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  1. #1
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    optimus ti me

    i like the look of the Vassago optimus but am wondering about the horizontal drops/disc brakes. Other than that the thing looks sweet!

  2. #2
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    It has horizontal drops and is disc only.............................................. .

  3. #3
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    Exactly, LHD. Thats got me wondering. guess the disc mount braze-on must have the caliper sitting at a height and angle that allow the wheel to slide straight back and out without the rotor contacting the inside of the caliper.

  4. #4
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    They have slotted disc mounts.
    I guess this allows you to adjust your brakes with your wheel ?? [ Ive only seen pictures.]


  5. #5
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    May be extra maint. as chain stretches the wheels position moves further back. Will this not require adjusting the brake caliper?

    Probably not much more adjusting and screwing around with than a sQ!ueaky ebb.

  6. #6
    I've broken one of those!
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    I have similar dropouts and caliper mounting on my monocog. I haven't had the need to adjust the caliper position for chain stretch. When I change the cog size, however, adjustment is needed.

    Hope that helps.
    "It's not his fault that he's an adorable, unstoppable killing machine."

  7. #7
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    Sounds like minimal issues with this setup. With a tugnut i could still use a QR wheel t!oo.

  8. #8
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    I'm assuming it's the same design that they use on the jabberwocky, which supposedly allows wheel removal without having to fiddle with the brake caliper. Looks like the drops are angled down a bit to facilitate this.

    And if your chain is stretching to the point that you're having to adjust your wheel position, it's time for a new chain.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by long hazy daze
    ...

    And if your chain is stretching to the point that you're having to adjust your wheel position, it's time for a new chain.
    Hey LHD,

    Hmmm... in my experience the one time I'm sure to have to adjust my wheel position for chain stretch is right after installing a new chain...

    That "first ride chain stretch" always gets me. Not so much you, eh?

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by long hazy daze
    I'm assuming it's the same design that they use on the jabberwocky, which supposedly allows wheel removal without having to fiddle with the brake caliper. Looks like the drops are angled down a bit to facilitate this.

    And if your chain is stretching to the point that you're having to adjust your wheel position, it's time for a new chain.
    You are correct and it works fine. I rarely have to mess with my caliper.

    It's a good design.
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  11. #11
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    looks like a surly.

    changing cogs and tires required loosening the brake calipre which was a pain to me.

    a bolt on hub would be highly recommended.

  12. #12
    Jabberwocky Jockey
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtdirt223
    looks like a surly.

    changing cogs and tires required loosening the brake calipre which was a pain to me.

    a bolt on hub would be highly recommended.

    It is not a Surly.

    You do not have to loosen the caliper to remove the rear wheel.
    Calling out from the Land of the Riding Hillbilly.


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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkwing Duck
    It is not a Surly.

    You do not have to loosen the caliper to remove the rear wheel.
    It doesn't seem significantly different. FWIW, I didn't have to mess with the caliper to remove the wheel on my KM, but I compromised pad/rotor contact a bit to get it that way.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkwing Duck
    It is not a Surly.

    You do not have to loosen the caliper to remove the rear wheel.

    i know it isnt a surly. the rear setup, the drops and brake mount, look like a surly.

    and, i did have to loosen the hope calipre to remove the rear wheel on my surly.

    thanks for playing.

  15. #15
    rocky iv style
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    i understand why you say it looks like a surly, but i ran a surly for close to four years and understand the issue with having to move the caliper. before the shop i work for decided to sell vassago, another employee and i were both interested so i called them with very specific questions about single speed setups. kris told me that there would be no need to move the caliper to get the wheel in and out, and this was absolutely one of the selling points for me. it is a subtle difference at quick glance between the dropouts of the jabberwocky and the karate monkey in terms of where the caliper mounts are, but its enough to require movement of the caliper on the monkey and not on the jabberwocky. i'm pretty sure i asked kris about the same thing when this bike came out and i believe i got the same answer...the caliper mount allows it to be on the front side of the rotor so it does not contact it on the way out. again...i do work for a shop that sells vassago. we also sell surly as well as other single speeds. i'm merely giving my opinion having ridden both a surly and a vassago as singles.

