Recommend a steel SS 29'er under $1K- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 25 of 25
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    15

    Recommend a steel SS 29'er under $1K

    I don't ride anything but smooth trails, commuting, and boring stuff due to back problems, but hey, at least I'm riding.

    I've got a geared 29er, and have had the SS itch for years. Should I just go with a Fisher or Trek ready made bike, or are there other nice complete bikes on a budget like Surly, etc?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    710
    Kona Unit

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    26
    I ride a Raliegh XXIX that I bought new in 2007, commuted on it for a year, and have ridden over one thousand miles of singletrack a year for the last two years. I've upgraded the componentry as it wears out. I love this bike and it's all I ride on dirt any more. The best upgrade I've made is replacing the stock BB5 brakes with BB7's, they are a much better brake and may have influenced my original buy if I'd had experience with them before hand, other than that, I'd highly recommend the bike.

  4. #4
    Currently in Exile
    Reputation: Frozenspokes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,303
    Try looking at the GT Peace 9r also. I just picked mine up yesterday.



    Geometry feels good. The bike handled pretty well on some very tight and twisty singletrack on it's maiden ride.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  5. #5
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
    Reputation: nuck_chorris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,809
    KHS Solo One SE
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    15
    I'm looking for more of a slick tire commuter / city bike than a single track mtb.

    Trek Soho / District, Specialized Langster, Globe Roll come to mind.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thatdrewguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    461
    Quote Originally Posted by steel fan
    I'm looking for more of a slick tire commuter / city bike than a single track mtb.

    Trek Soho / District, Specialized Langster, Globe Roll come to mind.
    maybe i'm nickpicking but don't all the bikes listed above come with 700c wheels rather than 29", seems you are looking for a SS road / city bike.

  8. #8
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    Take a look at SS Cross bikes. Bianchi San Jose or Specialized Tricross SS come to mind. Kona and Masi also have similar complete offerings I think. I ride a San Jose and it's got a solid stock build. I have abused the crap out of mine and it has held up well. Still use most of the stock components besides tires/saddle and cockpit.
    Last edited by CycleAddict; 04-11-2010 at 06:48 PM.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    15

    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by CycleAddict
    Take a look at SS Cross bikes. Bianchi San Jose or Specialized Tricross SS come to mind. Kona and Masi also have similar complete offerings I think. I ride a San Jose and it's got a solid stock build. I have abused the crap out of mine and it has held up well. Still use most of the stock components besides tires/saddle and cockpit.
    Thanks - I took a quick look and really like that Bianchi... My beef with the Treks & Specialized is the aluminum frame. The Globe gets points for a nice Reynolds 531 (I think) frame, and the Bianchi is steel which is nice.

    I'm just looking for a commuter / errand type bike that'll be good for workouts on smooth surfaces. Already have a geared 29'er and a roadbike.

  10. #10
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    Quote Originally Posted by steel fan
    Thanks - I took a quick look and really like that Bianchi... My beef with the Treks & Specialized is the aluminum frame. The Globe gets points for a nice Reynolds 531 (I think) frame, and the Bianchi is steel which is nice.

    I'm just looking for a commuter / errand type bike that'll be good for workouts on smooth surfaces. Already have a geared 29'er and a roadbike.
    I think it depends on how you want the bike to handle and where you will be riding it most. Do you want to ride aggressive or just sit up straight and cruise around? Cross bikes will feel more aggressive then something like a globe or soho. Maybe check out the commuter board for SS commuter rigs. Roadbikereview.com also has good info on these type of bikes.

  11. #11
    Nervous Descender
    Reputation: Adirondack Blues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    717
    Jabberwocky.
    Check out some of our local hills: CDRC (Capital District Road Climbs)

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    15
    Holy crap the Masi models with the flat bar and flip flop hub are beautiful. I can't imagine these frames are still Italian-made at these prices though. So has Masi gone from respected Italian marque to kindof a Motobecane type deal?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    681
    On One Inbred. I've been riding the 26" version for years and it rocks. Steel, compliant, yet excellent at climbing. The 29" version is said to be at least as good in every way.

  14. #14
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    I'd also recommend a cross bike. I have a Surly Steamroller, which is a track-ish bike, and shod with 37's up front and 26's in the back, I love it. Very compliant. I built it up a couple of years ago for ~$700.


  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    15
    Nice pic p nut!

    I guess I'm looking for more of a pavement / hard pack bike so cross type bikes make sense. Salsa has a nice one, and I like the Bianchi San Jose as well.

  16. #16
    Leg Shaver
    Reputation: Ike Turner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    546
    If you want to work at it I am sure you can piece together a bike for under $1000 with far better components than some of these complete bikes.

    Start with frame fork and wheelset.

    Nothing against these new bikes. But the trade off you make is more often than not is the wheelset. Of all the bikes listed you will likely want to upgrade the wheelset which will put you over your budget anyway

    That said, the Kona seems well put together

    The Surly KM comes in just over your budget however the wheelset is quite nice.
    Why are there so many threads about cheap ass bikes?

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    61
    redline monocog 100%

  18. #18
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by steel fan
    Nice pic p nut!

    I guess I'm looking for more of a pavement / hard pack bike so cross type bikes make sense. Salsa has a nice one, and I like the Bianchi San Jose as well.
    Thanks. After reading your other post (that I missed earlier) saying that you're looking for just a city commuter bike, I'd even say just a SS road bike would be better suited for you, rather than a cross bike. At less than $1k, there are plenty of options. Bianchi Pista, Raleigh Rush Hour, and my favorite, of course, Surly Steamroller. These should all be in the $600 range, complete. The rest of the funds can be used for tires and wheelsets. The advantage of the Steamroller is being able to fit 38's, but that might not be important to you.

    One bike I thought was really cool around the $1k mark is the Jamis Sputnik.


  19. #19
    openwound
    Reputation: voodoochild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    580
    Like someone already said, how about a jabberwocky.

  20. #20
    offroader
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,190
    Redline Monocog Flight

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    28
    Redline monocog all the way! 500 and badass!
    Jimmy for president!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    15
    A road bike works for what I need, and I like the Jamis P nut posted. There might be some dirt road or hardpack miles though.

    Also looking at the Masi single speeds and Bianchi San Jose. The Bianchi will take some nice fat tires. Also the Globe Roll - more of a plain ol' city bike and less of a road bike or mtb.

    The belt-drive Trek District is pretty cool as well. I'm just not sure I want aluminum, though for shorter city hops its probably a non-issue.

  23. #23
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by steel fan
    Holy crap the Masi models with the flat bar and flip flop hub are beautiful. I can't imagine these frames are still Italian-made at these prices though. So has Masi gone from respected Italian marque to kindof a Motobecane type deal?
    They're owned by Haro now, as much as they try to deny it. Taiwan built.
    I had a 2005 Masi Gran Corsa, and it was a pretty damn nice bike for the money, Haro or not.
    I wouldnt kick it out of bed for eating cookies. Although, i only rode it 5 times before i realized i HATE riding road.

  24. #24
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by steel fan
    A road bike works for what I need, and I like the Jamis P nut posted. There might be some dirt road or hardpack miles though.
    For dirt road and hardpack rides, this is a non-issue for any road bike. Any of the bikes I listed will handle it just fine. I frequently take my Steamroller on either 38's or 26's through a single track with lots of gravel, rocks, and roots. Don't assume because it's a "road bike" that it can't handle a little bit of the rough stuff. I think you'll like the quick geometry for city riding, too. I like zipping around on mine, vs riding on my MTB on-road.




  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    100
    monocog flight

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.