New Bike Question- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    New Bike Question

    I picked up a new (used) frame from a bud on the board, and built it up with old parts. It has sliding dropouts, and I used my old steel qr's. On my first ride last night I had a blast, but the chain would loosen and come off, causing me to wreck. I was trying to figure out which way to go to prevent this from happening again. I'd like to keep it cheap for now, but I want a solution that will be safe.
    1- I could just get a surly tugnut, and that should do it.
    2- Get tugnut and new rings. I am currently using salvaged ramped rings front and rear.
    3- Have the LBS build me up an inexpensive singlespeed wheel, and probably still run tugnut.
    Thanks for the help. I really enjoyed the ride, and see the allure. I've actually been intimidated by singlespeeding, but found it to be easier than expected, though I still walked some. It's funny, but I usually pedal a 30lb + fs rig, so my legs were up to the task, but damn do my arms and shoulders feel it today. I do interval training at the gym so the rest/recover bit was cool.

    Thanks Again,
    Ken

  2. #2
    Not really that big!
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    Tugnut...

    will work great. You can spend more money on rings,cogs, etc. if needed, but start with a tugnut. Make sure you read the thread on what got you hooked... you'll be there soon. It's only a natural progression!!

  3. #3
    Misfit Psycles
    Reputation: nogearshere's Avatar
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    on QR you are going to need some sort of tug, at least on the drive side. that should only set you back $15/pr...ride that for a while and decide for sure what other parts you need before dropping money on a ss wheel...

    it won't be long before you catch upgradeitous anyway...
    Expert of the Internet.
    BECAUSE I SAID SO

  4. #4
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    Tugnut or similar device....

    Depending on how much you have and want to spend, I would start with buying a Tugnut. I run a Redline chain tensioner works just like the Tugnut, just not at cool looking. That should solve your problems. Also, since you are running used, ramped rings you really have to get the chain line right on. In my experience, non-ramped rings and cogs allow for a little more "error" in the chainline so that would be a worth while expense, especially after you figure out what gear ratio you want to run.

    Another option is to have the LBS or you can do it yourself convert your current wheel to a bolt-on axle. I have not done this, but there are quite a few threads around here describing it. It can be done pretty cheap and might be all you need to do.

    Just my .02 cents

  5. #5
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    I have no experience w/ the tugnutt and qr's...it might work, but I'd be worried about the skewer bending under the force of the rear wheel sliding. I have used one on the inside of the fork end...so the tugnut is holding the axle rather than the qr...but that would require a slight (approx 2.5mm) respace of the hub...pretty easy actually because you wouldn't have to redish the wheel.

    I'd at least get a shimano DX cog or similar...something with big tall teeth that aren't ramped...you'll be surprised at how much better it holds a chain than ramped cogs off a cassette.

  6. #6
    Hoopy Frood
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    Did the wheel slip?

    I'm a little unclear on what is causing the chain to loosen and fall off. It could be a couple of things:

    (a) The wheel is slipping forward in the dropouts and removing tension from the chain which causes it to fall off.

    (b) The ramped rings are dropping the chain but the wheel isn't sliding forward

    (c) Your chainline is off and causing the chain to drop

    If the QR is at fault, you'll definitely notice the wheel slipping forward in the dropouts and then a chain tug is in order. If you don't notice the wheel slipping, it's probably the ramped cog or your chainline (or you don't have enough tension to begin with).

    I use old school steel QR's without a chain tug on my 1x1 and haven't had any slippage (knock on wood) but you really need to crank them down to make sure they hold tight. I'm also using a BMX cog and have a straight chainline so no derailments so far (even with a couple bad crashes).

    YMMV
    I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. - Thomas Jefferson

  7. #7
    I am the owl
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    For less than the cost of a Tugnut you can buy a threaded axle and convert the wheel to bolt-on.

    Solid Axles
    SingleSpeedOutlaw .com
    Riding Bikes and Drinking Beer.

  8. #8
    surlysoul
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    Dropouts

    I'm a little confused on what is slipping you said you have sliding dropouts. The other responses make sense if you have horizontal ends. If you have sliding vertical dropouts the dropouts may be slipping. I think on some of the earlier models people replaced the bolts with beefier bolts and lock washers to prevent this.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the input.

    I am using an oldschool steel qr. The hub is a cheapie shimano circa 1990. The shop set my chainline, and it looks good. They also gave me a DB tug, I assume is from a monocog. It is too short for my sliding dropouts. The frame is a fetish fixation, with horiz. dropouts. The chain would loosen a bit, and I had the qr's cranked. The funny thing is that the chain would stay on under extreme torque when climbing, but when I'd get out on the flats and try to fly, the chain would dump. Probably loosening on the climbs. I figure the surly tug would be longer, and more effective. I think the old salvaged 7spd 17t. rear cog is probably ok, but I'm using a set of salvaged Bontrager cranks, and the ring is pretty flimsy. I figured the ss chainrings probably have longer teeth, and are stiffer, which I am hoping would provide a little more security.

    Thanks.

  10. #10
    surlysoul
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    solid axle

    In that case I would agree with riderx and convert your hub to a solid axle first. Just me but if it was my bike this what I would do in this order.

    1) convert to solid axle

    2) replace rear cog with ss specific novatech is cheap

    3) Non ramped c/ring

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by surlysoul
    In that case I would agree with riderx and convert your hub to a solid axle first. Just me but if it was my bike this what I would do in this order.

    1) convert to solid axle

    2) replace rear cog with ss specific novatech is cheap

    3) Non ramped c/ring
    When I first built up my SS, I had a helluva time with chain drop. I was trying to go inexpensive, having already blown more than I had wanted, so was using a ramped cog in the rear. I went to a Surly SS cog in the rear and no more problem. I do have EBB, so the sliding axle in horizontal dropouts was a non-issue for me.
    Good luck and hava a blast.

  12. #12
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    Glad to hear you built up a single speed. Won't be long now till you sell of the Turner for a 29er.

    We should get together for a ride. I have goodies in my parts bin that could help you out. I have a tugnutt and also a set of the Travis Brown, Ti guide plates that are not being used. I also have have extra SS rings and cogs after changing gearing for the 29er.

    I'm off Sun. through Wed.

    Matt.

    Quote Originally Posted by kendogg
    I picked up a new (used) frame from a bud on the board, and built it up with old parts. It has sliding dropouts, and I used my old steel qr's. On my first ride last night I had a blast, but the chain would loosen and come off, causing me to wreck. I was trying to figure out which way to go to prevent this from happening again. I'd like to keep it cheap for now, but I want a solution that will be safe.
    1- I could just get a surly tugnut, and that should do it.
    2- Get tugnut and new rings. I am currently using salvaged ramped rings front and rear.
    3- Have the LBS build me up an inexpensive singlespeed wheel, and probably still run tugnut.
    Thanks for the help. I really enjoyed the ride, and see the allure. I've actually been intimidated by singlespeeding, but found it to be easier than expected, though I still walked some. It's funny, but I usually pedal a 30lb + fs rig, so my legs were up to the task, but damn do my arms and shoulders feel it today. I do interval training at the gym so the rest/recover bit was cool.

    Thanks Again,
    Ken

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