Is my SS too heavy?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Is my SS too heavy?

    I've got a Vassago with rigid fork. I've recently started riding it SS. I just weighed it and (including fenders and Garmin) it weighs 26.05 lbs. I would love to have a lighter bike, but I'm just not sure it's possible without throwing a lot of money at it.

    I was thinking about getting a Brooks Team Pro, but that would add close to 300 grams to the bike.

    I like the way it rides. Should I just shut up and keep riding it?

  2. #2
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    its not too heavy, just ride it

  3. #3
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    Not too heavy. That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    I've got a Vassago with rigid fork. I've recently started riding it SS. I just weighed it and (including fenders and Garmin) it weighs 26.05 lbs. I would love to have a lighter bike, but I'm just not sure it's possible without throwing a lot of money at it.

    I was thinking about getting a Brooks Team Pro, but that would add close to 300 grams to the bike.

    I like the way it rides. Should I just shut up and keep riding it?
    most people weigh their bikes bare, meaning no fenders, no bottle cages, no gps or hrm.

  5. #5
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    too light is relative. I've weighed my Fe2+ with dirt and a seat bag on it and been under 24#. You could weigh it without cages, hrm, or whatever, but then some joker will weigh his without grease or paint or tires just to claim some dopey number which has no basis in the real world. If your bike comes off the car ready to hit the trail at 26# then I'd be happy. Especially if it has reliable parts for a 26# bike.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  6. #6
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    WAY TO HEAVY!! For a SS with a rigid fork, unless you have a small television with a satelite dish on it 26.anything is a pig sorry but i have a fox vanilla with sun singletrac rims, an eccentric rear hub (disc) and moto raptor 2.4 on the front (bullit proof and heavy) and im in just over 25Lb. Than again a ridin buddy I know has a SS that is over 36 Lbs. Sooo I guess as long as you like the ride who gives a **** unless of course your in a contest in that case loose the garmin and fenders,grease, paint, tubes and skid on pavement alot to wear down your treads! HA HA. Just Go Ride

  7. #7
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    Its only heavy if you think it is. I ride with blokes that ride DH bikes and they smoke most blokes up hills. I've never weighed 1 of my bikes. Is it cheaper for you to loose 5lbs or the bike to loose 5lbs? I know which one would be more beneficial to riding.... and it aint the bike.

  8. #8
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    Well, you could spend a grand or so and lose 3 pounds or cut out the occasional beer and french fry binge and lose 3 pounds. Unless your bike is so freakin' heavy that you can't bear to ride it it's not too heavy.
    Also, the streets are full of horizontal dropouts...

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  9. #9
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    That's not heavy for a 29er imho, considering the fenders and the garmin, and especially if it's one of the larger size frames.

    If you haven't already, switching to a ti seatpost (used) and a carbon hbar, lighter tires and a ghetto tubeless setup, could drop almost a pound from the bike without throwing too much money at it (but I know that's subjective).

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dblspeed
    If you haven't already, switching to a ti seatpost (used) and a carbon hbar, lighter tires and a ghetto tubeless setup, could drop almost a pound from the bike without throwing too much money at it (but I know that's subjective).
    Just tires and NoTubes could drop a pound depending on what tires you have, but 26#'s isn't bad...especially for a "wet cat".

  11. #11
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    dude, its FINE! 26 lbs is a fine weight indeed.

  12. #12
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    i have two. one, an aluminum framed, 80mm front suspended 29er with disks weighs 26ish; the other, a steel framed rigid 29er with rim brakes currently weighs 27ish, but is probably about to come closer to 29-30 when i mount up the 26 x 3" tires to wide rims and put em on there for snow use..

  13. #13
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    Do these pants make me look fat?

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  14. #14
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    There are a bunch of 26" rigid forked SS bikes in the 24-26lb range. I think the out-of the-box Bianchi's fall into the 23-26lb range depending on the frame size and material. I recently looked at buying a 26" Surley SS w/rigid fork and it had to be every bit of 27-28 lbs. Although on the heavy side, those Surleys get great reviews and the owners seem to feel that weight is insignificant when compared to overall performance and durability.

    Considering those 26" SS observations, I would think your 29" Vassago without the fenders and Garmin is probably in the mid 25lb range, which should be a pretty decent mid-range weight and there are always ways to reduce bike weight. The core frame/fork weight will always end-up determining the potential, but I would guess the Vassago could be built into a 24lb ride with no problems (other than funding your project).

    At the end of the day it sounds like you should feel good about what you have with the Vassago, and I think whatever you get used to riding (weight-wise) your performance and strength will level-out against that bike weight sooner or later.

    Enjoy your Vassago, I understand they are excellent bikes!!

