My Winter Project came in the mail today....- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    My Winter Project came in the mail today....

    Planning on building it up this Winter after the holidays. I just hope I can handle the task.

    2000 Gary Fisher Aquila. Genesis Geometry. I have a whopping $41 in it. Bought it off EBay. My first real MTB was a 98 Aquila. I sold it in 2000 and wondered why I did ever since. The 98 was a steel bike. This one's Aluminum. This is going to be fun!
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    Last edited by TheBUNKY; 11-15-2004 at 09:27 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Planning on building it up this Winter after the holidays. I just hope I can handle the task.

    2000 Gary Fisher Aquila. Genesis Geometry. I have a whopping $41 in it. Bought it off EBay. My first real MTB was a 98 Aquila. I sold it in 2000 and wondered why I did ever since. The 98 was a steel bike. This one's Aluminum. This is going to be fun!
    I had a 98 Aquila too! Awesome bike, still have the frame.

  3. #3
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    Great deal for $40.
    It will look real nice SS'ed.
    I like that blue colour too.

  4. #4
    Sofa King We Todd Did
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    Well chuffed for you, mate. For 40 bucks, that frame is a bloody steal. Wish I'd have been the one who'd picked that up!

  5. #5
    Enjoying Every Sandwich
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    I brought it in to work today and weighed it on one of our digital scales. She weighed in at 4.4 pounds. I wonder what my chances are of building her up to weigh at or less than 15 lbs, hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......Planning on putting a rigid fork to start out with. I think I like my chances. Thoughts?

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    O.c.

    Looks like she'll be great for the Ouachita Challenge! Are you making her into a SS?

  7. #7
    giddy up!
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    I brought it in to work today and weighed it on one of our digital scales. She weighed in at 4.4 pounds. I wonder what my chances are of building her up to weigh at or less than 15 lbs, hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......Planning on putting a rigid fork to start out with. I think I like my chances. Thoughts?
    That'll be pretty tough to do, or impossible. Check out the SS section on light-bikes.com to see some super light singles and what it took to get them there..

    B
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  8. #8
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    i saw

    a fifteen pound singlespeed in pennsylvania at the ECNaSSCU race put on by Mount Nittany Wheelworks:
    carbon bars, carbon seatpost, Ti fork, semi-slick tires, extra-lite tubes, radial lace wheels with alloy nipples, Ti pedals.. the whole nine yards including ti and al bolt kits...

    you ought to be able to get down under 20 fairly easily with careful component selection, but anything under 18 is gonna be tough/not cheap.

    good luck!
    Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go. (O. Wilde)

  9. #9
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    Looks Beautiful

    I hate to be the one to say it but...........are you sure it has no cracks??

  10. #10
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    15 Lb SS

    Quote Originally Posted by wonko_the_chain
    a fifteen pound singlespeed in pennsylvania at the ECNaSSCU race put on by Mount Nittany Wheelworks:
    carbon bars, carbon seatpost, Ti fork, semi-slick tires, extra-lite tubes, radial lace wheels with alloy nipples, Ti pedals.. the whole nine yards including ti and al bolt kits...

    you ought to be able to get down under 20 fairly easily with careful component selection, but anything under 18 is gonna be tough/not cheap.

    good luck!
    That was a Motobecane Fly. I think the frame is sub 3 lbs.
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  11. #11
    Cold. Blue. Steel.
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    sub 15? no chance.

    great find on a cool frame; but you are already at least 1.4 lbs. behind in your quest to get sub 15 lbs. all the bikes i have seen that are under 18 pounds start with a frame that weighs around 3 pounds (or even less these days), make sacrifices in ride quality (like rigid forks, tiny kenda tires and saddles with no padding) and most of all... they lighten their wallets up beyond belief. every pound of weight that your bike loses costs more than the previous pound.
    and i personally don't want to sacrifice ride quality (or deal with numb hands and fingers) for weight alone. plus, if you are riding a super light, rigid bike, downhilling can be a real handful. downright scary depending on where you live.
    i think trying to get under 20lb is a great compromise and if you can get close to 18 lbs, then you have really succeeded in your quest for super light! when was the last time you rode a 20 lbs or less mtb? you cannot believe how light it is! the thing is, riding off road puts stability at a premium, and i believe there is such a thing as too light.
    thanks for reading!
    Spinning and Grinning...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panacea
    I hate to be the one to say it but...........are you sure it has no cracks??
    Positive unless there is one that cannot be seen by the naked eye which is the case in any frame out there I would assume. The guy I bought it from claimed the frame had only been ridden for two years during the Spring and Fall. However take that with a grain of salt since this was an Ebay purchase. He took most of the components off to build up a Big Sur frame.

