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  1. #1
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    The Perfect Bike

    Like most people on here, I am constantly tweaking and changing stuff on my bike. New fork, new brakes, upgrade upgrade upgrade.

    Has anyone found the perfect bike (for them/their style obviously)? A bike you're completely satisfied with and just don't need to upgrade? Does such a bike even exist?

    If you have a ride like that, can you post a pic and say why it cured you of your chronic upgradeitis?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ampan
    Like most people on here, I am constantly tweaking and changing stuff on my bike. New fork, new brakes, upgrade upgrade upgrade.

    Has anyone found the perfect bike (for them/their style obviously)? A bike you're completely satisfied with and just don't need to upgrade? Does such a bike even exist?

    If you have a ride like that, can you post a pic and say why it cured you of your chronic upgradeitis?
    This is my IndyFab 29er SS. It has cured me of upgraditis because

    1. It has never broke even under my 280lb azz

    2. It has perfect gearing for me in Alabama 34/20

    3. I had it built with no cost limitations just the way I wanted it

    4. It has the perfect geometry for me

    5. Every part on it was carefully thought out before final selection and there isn't another one like it anywhere close by


  3. #3
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    I'm always upgrading... but once I get a White Industries freewheel... a set of nice cranks (Middleburn or Mr. Whirly)... a WTB Devo saddle... eggbeater SLs to replace my Cs... and maybe a carbon fork, then it will be "done." Or time for a new, lighter frame made out of 953...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDDIE JONES
    You need to upgrade your camera ... that one takes photos of the wrong side of the bike for some reason.

    PS. Your I.F. looks like a keeper.

  5. #5
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    I'm pretty much done with the upgraditis thing. The last thing I changed was the cages, and although they're pink they still work well enough that they're gonna stay. I've considered upgrading the Hayes Mag G2's, but they work and I know how to work on them. The seatpost has been swapped to a layback Thomson, but everything else is pretty much set in stone.
    Kinda weird to have a bike and not look across the room at it and think "Maybe if I had a better___________".



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  6. #6
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    I had the perfect bike for me. There was nothing I wanted to change. It fit my riding style perfectly. Then my riding style started to change, and now I am at a point where I don't know what I want.

    As far as components go, I know what I like, and will get what I want right from the start. It's the frame/geometry that will take me some time to figure out.
    Disclaimer: I fix bikes for a living.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ampan
    Like most people on here, I am constantly tweaking and changing stuff on my bike. New fork, new brakes, upgrade upgrade upgrade.

    Has anyone found the perfect bike (for them/their style obviously)? A bike you're completely satisfied with and just don't need to upgrade? Does such a bike even exist?

    If you have a ride like that, can you post a pic and say why it cured you of your chronic upgradeitis?
    You should stop to wonder why you think the notion of an upgrade is going to make your bike more perfect.

    Why would you think that a swap of parts is an "upgrade," and why would you think it stands a chance of making a bike more or less perfect?

    By making the bike fit you better you are not "upgrading" it. You are making it fit you. There's no "upgrade" in that area. None.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by swillbilly sledneck
    You should stop to wonder why you think the notion of an upgrade is going to make your bike more perfect.

    Why would you think that a swap of parts is an "upgrade," and why would you think it stands a chance of making a bike more or less perfect?

    By making the bike fit you better you are not "upgrading" it. You are making it fit you. There's no "upgrade" in that area. None.


    thats deeeeeeeep.

    but true.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by swillbilly sledneck
    You should stop to wonder why you think the notion of an upgrade is going to make your bike more perfect.

    Why would you think that a swap of parts is an "upgrade," and why would you think it stands a chance of making a bike more or less perfect?

    By making the bike fit you better you are not "upgrading" it. You are making it fit you. There's no "upgrade" in that area. None.

    Yeah, I guess I think of getting a 90mm stem instead of a 110 because you're too stretched as making your ride fit you better, whereas upgrading your post from the EA30 to the Thomson is an upgrade, because the function is the same, one is just way nicer.