  15. #15
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    I don't think that sounds too bad at all. Unless you ride an XS and weigh in around 130 lbs or so... My bike weighs a bit more than that and it works fine. As parts wear, I may get some lighter, nicer higher-end to replace it, but as it sits right now, I don't have to worry about the bike, and I still need to lose another 10 pounds myself! While I would probably notice some lighter wheels, and appreciate the comfort of a set of CF handlebars on my rigid ride, it may be a while before it happens. With fenders and GPS 26 lbs sounds pretty average to me - go see how much dirt you can stick to it!
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  16. #16
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    That is heavy. Whether it is too heavy, only you can decide.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    That is heavy. Whether it is too heavy, only you can decide.
    heavy? compared to what? a roadbike? only non man boob toting lycra-bibed roadies would consider 26 lbs heavy

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    heavy? compared to what? a roadbike? only non man boob toting lycra-bibed roadies would consider 26 lbs heavy
    Its heavy compared to other SS bikes. A geared HT 29er with front shock is 26 lbs and he doesn't have gears or a front shock. A rigid SS bike should be very low 20's without trying to hard.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1-bar
    Its heavy compared to other SS bikes. A geared HT 29er with front shock is 26 lbs and he doesn't have gears or a front shock. A rigid SS bike should be very low 20's without trying to hard.
    huh? do you have a clue as to how much stock (off the shelf) 29er fully rigid bikes weigh? At or above 27 lbs....so yeah, ANY bike can be really light if you have the coin.

    a geard 29er HT with sus fork does NOT weigh 26 lbs without putting some money into it. becuz one wastes money on X0 carbon parts and other nonsense does NOT make it the only way to go

  20. #20
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    my SS is 31 pounds so don't worry your doing just fine.

  21. #21
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    For a little bit of money, you could get it a little bit lighter, but you might not even notice a little bit lighter. So, don't worry about it. Ride and be happy.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  22. #22
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    weight weenie!

    whatever you manage to get up a hill with your own power will only strengthen you.

  23. #23
    You know, for kids
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    my rigid SS Vassago weighs in at near 28lbs, due to mainly heavy duty hardware


    just ride your bike
    disclaimer: I sell and repair bicycles

  24. #24
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    Too heavy? Don't be ridiculous. There's at least two people I can think of who race crits on a singlespeeds which weigh over 16kg (35lbs). The SS I've built up is over 11kg (26lbs) - somewhere around the 11.8 region.

  25. #25
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    Stickin' up fo' Fo

    Well said, Fo.

    My rigid 29er SS weighs more than 26 lbs -- I haven't weighed it, I just know it does. Probably a lot more. I don't care.

    I'm 6'3" and I like riding a bike I know won't break underneath me, outfitted with parts that won't break. I've already broken enough bike stuff. I like my bike the way it is.

    Does your bike work? Stop looking at the scale or other peoples bikes and enjoy yours. On the other hand, if YOU think it's too heavy, go ahead and pull out your wallet.

    --Sparty

    P.S. It's easier for someone under 5'7" to build a really light bike. Especially if they don't hammer their equipment. Even moreso if they have an unlimited budget.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Well said, Fo.

    My rigid 29er SS weighs more than 26 lbs -- I haven't weighed it, I just know it does. Probably a lot more. I don't care.

    I'm 6'3" and I like riding a bike I know won't break underneath me, outfitted with parts that won't break. I've already broken enough bike stuff. I like my bike the way it is.

    Does your bike work? Stop looking at the scale or other peoples bikes and enjoy yours. On the other hand, if YOU think it's too heavy, go ahead and pull out your wallet.

    --Sparty

    P.S. It's easier for someone under 5'7" to build a really light bike. Especially if they don't hammer their equipment. Even moreso if they have an unlimited budget.
    and ditto to you...well said. MTBR generalizations do more harm than good as far as I am concerned. While I should then not say 26 lbs is light or heavy, nor should anybody else. We all ride different terrain, have different weights, and have different skill levels which take us on more (or less) aggro terrain than others where "light" becomes SUCH a relative terms where for one person at the same weight it may be fine and for others, riding in more GNAR terrain with more skill level (ie, more speed in techy sections) that supposed light weight is a complete joke to even consider.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    heavy? compared to what? a roadbike? only non man boob toting lycra-bibed roadies would consider 26 lbs heavy
    I would consider any rigid singlespeed meant for XC riding to be gratuitously heavy if it weighed over 25#.

    True, 26# is "reasonable" among the trendy rigid/29er/SS bikes sold by the marginal companies that crawled out of the woodwork and unleashed a swarm of cheaply made, stingily spec'd complete bikes onto the market when nobody else was offering 29ers. But you would have to go out of your way to build a rigid SS at that weight without access to a catalog full of chintzy OEM components.

