Nokian extreme and Single speeding- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    brother on a mission
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    Nokian extreme and Single speeding

    For those of you who patrol the other forums, please excuse the crosspost.

    I have a couple of quick questions,

    I have just ordered some Nokian extreme 29xs. I am going to mounting them on my single speed. I know that they will be almost twice as heavy as the tires I have been running (wire bead hutchinson mosquitos, don't ask, they were free), but they should give me slightly more traction on the ice and snow .

    For those of you who single speed in the winter, do you put a largerr cog on the back to compensate for the increased weight of the tires and the increased rolling resistance?

    I was also wondering if anyone knew the approximate width of a mounted Nokian extreme 2.1? I am going to be mounting them on my fairly narrow cheapo 1992 OEM rims. I was wondering how the width will compare to the Hutchinson 2.1s that are on the bike now? (Shiggy does not have the extremes on his website).

    Thanks in advance for your opinions.
    GF

  2. #2
    the wrench
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    hutchisons are usually oversized so the nokinans will probably be slightly narrower
    do it, do it DO IT!!
    DOOOO IIIIIT!!

  3. #3
    I am the owl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenfix
    For those of you who single speed in the winter, do you put a largerr cog on the back to compensate for the increased weight of the tires and the increased rolling resistance?
    Nope, run what ya brung. But then again, I'm lazy and don't switch out gears for any conditions.
    SingleSpeedOutlaw .com
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  4. #4
    Out spokin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenfix
    ...For those of you who single speed in the winter, do you put a largerr cog on the back to compensate for the increased weight of the tires and the increased rolling resistance?...GF
    I run the same gear year round, regardless of heavier tires plus mucky, slippery, sticky mud that's harder to ride through.

    Last year I tried putting a lower gear on and found that I got more fatigued trying to spin a lower gear than I did just pounding my usual gear. It was weird, but that's what happened to me.

    --Sparty
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    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  5. #5
    brother on a mission
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    Thanks for the advice.

    I'll stick with the current gearing. I am a little concerned that I will not have enough chainstay clearance for the nokians, but I will have to address that when I get the tires. The hutchinsons run tightly, and when I ride them in the show, the ice that builds up on the tires hits the chainstay. Someone posted on another site that the nokians are more like 1.95 than 2.10, so maybe I will be alright.

    Thanks again,

    GF

  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    very heavy tires, but I stay upright!

    I run some home-made studded tires for riding all winter. they are so heavy i'm afraid to weigh them. i run the same gears as summer riding, but i go slower on flat or rolling terrain, so the gearing works out ok. i just can't clear many hills or slopes in the snow, mainly due to the resistance of snow, traction in snow, but also a little due to tire weight. my only issue is that on one of my two SS bikes, the chainstays are very close to the spikes emerging from my tires. so, this winter, i'm riding the BuSS (wider chainstays) on studs.
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  7. #7
    brother on a mission
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cygnus
    I run some home-made studded tires for riding all winter. they are so heavy i'm afraid to weigh them. i run the same gears as summer riding, but i go slower on flat or rolling terrain, so the gearing works out ok. i just can't clear many hills or slopes in the snow, mainly due to the resistance of snow, traction in snow, but also a little due to tire weight. my only issue is that on one of my two SS bikes, the chainstays are very close to the spikes emerging from my tires. so, this winter, i'm riding the BuSS (wider chainstays) on studs.
    Nice looking Pic cygnus. Where was it taken? I ran some home made studs this past weekend (15 year old farmer jon's nephews). I had pretty good traction on the ice, but the snow was a different story. I also broke through some ice on one section of the trail, and it cut partway through the nylon sidewall of the tires. It was my first time running studded tires, and I liked it well enough that I figured I would go through with the Nokian's to save me some time (and money in the longrun).

    Cheers,
    GF

  8. #8
    I am the owl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenfix
    I had pretty good traction on the ice, but the snow was a different story.
    Studs don't do anything for the snow. For that, you need to drop your tire pressure. I usually run about half of my normal pressure. Sounds low, but you'll get amazing results.
    SingleSpeedOutlaw .com
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  9. #9
    brother on a mission
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    Quote Originally Posted by riderx
    Studs don't do anything for the snow. For that, you need to drop your tire pressure. I usually run about half of my normal pressure. Sounds low, but you'll get amazing results.
    Thanks,

    I'll try that. The tires had a fairly round profile and were 1.95s. They were also used pretty heavily before they were studded, so there was not much tread left on the back tire. It was close to riding one of those deep tread hybrid style tires.

    I ride in NH/VT, and we do not really have a lot of snow. There were a couple of deep patches on sections of the trail that were heavily shaded. Most of what is in the woods is melt from our last thaw that froze in the middle of the trails. A couple of sections were like riding on a frozen stream (up and down).

    Any recommendations on tire pressure with the Nokian extremes? I wiegh around 180 (170-185), and typically ride my tires at the lowest recommended pressure rating.

    Thanks again for the pointer.

    GF

  10. #10
    I am the owl
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    I would only run the low pressure if the trails are completely snow covered, not just patchy. In the snow I like wide tires (well, I like those almost all of the time). As for recommended pressure, I can't answer that. Depends on your riding style, tire width, your weight, etc. Luckily air is free and experimenting is easy. Good luck
    SingleSpeedOutlaw .com
    Riding Bikes and Drinking Beer.

  11. #11
    brother on a mission
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    Quote Originally Posted by riderx
    Luckily air is free and experimenting is easy. Good luck
    Thanks.

    I am not sure if you are the ssoutlaw riderx, but if you are, it is nice to read that your thumb is getting better. Your page is one of the reasons I am now single speeding.

    If you are not that riderx I hope your thumb is feels good anyway.

    cheers.

    (edit: I checked your profile, I guess you are that riderx.)

  12. #12
    mtbr member
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    studs

    The photo (and this one too) is on mendenhall lake (frozen) in front of mendenhall glacier near juneau, ak. the extremes will last alot longer than my stainless steel screws in my heavy tires. mine hold up fine on snow and ice, but wear on pavement. you'll like the nokian tires; i've heard they work fine and last a long time.
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