    So it looks like 15 pounds or less is out of the question on my budget, I guess I will shoot for a sub 20 lb build up.

    Thanks for the input. I'll be bugging you guys big time after the first of the year when I start the build, if I can't find what I am looking for in the FAQ Section.


  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    ...I guess I will shoot for a sub 20 lb build up.
    Absofrigginlutely possible. For what it's worth, the bike I just built up comes in at around 21lbs, I think. This is with a rigid fork (light, but not that light), but it's also got heavy saddle on it, heavy crap wheels, and heavy crap stem. I got some help by using an Easton EA70 flat bar, a Deore hollow crankset, and Eggbeaters. If I really want to put some pennies towards this ride, a sub-20lb setup is totally doable.

  14. #14
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    I did nearly the same thing to build a college commuter. I got a 98 gf big sur frame from the bay for 81 shipped and sold the front der. that came with it for 10. I bought the manitou mars 1 for 68 shipped and most of the other parts were inherited from my other bike. I'm now looking to build my own wheels for it. Have fun with it.

    And if your frame uses the same genesis geometry then a 36-18 combo will fit, it'll be on the tight side, but it'll work.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wonko_the_chain
    a fifteen pound singlespeed in pennsylvania at the ECNaSSCU race put on by Mount Nittany Wheelworks:
    carbon bars, carbon seatpost, Ti fork, semi-slick tires, extra-lite tubes, radial lace wheels with alloy nipples, Ti pedals.. the whole nine yards including ti and al bolt kits...

    you ought to be able to get down under 20 fairly easily with careful component selection, but anything under 18 is gonna be tough/not cheap.

    good luck!

    How can you radial lace a rear hub on a SS ?

  16. #16
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    Holy bar drop Batman!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by novice
    I did nearly the same thing to build a college commuter. I got a 98 gf big sur frame from the bay for 81 shipped and sold the front der. that came with it for 10. I bought the manitou mars 1 for 68 shipped and most of the other parts were inherited from my other bike. I'm now looking to build my own wheels for it. Have fun with it.

    And if your frame uses the same genesis geometry then a 36-18 combo will fit, it'll be on the tight side, but it'll work.
    Good luck on the Aquila. You will get some great info from these guys as you do your build. Also look up Spinwheelz's thread on his build. It is like a narrative on how to convert an old gearie to SS. And now,

    Sorry for the Hijack..........

    Hey novice, that is a really nice looking bike, but wow, how much bar drop are you running there. You could put some aero bars and ride that thing in roadie time trials with all of that drop. Does it effect the way you ride? Can you still pop up the front end and bunny hop with that it set up that way?

    Back to your regularly scheduled thread.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frozenspokes
    Hey novice, that is a really nice looking bike, but wow, how much bar drop are you running there. You could put some aero bars and ride that thing in roadie time trials with all of that drop. Does it effect the way you ride? Can you still pop up the front end and bunny hop with that it set up that way?

    Back to your regularly scheduled thread.
    I don't have the bike in front of me, but I think it has about 3 inches of drop. I think the angle of the picture makes the drop look larger than it is. Or maybe it's just more drop then most people use. The drop is about a half inch less than on my road bike, and I like the way it feels; I commute a few miles on it just about everyday.

    And I can bunny hop and pop up the front wheel, but I have to be off the saddle.

  18. #18
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    Developmental stages slowly coming along.......

    Got my seatpost and seat put on today.....Nashbar must sell these tacky Camo saddles for $1 per pound. Cost was $4.95 and shes a tad heavy. Nevertheless.....

