Need some advice on Redline MC Flight 29er- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Need some advice on Redline MC Flight 29er

    I just finished building my Redline MC Flight 29er. It has been amazing on the few rides I have done, probably the best combination of comfortable, responsive, light, and fast I've ever ridden.

    For most of the trails around here in Northern VA - like Quantico, Laurel Hill, Wakefield, and the network of trails around Reston - the bike is just fine as a rigid singlespeed 29er. But on Fountainhead (my favorite trail), where there are a lot of descents over root and rock gardens, I've come away feeling quite beat up.

    I'd like to get a suspension fork with remote lockout, but I love the weight and balance of the bike as is. I think the stock rigid fork is brilliant. On the other hand, my favorite trail is miserable on a rigid bike.

    I have considered the Motobecane SS 29er, which costs just a little more than a fork by itself, but I've never ridden one and I'm a little hesitant to buy a bike without riding it.

    Questions:

    1. What would you do in this situation? Slap a suspension fork on there or just leave it as is?
    2. What kind of suspension fork goes on this bike?

  2. #2
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    I ride Fountainhead quite a bit and after they rebuilt the first few miles of the beginning I usually bring my HT 26" there to have more fun than the 29er rigid allows.

    That said, I think Quantico is rougher than Fountainhead now and I still do both on my rigid. On my old bike (alum SE stout) with the stock alum fork, it would beat me up quite a bit. I tossed on a carbon fork and bars and it gave it just enough to take some of the harshness out of it to make the NOVA trails more bearable for the longer hauls.

    Don't know what tires you're running, but going with a Stans/UST setup with a larger volume tire might give it just enough give to avoid the weight penalty of a suspension fork that you'd likely end up locking out most of time time anyways.

    Either way, the carbon bars/fork with new tire would likely run you about as much ($200 fork, $75 bars, $50 tire, $50 stans setup) as a decent suspension fork, but you'd keep your geometry the same as it is now if you like it that much.

    If you want to just try a fork, ebay a reba 29er fork. You'd likely pay less than $200 for a used one. If you like it, keep it and/or upgrade. If you don't, sell it at very little loss to you.

  3. #3
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    I thought about a carbon fork but have zero experience with them on a MTB. Had one on a road bike a long time ago. I could see myself going for carbon for this bike. What brand/model would you recommend I look at first?

    I have Easton Monkeylite bars on there now, LOVE them. Didn't realize bars would make such a difference.

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    I ran the Easton Monkeylites before these carbon ones. When I swapped frames from the alum stout to a on-one steel inbred, I found a deal on carbon bars/stem and whether or not it made a difference, it just looks damned cool.

    I use an Origin 8 black ops and love it. White bros, origin 8, exotic, etc... all seem to be in the $200 range new on ebay. I don't think there's any noticeable difference between any of them other than looks and brand preference. The only reason I went with the Black Ops over others is because I thought it looked badass and it said "Black Ops" on it.

  5. #5
    Eli Broccoli
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    Monocog owner here.

    I would grab a really fat tire and go tubeless. Weight will be quiet a bit less than a fork and it will give you a bigger difference over a carbon bar or the like. 2.4 inch tire and 20psi should send you in the right direction.

  6. #6
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    Dudes, that's solid advice and low cost, which I also dig. What would you recommend for a good fat tire for the front? I'm running WTB Nanos right now.

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    You can get WTB 2.4's in the sub-$50 range pretty easily. I would go for a cheaper on off the bat (as opposed to an $80 tire in case you don't like it). Find them on sale somewhere, all the better. google shopping has wtb mutano for $42. Add in stans and you should be done for <$100... I'd go the 26" tube DIY rim strip if you need it.

    If you decide that's enough for you and it fixes things, then upgrade to lighter tires if you need it down the road. The mutano isn't a real knobby tire, but you shouldn't really need it in this area. I run spec fast trak 2.0's on mine tubeless and love them for this area. Have even raced on them (fountainhead, quantico, lodi, quarry, jrps, etc...) and they run fast. Might not *as* grippy as knobbier tires and they don't do well in mud, but when the hot summer days hit and you get them rolling on the hardpack, they rock.

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    We ride fountainhead and/or quantico a couple times a month. If you're around I'll shoot ya a message next time we head up that way and you can get my inbred (steel frame, carbon fork/bars) a try to see if it's something you want to spend money on and would work.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by 123elizxcvbnm View Post
    Monocog owner here.

    I would grab a really fat tire and go tubeless. Weight will be quiet a bit less than a fork and it will give you a bigger difference over a carbon bar or the like. 2.4 inch tire and 20psi should send you in the right direction.
    Amen brother! That's how I run my Monocog. Try the WTB Weirwolf 2.55 yeah!
    The unexamined life is not worth living - Socrates
    Bearded Women Racing

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fryed_1 View Post
    We ride fountainhead and/or quantico a couple times a month. If you're around I'll shoot ya a message next time we head up that way and you can get my inbred (steel frame, carbon fork/bars) a try to see if it's something you want to spend money on and would work.
    Sounds good, shoot me a PM (especially for Quanico rides). I live near there.

  11. #11
    Bollocks
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB View Post
    Amen brother! That's how I run my Monocog. Try the WTB Weirwolf 2.55 yeah!
    thats what i run on the front of my ss 26'er... pressured down, it soaks up many of the smaller rocks, roots etc and provides enough cushion on drops to be noticeable.
    You only live once but if you do it right, once is enough.

  12. #12
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    I've run steel and carbon forks - carbon won't make a big difference considering the cost. But the Nano up front must go, asap. And it won't be a money lost - just save it as a future replacement for the rear. Tubeless set-up too, eventually.

    I like to run my rear wheel as far forward in the dropouts as possible plus a shortish stem so I can get my weight off the front wheel on the tech/downhill stuff.

    I used to ride those same NoVa trals 10-15 years ago and now miss them. Happy trails.

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