. Every conceivable variety - including chanterelles - was represented, and they were everywhere. Here's one of the weirder ones, growing on this dead snag:



    From here, we had a 1.5 mile downhill that was simply too perfect and flowy to stop and interrupt for photo-ops. Sorry, you'll have to go and ride it yourself to see it.

    Eric and I both had high expectations for this area after close inspection of the maps, and those expectations were exceeded. I wouldn't miss the trails I explored 2 weeks ago if they were incorporated into Wilderness. I would miss these. I sure hope I get another chance to ride them, and maybe explore trails 512 and 517 out towards Serene Lake and Grouse Point. Not only were these great trails (mostly intermediate, with some advanced sections that some intermediate riders would have to walk), but they were quiet. We only encountered 5 people (3 hunters and 2 hikers) in 23 miles of riding. Definitely get out and ride these if you get the chance.

    - Dan
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 10-17-2004 at 08:06 PM.

  2. #2
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    Thanks again for another...

    Great post Dan,
    I love riding in Bend, but I know I have a lot more of Oregon to explore. Thanks for the great pictures and details. Richie looks like a rock star, I like his Ruf-wear vest it's stylish and responsible. Thanks for helping to keep trails alive.
    Jefe'
    ' Bend's dirtiest Acupuncturist '

    bendoregonsinglespeeders

    teamwebcyclery

  3. #3
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    Dan-

    Thanks for the vicarious adventure. I get to travel and ride quite a bit and it's rare for me to oooh or ahhh too much at www photos, but the shot of the duff covered skinny trail made me miss the PNW. Must make plans to get back there soon...

    Oh yeah--Happy Dog!

    MC

  4. #4
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    Roaring River Trails

    Quote Originally Posted by GlowBoy
    Here's the latest segment in my ongoing quest to ride little-used trails in the Mt. Hood area that may become part of a proposed Wilderness bill. Background and details of my previous forays here: https://forums.mtbr.com/singlespeed/pics-weekends-struggle-sand-52088.html. I'm including specific trail names and numbers for anyone who's interested in checking out the terrain themselves.

    Our destination is what I'll call the Roaring River plateau, an area of mostly 4000-5000' elevation. It includes a number of small subalpine meadows and lakes, connected by a network of bike-legal trails. It's a pretty lightly used area considering that it's only a 75 mile drive from Portland, and to be honest I'd never noticed it on the map even though I spend a lot of time looking at maps.

    Our starting point Hideaway Lake campground, an aptly named campground that's nearly empty on this Saturday morning. The campground is at 4000', so we avoid a nasty 3000' climb that I've heard of other bikers making in order to access this area. Despite an ugly weather forecast that calls for cold weather and heavy rain, our ride starts out sunny. My riding partner, Eric, and I head down road 4830 and are treated to a decent view encompassing "Mr. Jefferson" and even the Three Sisters:



    We hop off the gravel onto Rimrock trail #704, a somewhat overgrown and fairly technical track that climbs 700 feet over Mt. Mitchell in its first half mile or so. Needless to say, we walk most of this, speculating on how much fun it would be as a downhill and wondering if we should have done our loop the other direction. It would be great to be here in huckleberry season, although the climb would take 3 times as long. Anyway, we soon top out and hit a 2-mile downhill at a near-perfect perfect grade though lovely forest. The lightly-used tread shown here is typical:



    After another short stretch of gravel road, we enter a large area of interconnected meadows. Here's one:



    A couple minutes later Richie discovered this little forest inhabitant, about 1" long. Fortunately he did not eat it:



    The next mile or so follows a very rocky streambed to Cache Meadow. It was barely rideable, but would be easier in the other direction due to the slight uphill grade. The sign marking Cache Meadow has been there a long time:



    We head over Frazier Mountain The weather has gone from sunny to cloudy to foggy. We've overdressed, expecting rain, so we don't mind. Well, except it would be nice to take in the view from here to Shellrock Lake 600' below. We'll see this talus slope from the bottom later:



    We cruise through Frazier Turnaround and Frazier Fork campgrounds, not full but with some definite hunter activity going on. We head down trail #510 to do an out-and-back towards Shining Lake. The name of the lake, the weather and the fact that it's October make us start thinking about Jack Nicholson, but he doesn't make an appearance. It turns out to be an old logging road and not a trail, but it's a nice cruise. On some other day, it would have a nice view over the Roaring River 2000' below:



    We decide not to make the final steep descent to Shining Lake, since we don't feel like climbing back up it and we're already looking at a pretty long day. It's a lovely trail though, lined with rhododendrons. Would be nice to be here in June:



    Backtracking to the Frazier campgrounds, we resume our loop with a very technical (barely rideable, even downhill) descent on Shellrock Lake trail #700. It's tough but fun. Here's one of the easier sections:



    That talus slope we traversed earlier drops right into Shellrock Lake. Richie's been slowing down the last few miles, but he's instant high-energy dog again - just add water! - when we get to the lake. Too lovely not to indulge in some fetch time:



    One interesting aspect of this ride is that it featured more mushrooms than I've ever seen anywhere. Every conceivable variety - including chanterelles - was represented, and they were everywhere. Here's one of the weirder ones, growing on this dead snag:



    From here, we had a 1.5 mile downhill that was simply too perfect and flowy to stop and interrupt for photo-ops. Sorry, you'll have to go and ride it yourself to see it.

    Eric and I both had high expectations for this area after close inspection of the maps, and those expectations were exceeded. I wouldn't miss the trails I explored 2 weeks ago if they were incorporated into Wilderness. I would miss these. I sure hope I get another chance to ride them, and maybe explore trails 512 and 517 out towards Serene Lake and Grouse Point. Not only were these great trails (mostly intermediate, with some advanced sections that some intermediate riders would have to walk), but they were quiet. We only encountered 5 people (3 hunters and 2 hikers) in 23 miles of riding. Definitely get out and ride these if you get the chance.

    - Dan
    Hey Dan, thanks so much for the pics and trail info. I am a native Orgian and bike anywhere from Hood to SW WA and I never heard of this place. Oh, once about 10 years ago I biked for my second time from top of Frazier rock around Frazier turnaround. Their was tremendous blowdown and skeeters in the area, bitten up cause we had to get off our bikes so much. Is this the same area off the upper Clackamas before Timothy Lake? Thanks again and where do you get the maps. I would be happy to join you guys for a ride, I live in NE Portland.

    -Jon.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Hey Dan, thanks so much for the pics and trail info. I am a native Orgian and bike anywhere from Hood to SW WA and I never heard of this place. Oh, once about 10 years ago I biked for my second time from top of Frazier rock around Frazier turnaround. Their was tremendous blowdown and skeeters in the area, bitten up cause we had to get off our bikes so much. Is this the same area off the upper Clackamas before Timothy Lake? Thanks again and where do you get the maps. I would be happy to join you guys for a ride, I live in NE Portland.

    -Jon.
    Jon -

    I just used the Green Trails hiking maps. They're not perfectly accurate, but they are right most of the time - and they have contour lines at 80' intervals, which is plenty adequate for biking. Yes, this is the same area off the upper Clackamas a few miles west of Timothy Lake. I think you were pretty close to where Eric and I rode, although since it's October we did not encounter any mosquitoes. If you want to join me for a ride the most immediate opportunity will be Barbie Camp (see the sticky thread also on this board). Otherwise send me a PM or check in with the PUMPclub board at groups.yahoo.com, which I also visit frequently.

    - Dan

    - Dan

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlowBoy
    One interesting aspect of this ride is that it featured more mushrooms than I've ever seen anywhere. Every conceivable variety - including chanterelles - was represented, and they were everywhere. Here's one of the weirder ones, growing on this dead snag:



    - Dan
    I'm pretty sure that's a cauliflower mushroom (Sparrasis crispa). According to the best mushroom book I've seen, "Mushrooms Demystified" by David Aurora, these are exceptionally good eating.

    A friend who knows mushrooms gave us one a couple years ago, and I would have to agree- we whittled it up and stir fried it with garlic and herbs for a pasta sauce...it looked exactly like the one in your picture, and was about 6" thick.

    It's really important to know the ID of any mushroom for certain before eating it, of course.

    Aurora states that these grow singly at the base of mature conifers or stumps, can get pretty big, as much as 20 pounds, but are usually about 6-8" thick.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by riverrat
    Aurora states that these grow singly at the base of mature conifers or stumps, can get pretty big, as much as 20 pounds, but are usually about 6-8" thick.
    Interesting. This one was about 6' off the ground. There was another one on the same snag, 10-12' up.

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