    I have a headset on order. One of the Cane Creek S1s. My question is will the headset cups be included? Notice the second pic, there are no headset cups on my frame. MeanTodd emailed me today and said my 1x1 fork will ship out tomorrow. Says they ran out of them yesterday. Typical bad luck on my part.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    My question is will the headset cups be included?
    I especially like the rubber band providing tension on the top tube and down tube. ;-)

    A suggestion, if you aren't sure whether or not the head set cups are included, you might want to consider letting someone else build up the bike for you. ** feeling snotting today**

    Have fun with your build! You'll love SSing.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    So it looks like 15 pounds or less is out of the question on my budget, I guess I will shoot for a sub 20 lb build up.

    My butted 4130 extremely low-end Peugeot weighs 23.5lbs built with only the crappiest parts available, so 20lbs for that should be very easy. I think just having a 4.4lbs frame alone would get my bike close to 20lbs.
    bike dude, velocity employee (this is my personal account)

  21. #21
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    Ebay Auction where I bought the frame.....

    I'll be the FIRST to admit, I am bailing into this project head first. No wrenching experience at all besides your usual flats changed, brake cables fixed, etc. I am going to rely on you guys HEAVILY. I've got a new workstand, repair manual and small toolkit. Truly, I am headed out into the great wide open here. So you may see the occasional, or not so occasional stupid question from me. Sorry.

    Here's what threw me off on the Headset cups. Follow the link and read the last part of the description. Plus factor in that I have never installed a headset before.
    Last edited by TheBUNKY; 12-29-2004 at 05:34 PM.

  22. #22
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    Keep the questions comin'; will be here to lend a hand.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    I'll be the FIRST to admit, I am bailing into this project head first. No wrenching experience at all besides your usual flats changed, brake cables fixed, etc. I am going to rely on you guys HEAVILY. I've got a new workstand, repair manual and toolkit plus a decent amount of cash to spend on this thing. Truly, I am headed out into the great wide open here. So you may see the occasional stupid question from me. Sorry.
    I'm just giving you a hard time. You're being a good sport about it.

    Yes, your new headset will come with the cups. If you aren't going to fork up the dough for a real head set press, here is a link to a site that discusses making a homemade version: http://www.mindspring.com/~d.g1/headset.html.

    I tried it with the homemade version and promptly asked for the expensive Park tool last Christmas.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Ebay Auction where I bought the frame.....

    I'll be the FIRST to admit, I am bailing into this project head first. No wrenching experience at all besides your usual flats changed, brake cables fixed, etc. I am going to rely on you guys HEAVILY. I've got a new workstand, repair manual and small toolkit. Truly, I am headed out into the great wide open here. So you may see the occasional, or not so occasional stupid question from me. Sorry.

    Here's what threw me off on the Headset cups. Follow the link and read the last part of the description. Plus factor in that I have never installed a headset before.
    i don't know if anyone else has suggested this yet but a must-have for the new home wrench (not to be confused with the home wench ) is the book Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance. it's a fantastic resource and tells you everything you ever wanted to know about doing it yourself. mine actually falls open to certain pages and is complete with greasy fingerprints.

    good luck with the build. you will never love a bike as much as one you build yourself.

    rt
    "where are you not going so fast?" (question asked to cyclist on a trainer)

    *rt*'s fabulous blog
    mm blogging

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by *rt*
    i don't know if anyone else has suggested this yet but a must-have for the new home wrench (not to be confused with the home wench ) is the book Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance. it's a fantastic resource and tells you everything you ever wanted to know about doing it yourself. mine actually falls open to certain pages and is complete with greasy fingerprints.

    good luck with the build. you will never love a bike as much as one you build yourself.

    rt
    I received the Complete Guide to Bicycle Repair and Maintenance by Bicycling Magazine for Xmas and it has been a little helpful, but not much. I was thinking of buying that Zinn book too.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    I received the Complete Guide to Bicycle Repair and Maintenance by Bicycling Magazine for Xmas and it has been a little helpful, but not much. I was thinking of buying that Zinn book too.
    buy the Zinn book. you'll love it. he doesn't do much ss specific stuff (or at least not in the version i have from '98) but he covers all the basics in a way that is thorough & comprehensible. for the ss specific stuff you can just come back here.

    rt - asked a lot of stupid questions while learning.....h3ll, i still ask a lot of stupid questions!
    "where are you not going so fast?" (question asked to cyclist on a trainer)

    *rt*'s fabulous blog
    mm blogging

  27. #27
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    Another great (and free) resource

    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQindex.shtml
    Scroll down to "bike repair map".

