Rear gearing from 9 speed cassette?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Rear gearing from 9 speed cassette?

    I canibalized a 9 speed deore cassette for my 15t around-town gear. Right now I'm running 32x15 with 26in wheels. I was thinking about tearing apart the rest of it for a nice 17t option on real "mountain" trails. Has anyone ever done this type of thing before. It seemed to work but I'm concerned with it eating my freehub body. Are most of the wide cogs for use with only a ss chain or can I keep my 9 speed stuff???

  2. #2
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    I'd pony up the $5 or so for a cheap "real" single speed cog for mountain use like a Gusset or Shimano DX. The first time your chain doesn't derail it'll be worth it. A Deore cassette doesn't use a carrier for all the cogs, so single cogs aren't any worse for your freehub than that Deore cassette would be. What rear hub do you have? Aluminum freehubs are prone to gouging unless you get a wider base cog like Surly, which cost more. Steel freehub bodies are basically immune to cog damage. Essentially all cassette single speed cogs are compatible with 8/9 speed chains

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by half_squid
    I'd pony up the $5 or so for a cheap "real" single speed cog for mountain use like a Gusset or Shimano DX. The first time your chain doesn't derail it'll be worth it. A Deore cassette doesn't use a carrier for all the cogs, so single cogs aren't any worse for your freehub than that Deore cassette would be. What rear hub do you have? Aluminum freehubs are prone to gouging unless you get a wider base cog like Surly, which cost more. Steel freehub bodies are basically immune to cog damage. Essentially all cassette single speed cogs are compatible with 8/9 speed chains
    Steel freehub bodies are definitely not immune to damage from skinny cogs, they are more durable than aluminum, but can still very much get marred. Cassettes that don't ride on carriers are pinned together, which distributes the load across more than one cog at a time effectively widening the base. Also not all cassette based cogs are 8/9 speed compatible. There are two options: 1/8 inch (track chains, single speed) and 3/32 (8/9 speed). Many of the cheap BMX cogs are 1/8 inch. Gusset and DX cogs on an aluminum freehub for offroad riding is asking for damage. Even on steel freehubs you can cause damage with these if you ride at all hard. It's entirely worth the small investment to get a decent wide-based cog if you want your gear to last.

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