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  1. #1
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    New SS CRANK... (porn)

    Got this from the guys at FSA but I had to remove their rings and put on a single ... Cant wait to race it
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  2. #2
    JMH
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    Sugary Exoskeleton
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    Um...

    ...schwing!

  3. #3
    Cold. Blue. Steel.
    Reputation: OneGearGuy's Avatar
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    A real beauty of a combo.

    Would it be stronger to run the ring in the outboard position where it better supports the carbon spider? That's what I am doing with my new Shizmano 762 XT's.
    Enjoy and let us know how they ride.

    OGG
    Spinning and Grinning...

  4. #4
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    just wondering

    but how does running the ring on the outside of the spider provide more strength? Can't say I have ever considered that there is any difference between the middle and outer ring on the spider. I am not tring to be funny or mean, just would like to see some info or opinions one way or the other. Ed

  5. #5
    Cold. Blue. Steel.
    Reputation: OneGearGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarkinsmel
    but how does running the ring on the outside of the spider provide more strength? Can't say I have ever considered that there is any difference between the middle and outer ring on the spider. I am not tring to be funny or mean, just would like to see some info or opinions one way or the other. Ed
    I will attempt to illustrate with words (tougher to do ).
    When you look at the design of a standard, triple crank arm spider, it is shaped to accept a chainring in the outboard position (and on the inside position). It is indented, for lack of a better term, to hold the part of the chainring where it bolts down. This creates a unified, level surface when the ring is in place. The middle ring sits on the back side of this assembly and creates a sandwich with the outer ring. The spider is thus supported on both sides. When you remove the outer ring, you not only lose structural support of said "spider sandwich," but the front side of the spider is unsupported. If the ring is outboard, you once again complete the structure between the chainring and the crank spider.
    The amount of torque being applied to a crank on a SS is huge, and I have heard of spiders breaking and shearing off under load. I also replaced the bolts that secure the granny ring on the back side to furthuer reinforce and unify the crank. After all, it was built to hold three rings and have bolts in those locations.
    That's my 2 cents. Hope it makes sense!

    OGG
    Spinning and Grinning...

  6. #6
    Steel and teeth.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneGearGuy
    I will attempt to illustrate with words (tougher to do ).
    When you look at the design of a standard, triple crank arm spider, it is shaped to accept a chainring in the outboard position (and on the inside position). It is indented, for lack of a better term, to hold the part of the chainring where it bolts down. This creates a unified, level surface when the ring is in place. The middle ring sits on the back side of this assembly and creates a sandwich with the outer ring. The spider is thus supported on both sides. When you remove the outer ring, you not only lose structural support of said "spider sandwich," but the front side of the spider is unsupported. If the ring is outboard, you once again complete the structure between the chainring and the crank spider.
    The amount of torque being applied to a crank on a SS is huge, and I have heard of spiders breaking and shearing off under load. I also replaced the bolts that secure the granny ring on the back side to furthuer reinforce and unify the crank. After all, it was built to hold three rings and have bolts in those locations.
    That's my 2 cents. Hope it makes sense!

    OGG

    If this were a true concern, a bashguard would be the best solution (especially for maintaining a perfect chainline with dedicated SS rear hubs).

    If in doubt, contact FSA. They will give you the most qualified answer.

    Otherwise, that is a beautiful crank! What is the total build?

    b1umb0y

  7. #7
    Trail rider and racer
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    Lovely!
    Trev!

  8. #8
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    ...mmmmm, yummy...


    R.

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