    Quote Originally Posted by *rt*
    buy the Zinn book. you'll love it. he doesn't do much ss specific stuff (or at least not in the version i have from '98) but he covers all the basics in a way that is thorough & comprehensible. for the ss specific stuff you can just come back here.

    rt - asked a lot of stupid questions while learning.....h3ll, i still ask a lot of stupid questions!
    keep moving

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Got my seatpost and seat put on today.....Nashbar must sell these tacky Camo saddles for $1 per pound. Cost was $4.95 and shes a tad heavy. Nevertheless.....

    I have a headset on order. One of the Cane Creek S1s. My question is will the headset cups be included? Notice the second pic, there are no headset cups on my frame. MeanTodd emailed me today and said my 1x1 fork will ship out tomorrow. Says they ran out of them yesterday. Typical bad luck on my part.
    aww That stuff is waayyyy heavy. Especially that nasty saddle =P. Ask about individual parts too cause that loooks like it's headed into 20+ lbs

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by b12yan88
    aww That stuff is waayyyy heavy. Especially that nasty saddle =P. Ask about individual parts too cause that loooks like it's headed into 20+ lbs

    Not really sweatin' the saddle weight. I'll have a new one put on after the build is done. This one was bought because a) it was cheap and b) its tacky.

    Got the Headset, Stem and Carbon bars today. Went with the Weyless CFX2 bars from Supergo. They are wide and light.

    Got a Race Face System Stem, but it's a tad long for me at 140 mm. Once the fork arrives next week and I get it assembled with some help from a buddy, I'll post more pics. Hopefully all this will be done by next weekend. Then I can start shopping for a cheap wheelset.

    I am thinking of going ahead and buying the cranks a bottom bracket too sometime this weekend. Leaning heavily towards the Truvativ Stylo SS cranks and Truvativ ISIS FireX BB.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Not really sweatin' the saddle weight. I'll have a new one put on after the build is done. This one was bought because a) it was cheap and b) its tacky.

    Got the Headset, Stem and Carbon bars today. Went with the Weyless CFX2 bars from Supergo. They are wide and light.

    Got a Race Face System Stem, but it's a tad long for me at 140 mm. Once the fork arrives next week and I get it assembled with some help from a buddy, I'll post more pics. Hopefully all this will be done by next weekend. Then I can start shopping for a cheap wheelset.

    I am thinking of going ahead and buying the cranks a bottom bracket too sometime this weekend. Leaning heavily towards the Truvativ Stylo SS cranks and Truvativ ISIS FireX BB.
    Check out this wheel set i just found. It's ccheap off ebay and they are new. not too heavy for the price. I have a feeling that it should be lighter than 1820, almost positive it should be. The SOB front hub which i have is onlly 121 grams. those rims are light and they used 1.8 spokes. I used a 14/15/14 gauge with similar weight rims with brass nipples, I used a 283 gram rear hub and got it to 1600. This looks like it should be lighter, but im not too sure.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...124223300&rd=1

  31. #31
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    Well the most difficult part of the build should begin tonight....

    according to the tracking page on UPS.com, my Surly 1x1 should be on my doorstep when I arrive home from work.

    Any pointers on the fork install? I have the headset cups "pressed" into my head tube now. The part I am dreading is cutting the fork to the proper length. I have bought the Zinn book as well within the past week. I have the instructions from Cane Creek for the install too.

    Anyone have any advice? Should I drink three or four Fat Tire or other New Belgium brews before beginning this task
    Last edited by TheBUNKY; 01-06-2005 at 12:57 PM.

  32. #32
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    What's to dread about cutting the steerer tube on your fork? Measure a couple of times, mark the cut-off point, tighen a pipe cutter around the tube and start turning. Piece of cake. If you're not confident of the length, leave more tube on - you can always cut more off later. Or simply stack spacers on top of your stem.

    I got a new fork for X'mas and I got the install done in about 30 minutes flat.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpinWheelz
    What's to dread about cutting the steerer tube on your fork? Measure a couple of times, mark the cut-off point, tighen a pipe cutter around the tube and start turning. Piece of cake. If you're not confident of the length, leave more tube on - you can always cut more off later. Or simply stack spacers on top of your stem.

