Question for Sliding Dropout Inbred Owners- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mbabaracus
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    Question for Sliding Dropout Inbred Owners

    I'm thinking of building a sliding dropout On One inbred into a rigid daily commuter. I haven't aquired the bike yet. However in my scheme, I would want to build it up with disc brakes, fenders and racks. My concern is that the disc brakes may interfere with the mounting of the rack and/or (planet bike fred) fenders. Does anyone have an Inbred set up like I am speaking. If not can someone post a cose-up picture of the rear triangle with near the disc mounts and dropouts. Any photos, help, or insignt is appreciated.

    bm

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    You will need to use band clamps on the stays to fit racks and/or fenders. There are on mounts on the frame.
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  3. #3
    mbabaracus
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    Thanks for the picture and the insight. I was hoping the inbred which is kind of the jack-of-all-frames would be a good option. I'll explore further. This place needs a forum for commuters. Thanks again.

    bm

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbabaracus
    Thanks for the picture and the insight. I was hoping the inbred which is kind of the jack-of-all-frames would be a good option. I'll explore further. This place needs a forum for commuters. Thanks again.

    bm
    This guy is the master of custom commuter setups. http://sheldonbrown.com/home.html
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  5. #5
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    The Inbred still is a good option. As Shiggy said, band clamps work fine. You can purchase racks specifically designed to be used with disc brakes that come with the clamps to make it work.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbabaracus
    I'm thinking of building a sliding dropout On One inbred into a rigid daily commuter. I haven't aquired the bike yet. However in my scheme, I would want to build it up with disc brakes, fenders and racks. My concern is that the disc brakes may interfere with the mounting of the rack and/or (planet bike fred) fenders. Does anyone have an Inbred set up like I am speaking. If not can someone post a cose-up picture of the rear triangle with near the disc mounts and dropouts. Any photos, help, or insignt is appreciated.

    bm




    Forget the adapter clamps. Just buy a rack and put the mounting screws through one of the holes not used. I already see two of them in the picture above.

  7. #7
    Welsh Dave
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    Tubus from Germany do a range of widgets that allow their racks to fit bikes without rack mounts or with suspension, discs etc.

    http://www.thetouringstore.com/TUBUS...ONS%20PAGE.htm

    http://www.tubus.net/eng/produkte/zubehoer.php

    If you're in N. America, the distributor is: http://www.ortliebusa.com/

    DM

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by barber
    Forget the adapter clamps. Just buy a rack and put the mounting screws through one of the holes not used. I already see two of them in the picture above.
    Exactly what holes on the driveside is he supposed to use?

  9. #9
    mbabaracus
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    Quote Originally Posted by Welsh Dave
    Tubus from Germany do a range of widgets that allow their racks to fit bikes without rack mounts or with suspension, discs etc.

    http://www.thetouringstore.com/TUBUS...ONS%20PAGE.htm

    http://www.tubus.net/eng/produkte/zubehoer.php

    If you're in N. America, the distributor is: http://www.ortliebusa.com/

    DM

    Thanks for the links. They look like they have some pretty robust options. I had some reservations about band clamps being weaker than built-in options, but those look good. I was hoping to get the inbred to work out because the alternative for me would be considerably more expensive. I was contemplating a custom steel frame as well.

    bm

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwiffle
    Exactly what holes on the driveside is he supposed to use?

    What are you talking about? There are two holes right there!

  11. #11
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by barber
    What are you talking about? There are two holes right there!
    You can see the driveside dropout?



    I would use bands to get the rack and fender struts away from the brake caliper
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  12. #12
    Welsh Dave
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    Disc Clearance

    I think Shiggy's suggestion is probably best. For an example, see the lower rack mounts on the Kona Sutra, which are on the seat-stays, just above the dropouts. So the rack attaches well forward/ above the sliding disc mount.

    Alternatively, the various Tubus brackets give you a couple of other options... but might require the sliding dropouts to be set in particular positions to clear the rack - which has obvious implications for chain tension:




  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    You can see the driveside dropout?



    I would use bands to get the rack and fender struts away from the brake caliper

    No. This is clearly a non-driveside view. And you can see two very large holes right there. The guy wanting to put a rear rack on can mount the rack through one of those holes using a nut.

  14. #14
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    A little ingenuity and some clamps can go a long way. That basket (built onto a front rack) is mounted on a disc only fork, including no canti studs. It can be done. You just have to get the right hardware together and start with the right rack.


    And the rack is still going strong carrying groceries and beer when needed. I don't think I'd ever want to carry that load to regularly though, but 30-40 lbs is no problem.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowridemo
    A little ingenuity and some clamps can go a long way. That basket (built onto a front rack) is mounted on a disc only fork, including no canti studs. It can be done. You just have to get the right hardware together and start with the right rack.


    And the rack is still going strong carrying groceries and beer when needed. I don't think I'd ever want to carry that load to regularly though, but 30-40 lbs is no problem.


    Pretty ingenious! Where do you get clamps that big to fit around a suspension fork? And how do you fit it on there? Got a close-up pic?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by barber
    Pretty ingenious! Where do you get clamps that big to fit around a suspension fork? And how do you fit it on there? Got a close-up pic?
    Band clamps can be made from stainless rack top struts but the above is not a suspension fork.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    the above is not a suspension fork.
    That is correct. Just a very beefy rigid steel fork. And I don't have any pictures as I don't have that fork any more. You can get clamps from lots of rack manufacturers jandd, tubus, etc. I didn't like the rigidity of those for this apllication though with all of the weight so I used something else. The fork legs were round and 31.8 in diameter so I used two modified handlebar reflector brackets. They were cheap (ie free), didn't flex in any tests I did, and were nice to the paint. Other refelctor brackets not so much. They were going strong for about 5 months before I ended up swapping out forks. I had planned to replace them annually just to be safe against the plastic aging or something. I came up with the reflector idea after looking into probably a dozen other possibilities before ruling them out for flexiness or price (various derailleur adaptors or add-on e-type derailleur mounts didn't jive with my cheapness).

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by barber
    No. This is clearly a non-driveside view. And you can see two very large holes right there. The guy wanting to put a rear rack on can mount the rack through one of those holes using a nut.
    Ahh, I see what holes you are referring to now. I thought you were referring to the disc brake mount holes. Of course, I still do not see how you could mount a normal rack to those holes with the brake caliper in the way.

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