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  1. #1
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    Noob seeking advice from experienced SS'ers

    First I'd like to say hello and thanks to all the riders in this forum and the biking community for any and all help you provide in the future . So as the title says I am a noob, not so much to biking but to this forum. I have done my fair amount of research but still need some tips and advice from some of you experienced folk. With that being said I've decided to drink the kool-aid (as per SS forum members refer to as going single speed). I just recently converted my bike from a 3x8 to a 1x8 and that was a big improvement but even then it was too problematic. The chain keeps falling off and the derailleur needs constant adjustments, not to mention the ridiculous amounts of noise it makes on descents and rocky sections. I figure going SS will cure my ailment and make me stronger will I'm at it. The questions I have for you guys are.

    Freewheel VS COG, is one better than the other? What's really the difference there?

    26" VS 29", will having a 26" impair my SS ability? I notice most guys on the trails have 29" SS.

    Do I really need a new chain and chain ring? Can't I just take some links out of the old chain?

    For reference purposes I have a 09' Scott Aspect 45. The cranks are Shimano FC-M341, 42/32/22 and the rear cogs are Shimano CS HG40, 11-30, 8-speed.

  2. #2
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    Aha! I've answered one of my own questions. I didn't see the FAQ section on SS at first. I guess I'll have to run a regular cog since I have disc brakes.

  3. #3
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    J3SSEB - since you have the freehub-style rear wheel - just get an inexpensive SS kit - you can find them for about $25 or so. Spacers, chain tensioner, you can use your front middle ring, but you will need either SS 'ring bolts, spacer "washers" or a bashring (my rec) to take up the space of the longer chainring bolts. Make sure you get the chainline as straight as possible and give it a go. Riding rigid, 29" wheels are better over bumps and roll a little faster. They also make your gearing a bit taller for a given ring/cog combo. If you have a 26" now - try it out - fairly inexpensive. If you decide you like it, then when you're ready, shop for a new SS-specific bike if you think you need it. Try the larger wheel vs. the 26" and see if you like it. FWIW, I went 29" and have never really looked back. Good luck and have fun.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  4. #4
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    ATB Scott, thanks for the advice. I was a bit confused on the hub style but you cleared things up for me. I'm going to go ahead and do it as soon as I buy the kit and get the proper tools....and I'll post pics as well.

  5. #5
    dwt
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    One thing to keep in mind if you want to run tubeless: No 29'er UST to date.

    A lot of the 26'er crowd run rigid forks, and tubeless softens the ride appreciably. There are many tubeless options for 26'ers, from full UST to ghetto conversions.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  6. #6
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    dwt: yeah I actually run tubeless now. So maybe I'll just pony up and get a 29" as well.

    My LBS just quoted me on a single speed kit for $40. It comes with 2 cogs, spacers and the tensioner plus $15 to install it. Is that a good deal?

  7. #7
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    I'd save the $15 and do it yourself its REALLY easy to do. Plus you can just google a how to most have videos.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  8. #8
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    Not bad for $55.00 installed. You can find one for less on line. Which kit is it? Not all are created the same.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  9. #9
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    fyi, the 29er thing isnt neccesarily better, it's just a preference for some people. PLENTY of people still prefer 26ers. I've owned both and went back to 26". Not saying one is better than the other for everyone, but just try one before you buy it.
    Order a decent conversion kit and install it yourself and save a few bucks. It's good to have the hands on experience because you'll probably be changing gears every so often and you'll want to do it yourself.

  10. #10
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    +1 for 26 :)

    I really hope this thread turns into a 26 v. 29 grudge match. that always turns out.

    Honestly, the right advice is try it as cheap as possible (some sort of kit) at first, if you decide you like it, then dump the money in as you see fit. And if you have tons of money but not time, there is no shame in paying to have work done. Then you also have someone point blame at. Most everyone else has no money and a little time. We work on our own bikes.

    Post pics!
    no chain no gain.

  11. #11
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    I'd save the $15 and do it yourself its REALLY easy to do. Plus you can just google a how to most have videos.
    Yeah it looks pretty easy, I just don't have the tools for it. Either way I would spend the money on tools or labor...guess I'd rather have the tools. I know I need a chain tool to break the chain and a lockring removal tool, but do I really need a chain whip? Can't I just use some channel locks or something to grab hold of it?

    Not bad for $55.00 installed. You can find one for less on line. Which kit is it? Not all are created the same.
    I actually didn't ask I know...

    Honestly, the right advice is try it as cheap as possible (some sort of kit) at first, if you decide you like it, then dump the money in as you see fit
    Im in the process of trying to trade my derailleur and junk for a SS kit on Craigslist. So I really won't spend any money

    Also, as far as tensioners goes. Which would work better for a XC/Trails application, spring loaded or no spring?
    Last edited by J3SSEB; 04-18-2010 at 06:11 AM.

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