    I got a new fork for X'mas and I got the install done in about 30 minutes flat.
    Spin, what was the most difficult part of your build that you remember?

  34. #34
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    Chainline was the trickiest. I didn't have the luxury of picking a bottom bracket with the correct spindle length (I think a SS standard is 113mm?). I used what came with the bike and that threw everything off. I tried using spacers on my freewheel (which was a no-no 'cause I ended up stripping the threads on the freehub), and I ended making my own chainring spacers with filed down washers I got from Home Depot.

  35. #35
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    Fork's installed!

    Big Brown truck showed up after I was home from work. Here's a few scenes from what I have been doing tonight......

    As you can tell from the last pic, I will be making a trip to the LBS tomorrow to get a few additional spacers for my stem. I cut it off about 1/8 inch longer than I should.
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  36. #36
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    Couple more.....

    Pay no attention to that cassette, this is the wheelset from my geared Trek.
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  37. #37
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    Bought a wheelset and Singulator today at the LBS....Not sure if I'll need the Singulator or not, I bought it just in case. Since I have vertical dropouts and a QR on the rear wheel, I will probably need it.

    SunRingle/Deore Wheelset (Remember I'm on a budget) and a Singulator. All that is left are BB, Cranks, Rear Cog, Brakes, Grips, Chain, Tubes and Tires!

    Anyone bought one of those Gusset 1'er Single Speed Conversion kits from WebCyclery?
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    Last edited by TheBUNKY; 01-11-2005 at 05:49 PM.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    All that is left are BB, Cranks, Rear Cog, Brakes, Grips, Chain, Tubes and Tires!
    that is hillarious- you are a true optimist when you say "all that is left." that is quite a list and $$ to boot. plus, don't forget to add a "real saddle" to you list!

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Anyone bought one of those Gusset 1'er Single Speed Conversion kits from WebCyclery?
    i have one and they are the best. plus, they look so clean.
    Spinning and Grinning...

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    You need to find more parts in your friend "left overs" parts bins

    And I second the saddle suggestion...could you have found and uglier one?

    Sorry if that offended you.

    Shane

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneGearGuy
    that is hillarious- you are a true optimist when you say "all that is left." that is quite a list and $$ to boot. plus, don't forget to add a "real saddle" to you list!

    i have one and they are the best. plus, they look so clean.

    Yeah, my budget was way off.

    Interesting tidbit I found at my LBS yesterday. I had them price a set of Truvativ Stylo SS Cranks for me. Their cost was a lot more than Webcyclery's selling price of $95. Cranks and ISIS Bottom Bracket are the most expensive things left. The seat will come off my geared bike when I upgrade the saddle on that steed. Brakes are going to be the Performance Forte Team variety. I've read where those are fairly light weight and cheap. $40 for a set. The SS Conversion Kit is around $30, last time I checked.

    Probably won't sink any more money into this thing for another month or so, although that will probably kill me since I want to get this thing done.

    Skullman, You aren't going to offend me. Thats one of the main reasons why I bought that saddle. It's tacky as Hell and it was $5 from Nashbar.

    Later.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Anyone bought one of those Gusset 1'er Single Speed Conversion kits from WebCyclery?
    I tried ordering one from them and they are out of stock. I ordered from here jensonusa.com

    BTW, nice build up. I'm doing something very similar to a 2001 Tassajara.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Planning on building it up this Winter after the holidays. I just hope I can handle the task.
    !
    You know it's not really going to be winter for very much longer here in Fayetteville. Weird weather though, eh?

    -TS
    Fayetteville, AR and N.W.A RePrEsEnT

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    Update!

    Whelp, got my Gusset Conversion kit, brakes, grips, and BB installed today. Here are some pics. All that is left are Cranks and Pedals!!!! Can't wait. I probably need to take it in to the LBS before I take an epic ride. I have just a smidge of play in the headtube. Not sure if my star nut is stripped or what. No matter how long I turn the top screw it will not snug up or tighten.

