Quiet hubs? I want it all...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Quiet hubs? I want it all...

    Okay...I know I am going to get some flak on this but here it goes...
    I want a quiet hub also read(NOT EXPENSIVE)..SS hub. I don't care if it is a cassette hub or SS specific... I just want quiet and inexpensive. I don't want to pay more than 200.00 for the pair of hubs. Just trying to build an inexpensive ride that I can enjoy and not break the budget.
    Thanks Chris

  2. #2
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    The quietest hubs are the fixed ones, also cheap.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  3. #3
    Five is right out
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    Shimano XT. Good quality, quiet. Well less than $200.

  4. #4
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    I will look into the Shimano XT's. Thanks

    I also forgot to mention (This also in the "I want it all portion") I don't really want skewers.
    I would rather have the regular way of just a tightening nut as I am useing a Surly 1X1 frame, I don't trust skewers in slideing dropouts.

    Can you convert a skewered hub to the other way?
    Chris

  5. #5
    Yo.
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    Most hubs that use cup-and-cone bearings (Shimano hubs included) can be converted with a solid axle and nuts for relatively little cost. Hubs that have sealed bearings may have a proprietary axle that may not be easily had in a solid, threaded version.

    As far as quiet, non-fixed hubs go, you could try and find an older Shimano roller-clutch freehub; IIRC, LX and maybe STX-RC hubs from the mid-90s had this feature as an option.

    A more modern version is the True Precision Stealth hub, but it's a little more than you have budgeted.
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
    I am a poser. But forums.poser.com doesn't seem to exist, so I come here instead.

  6. #6
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    Surly hub + ACS freewheel = quiet and cheap

  7. #7
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    The Joytech single speed specific rear hub which came stock on my Raleigh XXIX is ridiculously quiet were talking silent. I know its not the best quality but Ive had no troubles and it is running strong. I also have a bike with a Shimano XT hub its much louder.

  8. #8
    A Gentleman and a MTBR'
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    I have a shimano silent clutch hub, that should be pretty quiet.

  9. #9
    Birthday Collector
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    I'll second the "cheapo" Joytech hubs - mine are 3+ years old, not one problem and tons of hilly miles and some rough terrain and conditions. One of the things I like so much about my bike is the near-silence while riding it.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  10. #10
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    What's funny is I want the opposite, The trail I ride the most has tons of blind corners and is really popular with walkers, A loud freewheel would be awesome give them a warning when Im coming down the trail. Wanna Trade?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dgtlbliss
    Surly hub + ACS freewheel = quiet and cheap
    I second this.
    True North custom chromoly SS Rigid 29er. FUN+

  12. #12
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    I have an old lx silent clutch on my bike (just converted it from geared to singlespeed).

    Its dead quiet freewheels really easily and has quite a lot of engagement points (for a shimano hub).

    It is really heavy though and has no provision for disc brakes (not sure if they ever made a disc brake version), and the engagement is a little spongey, it not too bad but you can tell the difference between it and a pawl type.

    The axle is easy peasy to change out for a solid 10mm axle as well.

    If you hunt around you'll find some bike shops which still have then new, and cheap.

    Most shimano hubs are pretty quiet anyway (if not a bit of oil in the freewheel helps) you'll notice the tyre noise more than the freewheel noise.

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