  16. #16
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    The Optimus Ti looks way more like a Surly than it looks like a Jabberwocky
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  17. #17
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    No need to move the caliper if you set it up correctly

    I run 34x17t, 18t, and 19t on my Surly 1x1 with Avid BB7's and I don't need to adjust the brake caliper at all to remove the wheel or swap cogs. The chain is set so 17t is in the middle of the track end, 18 moves it a bit closer in, and 19 closer still. Same chain. No issues. No moving the brake.

    If I were to run an 18t or larger tooth cog all the way forward in the drops, yes I'd have to move the caliper to remove the wheel, but running it that way I'd lose the ability to swap to larger rings without breaking a chain to add links, who does that anyway?

    I like the Vassago due to it being like my Surly. Simple and elegant. No fuss.

    (Note: It also depends on the caliper and rotor combos, so take "correctly" with a grain of salt)

  18. #18
    rocky iv style
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    called and talked to them a little bit ago...shouldn't have to move the caliper.

    definitely looks different than the jabber but according to them it shouldn't matter.

  19. #19
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    I am not a habitual cog swapper. I ran my KM at 32:19.

    As you point out, it depend on gear combo, rotor and caliper. "Correctness" has nothing to do with it.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Hey LHD,

    Hmmm... in my experience the one time I'm sure to have to adjust my wheel position for chain stretch is right after installing a new chain...

    That "first ride chain stretch" always gets me. Not so much you, eh?

    --Sparty
    I thought it was implied by the term "time for a new one" that I was referring to an older, more worn chain........

  21. #21
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    The website also shows nearly 18" chainstays on all three sizes. I know the bikes are hailed as great handling. I've looked into the whole chainstay debate and have reached the conclusion that other aspects of the geometry have to be taken into consideration. Is the Vassago hype for real?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by long hazy daze
    I thought it was implied by the term "time for a new one" that I was referring to an older, more worn chain........
    I think maybe we're looking through opposite ends of the same telescope...

    What I'm saying is immediately after installing a new chain, I have to adjust my rear wheel position following the first ride or two due to chain "stretch." Doing so does not mean it's time for a new chain... after all I just installed a new one. After that, the chain is "stretched" and does not require much further wheel repositioning for the life of the chain.

    Maybe we're saying the same thing only in different ways...?

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by z rocks
    The website also shows nearly 18" chainstays on all three sizes. I know the bikes are hailed as great handling. I've looked into the whole chainstay debate and have reached the conclusion that other aspects of the geometry have to be taken into consideration. Is the Vassago hype for real?
    You have to ride one and be the judge but yeah, it is. I'll admit the numbers look funny compared to other bikes but the whole wet cat geometry thing works.

    The bikes handle great. (for the record, I ride east coast tight, twisty, rocky, rooty type stuff).

    I was hooked after one ride.
    Calling out from the Land of the Riding Hillbilly.


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  24. #24
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    hmm... so the wet cat is fur real. I wonder where they position the axle in the dropout to attain that chainstay length. Back in the day chainstays over 16.8" horrified me. But that was on a "small" wheeled bike. I'll call them and see how the customer service is.

    Maybe 18" works on the 'sago due to the longish top?tube. Two wheeled ocean liner might just tame the trails here.

  25. #25
    You know, for kids
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    I've not ridden many frames...just a stock MonoCog, rigid Fisher Rig, and a Mono9 (with and without squishy fork). My Jabberwocky just feels the best to me out of the bunch. It seems to be the one that works with me the most. It's point and shoot biking, climbs easily, rolls over everything, and turns feel quick and sharp.

    I've never had any issues pulling the rear wheel out without adjusting the brake caliper. It slides in/out perfectly.

    There is also about an inch of adjustability on the rear dropouts so that chainstay length can vary slightly. I ordered a 17T cog yesterday for my Profile hub which will drop a tooth. The axle already sits at the end of the dropouts with the 18T so I'm looking forward to taking a link of chain out and shortening that wheelbase. I'm already impressed with it like it's pictured below but I think with a 1/2" or so shorter wheelbase on the rear the handling will be even better...


    I am looking forward to the Optimus Ti frame. I've been seriously considering getting one for myself.
    disclaimer: I sell and repair bicycles

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