    Anyway, I took some close ups of the Gusset conversion kit since I didn't see any on the site and I was curious before I bought this one. Maybe somebody out there is thinking of buying one and wants to see some pix. If so, here you go.
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  44. #44
    Shreddin the Cul de Sac
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    headset play

    Any chance you don't have enough spacers between the top of the stem and the steerer cap?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    I have just a smidge of play in the headtube. Not sure if my star nut is stripped or what. No matter how long I turn the top screw it will not snug up or tighten.
    keep moving

  45. #45
    Enjoying Every Sandwich
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burpee
    Any chance you don't have enough spacers between the top of the stem and the steerer cap?
    Worst fear has happened, my SFN (Star Fangled Nut) is actually moving inside the steerer tube of my fork when I turn the top bolt with an allen wrench. Needless to say, I cannot loosen or tighten it. Now what. I need to figure out a way to loosen it and more than likely, replace the SFN. How in the world am I going to do this? Any suggestions? Don't really want to take it to the LBS.

    I wonder if I need to set the new SFN with some lock-tite adhesive to avoid this happening again.

    Anyone ever have this happen??
    Last edited by TheBUNKY; 01-29-2005 at 10:42 AM.

  46. #46
    I like Squishy Bikes
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    Nuts

    Your LBS should have extra nuts...cheap too.
    Or go with a Head Lock type of topcap.
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    A dirty book is rarely dusty

  47. #47
    Shreddin the Cul de Sac
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    What he said

    If that star nut is cooked, just pound it down the steerer out of the way and get a new one.
    5 bucks or so at the bike shop. Next time remember the spacers, If you overtightened the starnut and pulled it up, it was most likely due to lack of spacers between the stem and top cap.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    Worst fear has happened, my SFN (Star Fangled Nut) is actually moving inside the steerer tube of my fork when I turn the top bolt with an allen wrench. Needless to say, I cannot loosen or tighten it. Now what. I need to figure out a way to loosen it and more than likely, replace the SFN. How in the world am I going to do this? Any suggestions? Don't really want to take it to the LBS.

    I wonder if I need to set the new SFN with some lock-tite adhesive to avoid this happening again.

    Anyone ever have this happen??
    keep moving

  48. #48
    Where's Toto?
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    Judging from the looks of it, you didn't have enough spacers on the fork. When you tightened down on the top bolt, you weren't snugging the headset stack, you were pulling the SFN out. When it's all said and done, spacers + stem should be about 1/8" above the top of the fork. This will allow the SNF to snug the headset and eliminate the play you described.

  49. #49
    Enjoying Every Sandwich
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    Quote Originally Posted by endure26
    Judging from the looks of it, you didn't have enough spacers on the fork. When you tightened down on the top bolt, you weren't snugging the headset stack, you were pulling the SFN out. When it's all said and done, spacers + stem should be about 1/8" above the top of the fork. This will allow the SNF to snug the headset and eliminate the play you described.
    If you compare pictures between post 36 and 43 you will see that I didn't have enough spacers when I initially installed the Headset, Stem and Fork. I probably did tighten it too much without that extra spacer. In post 43, the last picture, you can see that I put another spacer on the top the of the stem in the stack. That was probably when I stripped it.

    I'll head to Home Depot today to get a dowel and hopefully bang out the SFN. I am going to take off the front wheel and stem, then see if I can bang out the SFN from the bottom up since I can't get the top bolt out. No matter which way I turn the top bolt, it spins the SFN and won't stop.

  50. #50
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    Don't spend money on a dowel

    Will the bolt come out of the star nut at all? Maybe you can stick something skinny down in between the "fingers" of the starnut to keep it from spinning while you unthread the bolt.

    Just use a long screwdriver, bolt, or something you have hanging around to bang down the star nut. You don't have to knock it all the way out, just far enough beyond the reach of the top cap bolt and new star nut, right? A couple inches or so.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBUNKY
    If you compare pictures between post 36 and 43 you will see that I didn't have enough spacers when I initially installed the Headset, Stem and Fork. I probably did tighten it too much without that extra spacer. In post 43, the last picture, you can see that I put another spacer on the top the of the stem in the stack. That was probably when I stripped it.

    I'll head to Home Depot today to get a dowel and hopefully bang out the SFN. I am going to take off the front wheel and stem, then see if I can bang out the SFN from the bottom up since I can't get the top bolt out. No matter which way I turn the top bolt, it spins the SFN and won't stop.
    keep moving

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burpee
    Will the bolt come out of the star nut at all? Maybe you can stick something skinny down in between the "fingers" of the starnut to keep it from spinning while you unthread the bolt.