    But without sliding into semantics hell, I'm more just curious whether people who eventually get everything all dialed and fitted and spend the money to buy the exact stuff they want are satisfied.

    Sometimes I feel like "hey, LX stuff is really nice. Why should I spring for XT? It's not like I'm blowing through LX cranks left and right because they can't handle my power... (but that would be sweet). I wonder if my feeling of always wanting better crap is because I'm a mindless consumer or if it's a journey to reach some eventual "perfect bike" where I don't feel like changing anything. Because if my bike will never quite be good enough (could always use some Ti stem bolts right???) then I'll just stop caring and ride it how it is and buy new stuff when old stuff breaks.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ampan

    But without sliding into semantics hell, I'm more just curious whether people who eventually get everything all dialed and fitted and spend the money to buy the exact stuff they want are satisfied.
    I caught your drift.

    That's why my Boone cogs are gone, and replaced by Chris Kings (slightly cheaper/less pretty).
    My skewers are just cheap $11.00 bolt -on steel jobbers.
    Also sold my King headset and replaced it with a Race Face I had laying around.
    PC-1's instead of nicer/lighter/more expensive chains.
    Hayes Mags instead of something that came out in the last five years.
    Thomson stem/post. I've got a lighter Syntace stem, and a fancier carbon Race Face post, but the Thomson stuff is what I'm running.

    Sure there is what some may call "bling" on my bike, but everything was picked for it's dependability. That's what mattered most to me.

    Dialed.
    Fitted.
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  11. #11
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    I wish there was an easier way to try out new and different geometries. I don't think you can really change the way your current bikes works with upgrades (mostly). I have a hard time thinking about going custom over production though, just because I don't know what I should be having built.

    These are some of the questions that are much harder for me to contemplate:

    Should I get short chainstays, or are these longer ones just fine? Should I get a custom rake rigid fork, or will it not really make that much difference with 5mm extra offset? Do I really need to save 1.5 lbs in the frame by getting Ti instead of steel? etc etc etc

    I'm pretty sure that until I can anser those questions, I will never get close to knowing if I have the perfect bike (which I might already).

  12. #12
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    Idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    I wish there was an easier way to try out new and different geometries. I don't think you can really change the way your current bikes works with upgrades (mostly). I have a hard time thinking about going custom over production though, just because I don't know what I should be having built.

    These are some of the questions that are much harder for me to contemplate:

    Should I get short chainstays, or are these longer ones just fine? Should I get a custom rake rigid fork, or will it not really make that much difference with 5mm extra offset? Do I really need to save 1.5 lbs in the frame by getting Ti instead of steel? etc etc etc

    I'm pretty sure that until I can anser those questions, I will never get close to knowing if I have the perfect bike (which I might already).

    keep an eye on the classifieds and buy used parts at a discounted price. once you have accumulated a knowledge of what works for you take a little bit from every different setup you have ridden and make a customer one.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    I wish there was an easier way to try out new and different geometries. I don't think you can really change the way your current bikes works with upgrades (mostly). I have a hard time thinking about going custom over production though, just because I don't know what I should be having built.

    These are some of the questions that are much harder for me to contemplate:

    Should I get short chainstays, or are these longer ones just fine? Should I get a custom rake rigid fork, or will it not really make that much difference with 5mm extra offset? Do I really need to save 1.5 lbs in the frame by getting Ti instead of steel? etc etc etc

    I'm pretty sure that until I can anser those questions, I will never get close to knowing if I have the perfect bike (which I might already).
    a good builder will have many of those answers for you, simply by determining your riding style, size, and how you desire the bike to ride.

    most of the truly obsessive riders will never stop tinkering with their stuff...because there is no perfect bike. i like to ride a lot of different bikes and styles, i'll bet many mtb'rs are the same.
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    a good builder will have many of those answers for you, simply by determining your riding style, size, and how you desire the bike to ride.

    most of the truly obsessive riders will never stop tinkering with their stuff...because there is no perfect bike. i like to ride a lot of different bikes and styles, i'll bet many mtb'rs are the same.
    I ride a Vassago Jaberwocky with matching rigid fork. It's a production bike with production geo. I really don't have any complaints, and I actually like it pretty well. I do think I would prefer something that steered a little faster. I don't know (being about 80% happy) if it's worth spending the money to get a custom frame. I have been thinking about getting just a custom fork, but without a slightly steeper HTA there's only so far I can go with the fork.

