One nine Alum - Wide Carbon wheels- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    One nine Alum - Wide Carbon wheels

    Ok folks. I have a "real first world" problem. I have analysis paralysis. I can tell you how much every carbon wheel set in various hub config. weighs(tongue in cheek). I am trying to build a "simple SS". I went from zeroing in a Sir 9, to a Pivot les, to a Ibis Tranny 29. Yes, money is an issue, no duh?
    I want to invest in solid parts that can move from frame to frame, namely Nox teocalli's with I-9s. Starting with this criteria is like starting with a double bogey on the first hole, when keeping "budget score". That's golf. Back to biking. But a great set of wheels will translate to "every future bike". And I do not want to waste valuable pesos on an "excellent frame- cheap parts kit bike". I can get a "less than $500" alum frame as opposed to a $1700- $2000 new carbon frame, and start riding relatively soon, instead of waiting for a rich uncle to pass away, which I can't seem to locate.
    So here's the quick question. How would a set of teocalli's on a One Nine aluminum Niner ride? How would the combo of alum frame and carbon wheel set ride? In other words, would a carbon seatpost and fat low pressure tires & rims, help keep the aluminum frame's back end "on the ground" as opposed to bucking like some say? I will only race occasionally, and tend to ride super chunky - rocky, steep - hilly trails with short bursts and quick downhills. I realize this is not the preferred set-up, but I am looking for a new kind of suffer test with this bike.
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  2. #2
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    I would do a nice steel frame with wide rims and fat tires 2.35 or larger.

    I have a Surly Karate Monkey and love how the steel frame feels compared to some very stiff alum hardtails I have had in the past. I am not a weight weinie racer and don't have to have the lightest of everything, but I sure do enjoy a back and shoulders that aren't beat up after a long ride.

  3. #3
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    I keep hearing this same sentiment over and over, it is becoming clear now. Steel frames are more of a "joy" to ride in comparison to aluminum. Perhaps this is why we are seeing less and less aluminum frames? Anyway that is a mute point. Perhaps a Sir 9 with the Teo's and a few other carbon parts will make for a nice ride- reasonable light SS. I "assume" the Sir 9's tire clearance will allow for a 30 mm carbon rim with some 2.4s mounted? Has anyone noticed the head angle of the Sir 9 (72 ish vs 69 for new frames) being a hindrance when descending the steep stuff?
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  4. #4
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    Don't fall for the romance of the steel frame until you get a chance to ride one (or a few). Not all frames are created equal and there are some steel frames out there with all the stiffness of a typical aluminum frame but with a massive weight penalty.

    Personal preference plays a bigger role than frame material when it comes to enjoying the ride.
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  5. #5
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    You can get a Niner One 9 RDO carbon for around $1,200.

    I had a steel salsa el mariachi with everything carbon except the frame and now have the one 9 rdo with carbon everything. On rough trails, strava shows I'm faster on the light carbon bike. Comfort was very similar between the 2. If anything I think the stays on the carbon bike give a little more and track the rough ground better.

  6. #6
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    A1an- Exactly. I currently ride a Carbon Tallboy. That bike is soooo easy to ride. I agree, but living in a "relatively remote" region makes bike shopping abit challenging. Finding a demo Ibis "tranny" might be akin to finding an Ivory Billed Woodpecker! I am certainly not trying to minimize the importance of trying some steel framed bikes before burping up cash. I think finding a Sir 9 to demo would be pretty easy.
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  7. #7
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    coke- Question? Owning the carbon one 9 Rdo do you find it's geometry "too race oriented"? Given a 3-4 hr ride with variable terrain including steep climbs -descents would you (provided it had a suspension front) choose it over the El Mariachi for that purpose?
    I've noticed the price drops on the One 9 RDOs. They are only $200 more than a Sir 9 Steel frame. Makes me wonder if a new 9 One RDO is on the way with a "slacker front".
    Last edited by fat-but-slow; 12-19-2015 at 05:54 AM.
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    This should be a sweet set up. I am currently running an aluminum Santacruz Highball with an Enve fork, seat post, and wheels and it rides great. That said I'm selling the frame for something steel. If you are willing to spend a bit more the Vassago Verhauen is a great choice for steel. Also they are on sale on their site right now. Hard to beat an american made ox platinum frame for less then 1k.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by fat-but-slow View Post
    coke- Question? Owning the carbon one 9 Rdo do you find it's geometry "too race oriented"? Given a 3-4 hr ride with variable terrain including steep climbs -descents would you (provided it had a suspension front) choose it over the El Mariachi for that purpose?
    I've noticed the price drops on the One 9 RDOs. They are only $200 more than a Sir 9 Steel frame. Makes me wonder if a new 9 One RDO is on the way with a "slacker front".
    It's a very nimble bike. It takes some focus on downhills but it makes up for that everywhere else. Mostly rider dependent, but i have no trouble keeping up with full suspension bikes. As long as it's not too rough, it's the best cornering bike I've ever ridden. I really like the el mar except when really pushing on rough downhills. The steel has a spring to it that makes it more difficult to control, similar to a shock with too fast rebound. Carbon is sometimes a little rougher but it's a lot more predictable.

    As far as comfort, tire choice and pressure has a bigger impact than frame material.

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