    Just use a long screwdriver, bolt, or something you have hanging around to bang down the star nut. You don't have to knock it all the way out, just far enough beyond the reach of the top cap bolt and new star nut, right? A couple inches or so.

    The dowel was only $2 at Home Depot. No biggie. I didn't have anything long enough to run up the headtube/steerer tube from the underside.

    What I did today, I inverted the bike in my workstand after taking off the front wheel, stem, bars and brake cables. Then I inserted the dowel from the underside of the fork. With a slight tap at the end of the dowel with my rubber mallet, the top cap, top bolt and SFN was out! The spacer that was on top of the stem also came free. I picked up the top cap and the SFN was actually resting against the underside. The SFN's bottom star, if you will, will spin freely. Therefore while I was trying to tighten or loosen it, the bottom star was the on that was spinning not allowing me to tighten or loosen the top bolt.

    Tomorrow's task; a trip to the LBS for a new SFN. I will probably take the fork and let them seat the SFN for me. Tomorow night, I will reassemble everything and hopefully have no play.

    Getting ready now to order my cranks. Hopefully by the end of the week or next weekend, the bike will be complete and I will be able to take it out for a spin. Stay tuned guys, this build is nearly complete! I really should have made this thread into a blog somewhere. I have learned so much from doing this, hopefully some of you new guys have learned a thing or two as well from the other seasoned SSers that have helped me with my build.

    More to come.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by novice
    I did nearly the same thing to build a college commuter. I got a 98 gf big sur frame from the bay for 81 shipped and sold the front der. that came with it for 10. I bought the manitou mars 1 for 68 shipped and most of the other parts were inherited from my other bike. I'm now looking to build my own wheels for it. Have fun with it.

    And if your frame uses the same genesis geometry then a 36-18 combo will fit, it'll be on the tight side, but it'll work.
    Yep, 36-18 worked on my GF also!
    Saving the world one calorie at a time.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by cautiouschris
    Yep, 36-18 worked on my GF also!

    I am going to go with 33 18.

    Truvativ Stylo SS Cranks and the 18t Cog that came with my Gusset 1er Conversion kit.

    My cranks should be sitting on my doorstep when I get home from work. I am going to get those installed tonight and see how that goes. I don't think I'll need the tensioner, so I may ebay it.

    If I am thinking right on this, the only thing I will need the tensioner for is to eliminate any rear skewer slippage. I have a SRAM chain that I can cut down to the length I need. Its brand new from the LBS. I dunno, maybe I am dead wrong on this. Is it that easy? Take out the links you don't need, then fasten the chain together?

  54. #54
    Sofa King We Todd Did
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    Unless you find that 'magic gear' which in this case suggests 36/18, that chain might either be too short or two long. A half-link is an option though from my previous queries, not a very favorable one.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpinWheelz
    Unless you find that 'magic gear' which in this case suggests 36/18, that chain might either be too short or two long. A half-link is an option though from my previous queries, not a very favorable one.
    Came home for lunch and installed my cranks. Preliminary measurements suggest that the chain I have might be off a link. I say that meaning when I measure it the end of the chain meets the matching link. Not the odd link that it needs to fit together. That is with and without the Singulator.

    Tonight after I get home from work I am going to try the 16t cog and see if it is any closer.

    We will see how the 33 16 fits. If it still doesn't fit correctly, I may take it to the LBS tomorrow and have them put it on. I hate to chicken out like that, but I really want to ride this weekend since the temps are supposed to be in the 60s here.

  56. #56
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    It's ALIVE, It's ALIVE!!!!

    COMPLETE and FINISHED!!!! Just put on the chain and tensioned it with the Singulator. Going with the Thirty-Three Sixteen ratio. It helps when you buy a SS specific chain

    Thanks a ton you guys for all your help. I could not have done this without you. Thanks to SpinWheelz whose thread on his build inspired me to do this.

    Thanks to JensonUSA, WebCyclery, Nashbar, Performance, Supergo and my LBS Champion Cycling for the necessary parts needed for the build.

    I have learned so much in doing this. Now I am not afraid to take on such a task. Hope you enjoy the pics. Maybe this weekend, I'll get some action shots of her.

    Here are a couple of the complete build.
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