Non Drive reverse tensioner idea needed- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Non Drive reverse tensioner idea needed

    OK, I need a way to stop the non drive side from slipping backwards in the dropouts.

    I am on a Vasago Jabberwocky with Hadley hubs with a 10mm bolt on through axel. It is torqued to Hadleys standard. I have added a washer to each side with crosshatched grooves and I have done the same to the drop outs and nothing I have done up to this point has stopped the non drive side from slipping backwards. I had the same problem with my Inbred.
    Apparently, though I am not fast I torque the crap out of the rear end.

    I was considering getting a BMX chain tensioner and putting it in in reverse but figured I might as well ask to see if anyone has a better/simpler/smarter idea.

  2. #2
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    make sure the dropouts are bare metal. You want metal on metal contact to prevent slipping on the paint.

  3. #3
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    are you using a tensioner on the drive side?

  4. #4
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    Both sides have stop bolts, they can't move forward once set.
    Like I said, the dropouts have been crasshatched by me. I did that by cleaning off all the paint and filing XXX's across the outside to eliminate sliding.

    Nothing works, which is fine, I was just wondering if anyone had an elegant solution besides a reverse tugnut.

  5. #5
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Tighten it more than the torque spec. Don't worry, you wont destroy it.

  6. #6
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    stop using your rear brake

    Seriously though the brake is doing it, maybe reduce the rotor size to reduce the leverage the brake has. I run a 140mm with no issue as that will happily lock the back up if required.

    More companies should use a chain stay mount to prevent this from happening

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by roybatty666
    stop using your rear brake

    Seriously though the brake is doing it, maybe reduce the rotor size to reduce the leverage the brake has. I run a 140mm with no issue as that will happily lock the back up if required.

    More companies should use a chain stay mount to prevent this from happening
    I use my rear brake about as often as my wife uses me, which after twenty years is to say, not at all. Hell, I might get more than my rear brake come to think of it.
    As far as over tightening goes, I'll pass. The axel is aluminum and I have no desire to strip it and then have to wait probably weeks for a replacement.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorBehavior
    I was considering getting a BMX chain tensioner and putting it in in reverse but figured I might as well ask to see if anyone has a better/simpler/smarter idea.
    Putting something like these/this in reverse?


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mijome07
    Putting something like these/this in reverse?
    Yes, on the non drive side. That is the only thing I can figure that will stop the problem.
    However, I was hoping someone would have some incredibly obvious and simple answer besides that. Bar that I am going to buy/fabricate something.
    Those look like the Redline tugs, probably what I am going to buy.

  10. #10
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    Technically, what you are looking for in not a "tensioner".

    Quote Originally Posted by roybatty666
    Seriously though the brake is doing it, maybe reduce the rotor size to reduce the leverage the brake has. I run a 140mm with no issue as that will happily lock the back up if required.
    More companies should use a chain stay mount to prevent this from happening
    Smaller rotors increase the forces at the axle. It a leverage thing between the wheel diameter and rotor. Larger rotors decrease the forces at the dropout/axle/track-mount, but increase the load on the caliper frame mount.

    Chain stay calipers on track mounts are the way to go.

  11. #11
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    I used to have that same problem. I solved it by purposely tightening the hub in place with the wheel angled towards the drive side, i.e: not centered. I'd go for quick ride in the driveway and hit the rear brake hard. The force from the brake would pull the wheel straight. It never seemed to move after that.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 12snap
    I used to have that same problem. I solved it by purposely tightening the hub in place with the wheel angled towards the drive side, i.e: not centered. I'd go for quick ride in the driveway and hit the rear brake hard. The force from the brake would pull the wheel straight. It never seemed to move after that.
    That's a damn interesting idea. Once it shifts it seems to stay so maybe I need to give your technique a shot, thanks for the idea.

  13. #13
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    Snag a steel chainring bolt meant for a single ring setup and bolt it into your dropout TIGHTER THAN TIGHT directly behind the axle. if that doesn't work, go get a grade 8 10x1mm bolt and matching nut and torque these f***ers down in the dropout. your axle aint gonna go nowhere!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScaryJerry
    Snag a steel chainring bolt meant for a single ring setup and bolt it into your dropout TIGHTER THAN TIGHT directly behind the axle. if that doesn't work, go get a grade 8 10x1mm bolt and matching nut and torque these f***ers down in the dropout. your axle aint gonna go nowhere!
    That's the sh*t I'm talking about! Actually I have some aluminum bar stock and your idea just made me think that I can cut it to fit in the dropout. Put a hole in it and bolt in into place butted up against the axel, that way I have a little standoff between the axel and my new "stay" bolt.
    Thanks Scary, too obvious for me to see, I had been over thinking the whole thing. I owe you a beer.

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