    I like to ride bikes too. I don't really need more than one. That's why I'd like to have the right one.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by massSCENE
    keep an eye on the classifieds and buy used parts at a discounted price. once you have accumulated a knowledge of what works for you take a little bit from every different setup you have ridden and make a customer one.
    I'm pretty happy with my parts. It's not likely I can get my hands on frames that fit me and are different enough to make them teach me anything about geo. Maybe I'm wrong though.

  16. #16
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    Interesting thread...

    I have more than one bike and I am constantly tinkering with them but it looks like I am getting closer and closer to the perfect set-ups...



    My current stable. The black Kona has remained unchanged for some time now, I don't use it that much since I got the On-One singlespeed, anyway. The On-One is close to perfect, I got the frame new and build it with parts I already had. After a few changes it's spot on so I'll only change stuff on that if I need to. Like the wheelset, which is old, heavily used and worn so I'll replace that some time soon but otherwise it's just perfect. The roadbike is just a trainingtool to me so it doesn't get much attention just as the workhorse singlespeed roadbike. I do have some plans with the green Kona but I don't think much will change the coming season. Why not? Well, it's already functional as it is and I want to spend some more time with the current set-up before I decide what's a sensibkle upgrade.

    I am working on a new project building up a 29-er that I want to use both geared and SS though, this bike will replace the black Kona but I don't really consider that to be upgrading. I just like to experiment with something new once in a while and buiding bikes is a part of cycling that I enjoy a lot as well.

    I does occur to me that the more I ride, the less I spend on upgrades. If I have limited time to ride I spend more time browsing the internet contemplating and sometimes buying parts I don't really need. In short my cure for 'upgradingditis' is to get out and ride!

  17. #17
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    impossible. never could be done.

    (at least not for me)

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cr45h
    impossible. never could be done.

    (at least not for me)
    Your probably right but I'll just keep trying

  19. #19
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    My Bontrager

    I have owned the same Bontrager R5ace since 1994. It was great with gears, but I wanted something more racy, so I bought and sold a Merlin. then I wanted to try a FS bike, so I bought a Turner 5Spot. -Great bike - and I converted the Bontrager to SS. Kept the Stem, saddle, post and pedals. everything else got swapped to high quality, durable parts, and lighter where available, but the bike still fits and feels like an extension of my body.

    I have a custom 29er which has a lot of bliingy parts on it, and it also fits and rides great, but nothing feels so "just right" as my Bontrager....
    "Welcome to my underground lair...."

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDDIE JONES
    This is my IndyFab 29er SS. It has cured me of upgraditis because

    1. It has never broke even under my 280lb azz

    2. It has perfect gearing for me in Alabama 34/20

    3. I had it built with no cost limitations just the way I wanted it

    4. It has the perfect geometry for me

    5. Every part on it was carefully thought out before final selection and there isn't another one like it anywhere close by

    What kind of fork is on there?
    2008 Rig

  21. #21
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    There can never really be a "perfect" bike. If you ride long enough the parts wear out or break. Inevitably you get to a point where some new part will interest you, be it because it's better and/or lighter or just plain nicer. And let's not forget good ole EBay, one day you type in a crazy expensive part you would never get and there it is for peanuts and voila "upgrade". I've had my LTS1 for 9 years so naturally it has been "upgraded" but only when something breaks.

  22. #22
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    I have a stable of horses for courses. I can't really say I get upgradeitis since I never buy anything that's an upgrade, I just replace things constantly. My cross bikes are still 9 speed, my geared bike does have a bling wheel set on it but I paid a fraction of cost and would never dream of spending that kinda money on an upgrade if I hadn't, and my single speed is in it's $500 stock state; all of those bikes seem to be pretty perfect for me.

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