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Thread: removing cogs

  1. #1
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    removing cogs

    I am new to SS and have partially converted a bike but left the extra cogs in the cassette until I gave it a try. I am now ready to get rid of the extra cogs, if I can.
    The question is:
    Do I need a special tool to take the cassette apart?

  2. #2
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    probably

    Quote Originally Posted by Dsmith
    I am new to SS and have partially converted a bike but left the extra cogs in the cassette until I gave it a try. I am now ready to get rid of the extra cogs, if I can.
    The question is:
    Do I need a special tool to take the cassette apart?
    You will most likely need a cassette lockring tool and a chain whip, or freewheel tool depending if the ratcheting mechanism is part of the hub or part of the cassette. Look at the drive side of the rear hub and see if you have the lockring there, it should be an internally splined ring that often has an arrow and a torque spec printed on it. The cassette may remove as a complete unit requiring more work to seperate the cogs or it may come apart into single cogs and or paired or grouped cogs. It should not be a big deal but you may want to borrow the tool or have your LBS do it if you don't expect to do this often.

    You may be better off removing the entire cassette and putting an SS specific cog on once you have the size dialed.
    Last edited by Mattman; 06-18-2005 at 05:47 PM. Reason: add other info
    Two Wheeled and Too Big

  3. #3
    17.5" pistons of love
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    get a cog...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dsmith
    I am new to SS and have partially converted a bike but left the extra cogs in the cassette until I gave it a try. I am now ready to get rid of the extra cogs, if I can.
    The question is:
    Do I need a special tool to take the cassette apart?
    Leave your cassette in tact as most don't come apart, and get a cog designed to be a single. They typically have a wider base or footprint on the freehub body which will keep you from digging ruts into your freehub body, also no shift ramps. Just figure out what gear you want. Surly makes an cool, inexpensive cog in many sizes, but not always available. Then you'll need some spacers to allow it to tighten up in place of your cassette and to allow adjustment of your chainline. I think Spot makes a spacer kit and others, but I just keep various spacers around-2.5mm,3.5mm and so on.

    I just ordered a Surly cog from a shop, QBP (supplier) had some in stock so your shop should be able to get something. Wheels manufacturing has spacer kits, also in stock.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dsmith
    I am new to SS and have partially converted a bike but left the extra cogs in the cassette until I gave it a try. I am now ready to get rid of the extra cogs, if I can.
    The question is:
    Do I need a special tool to take the cassette apart?
    It depends. I've seen cassettes held together with long bolts, just unbolt and it falls apart. Others are riveted, grind the rivet heads off. Even if you are going to buy an SS cog old cassettes are good for spacers.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    It depends. I've seen cassettes held together with long bolts, just unbolt and it falls apart. Others are riveted, grind the rivet heads off. Even if you are going to buy an SS cog old cassettes are good for spacers.
    you can file the rivet heads off easily. To get the 3 pins out you can use a nail or a drift punch, a punch with a long slender shaft

    Make a wide base steel SS cog

    Using 3 steel cogs
    A SS'r I know has taken three Shimano DX cogs (can also use Nova and cassette cogs) and welded them together to greatly widen the base, of course the two on the outside are the small ones, 14t or so, and the middle one is the drive cog. Remember to align the tabs properly and maintain alighnment while welding (HOW?)

    Using cassette cogs
    1) need a drive cog and two others, 4 spacers and three split pins about long that are just a bit larger in diameter than the three pin holes in the cogs and spacers. (The pins are made of steel and look like hollow cylindars split down the side.)
    2) Options with the two other cogs A)cut the teeth off the two others to create two steel spacers. B)use two small cogs as is. C) use two cogs much larger than the drive cog, as guides to prevent chain drop from the drive cog. Remove the teeth or not.
    3) Make a stack of cogs and spacers. Remember to line up the wider tab on all the cogs. Depending on the choice of options in step 2 you can i) put the three cogs together with 2 spacers on either side or ii) alternate spacers and cogs with the drive cog in the centre
    4) Using finishing nails that just easily fit into the holes, tack the stack down lightly to a board using 2 nails. This will register the pin holes. Tap one pin into the remaining hole. Pull one nail and tap a pin into that hole. Pull the other nail and tap the third pin in.
    5) Install on hub using spacers to get a straight chain line.
    6) Changing the drive cog is easy the pins can be drifted out using a finishing nail or a drift punch and light taps. Support the stack on two boards, leaving space between the boards for the pins to stick out. Tap out the pins part way till the drive cog is free. Reassemble the stack and push or tap the pins back into place.

  6. #6
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    Thank you all for the tips. I will have a great father's day working on my bike

  7. #7
    17.5" pistons of love
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    Quote Originally Posted by hu-man
    you can file the rivet heads off easily. To get the 3 pins out you can use a nail or a drift punch, a punch with a long slender shaft

    Make a wide base steel SS cog

    Using 3 steel cogs
    A SS'r I know has taken three Shimano DX cogs (can also use Nova and cassette cogs) and welded them together to greatly widen the base, of course the two on the outside are the small ones, 14t or so, and the middle one is the drive cog. Remember to align the tabs properly and maintain alighnment while welding (HOW?)

    Using cassette cogs
    1) need a drive cog and two others, 4 spacers and three split pins about long that are just a bit larger in diameter than the three pin holes in the cogs and spacers. (The pins are made of steel and look like hollow cylindars split down the side.)
    2) Options with the two other cogs A)cut the teeth off the two others to create two steel spacers. B)use two small cogs as is. C) use two cogs much larger than the drive cog, as guides to prevent chain drop from the drive cog. Remove the teeth or not.
    3) Make a stack of cogs and spacers. Remember to line up the wider tab on all the cogs. Depending on the choice of options in step 2 you can i) put the three cogs together with 2 spacers on either side or ii) alternate spacers and cogs with the drive cog in the centre
    4) Using finishing nails that just easily fit into the holes, tack the stack down lightly to a board using 2 nails. This will register the pin holes. Tap one pin into the remaining hole. Pull one nail and tap a pin into that hole. Pull the other nail and tap the third pin in.
    5) Install on hub using spacers to get a straight chain line.
    6) Changing the drive cog is easy the pins can be drifted out using a finishing nail or a drift punch and light taps. Support the stack on two boards, leaving space between the boards for the pins to stick out. Tap out the pins part way till the drive cog is free. Reassemble the stack and push or tap the pins back into place.
    Sounds like a cool idea, but alot of work!
    The Domesticated SSer

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