    My Karate Monkey weight 27 lbs., but that was with a Brooks Champion Flyer (850g+) and XT M756 hubs.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    I'm 6'3" and I like riding a bike I know won't break underneath me, outfitted with parts that won't break. I've already broken enough bike stuff. I like my bike the way it is.
    I am 6'3" too. What does height have to do with anything?

  29. #29
    You know, for kids
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus

    P.S. It's easier for someone under 5'7" to build a really light bike. Especially if they don't hammer their equipment. Even moreso if they have an unlimited budget.
    Exactly. I am 6'2" and 250lbs so I had to get the largest (heaviest) Vassago frame and loaded it up with beefy Profile hubs, Downhill cranks/BB/headset, and All Mountain stem and seatpost. I knew my bike was going to be heavy and near indestructible. I was happy that it turned out to be right under 28lbs. The only thing I've still got left to do to it is drop a little rotational weight by switching from 800g Rampages to 640g Racing Ralphs. I think it'll be perfect then.
    Last edited by madcap; 12-29-2007 at 10:30 PM.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by madcap
    Exactly. I am 6'2" and 250lbs so I had the get the largest (heaviest) Vassago frame and loaded it up with beefy Profile hubs, Downhill cranks/BB/headset, and All Mountain stem and seatpost. I knew my bike was going to be heavy and near indestructible. I was happy that it turned out to be right under 28lbs. The only thing I've still got left to do to it is drop a little rotational weight by switching from 800g Rampages to 640g Racing Ralphs. I think it'll be perfect then.
    Well, if your super-duty build is under 28lbs., doesn't that suggest that a standard build that comes in at 26lbs. is heavy?

  31. #31
    You know, for kids
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    Well, if your super-duty build is under 28lbs., doesn't that suggest that a standard build that comes in at 26lbs. is heavy?
    Not really, I didn't use super heavy parts or anything, just ones that are not quite as light as normal XC parts. I was still somewhat weight conscious. Overall, on the components, I'd say they only added about 400g, maybe 500g. So to me, a 26lb bike isn't heavy. It's lighter than mine would have been if I had chosen lighter XC components.

    I've seen people racing 35lb+ bikes. I'm happy if my builds are under 30
    disclaimer: I sell and repair bicycles

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    I am 6'3" too. What does height have to do with anything?
    You're joking, right?

    Why does a long bridge weigh more than a short one?

    Metal.

    Big bikes: longer frame tubes, handlebars, cranks, seatpost, etc. -- even little stuff like hoses, cables and housings. And since taller people generally weigh more than shorter people, more robust wheels, fatter tires, etc. Forget ti BB spindles, pedals, etc.

    I've built weight weenie bikes, before. You want light? Really light? EVERY component must go on the scale, right down to chainring bolts. Decisions between weight/performance are unavoidable.

    Can hardly believe you asked.

    --Sparty

    P.S. No, I don't use aluminum chainring bolts.
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  33. #33
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    I think you are drawing a false -- or maybe just euphemistic -- correlation being tall and being heavy. Coming out of 'cross season I weigh 160#, so even at 6'3" I don't feel the need to buy bike parts in the "husky" department.

    The slightly larger frame is another bogus rationale. A few extra inches of steel tubing isn't going to add pounds to a frame. And if the frame is bigger, you don't need a longer seatpost.

    Why is it so hard to just admit that a rigid SS bike that weighs more than some FS geared bikes might be heavier than it needs to be? As I stated to begin with, whether it is too heavy is a matter of opinion. But you can build a non-weenie bike that weighs much less than 26#.

  34. #34
    meh... whatever
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    he's trolling, sparty...

    (in addition to misusing "euphemistic")
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  35. #35
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    I think you guys are being a little silly about the weight thing - When I was 254lbs I could ride a ti-spindle on gnarly trails and lightweight rims... but I break handlebars, whimpy spokes, and bend cranks like crazy. Dunno how that works. 26lbs sounds pretty heavy for a 26" wheeled SS but the 29" wheels seem to weight quite a bit more - plus there's more seat and chainstay, more chain, etc.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    (in addition to misusing "euphemistic")
    Trust you to count tact as a misuse. If I knew you and "sparty" were such buddies I wouldn't have wasted my time posting a differing opinion.

    I bet any bike seems light compared to that chip on your shoulder.

  37. #37
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    My 20" Haro Mary 29er Rigid with a carbon fork and AC wheels weighs 23.1lbs with pedals, 22.6 without
    2008 Rig

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    I like the way it rides.
    There's a point you should not ignore

    What sort of tyres are you running? Replacing heavy tyres is a pretty cost-efficient way to lose weight on a bike, if they are heavy.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbo43867
    My 20" Haro Mary 29er Rigid with a carbon fork and AC wheels weighs 23.1lbs with pedals, 22.6 without
    wow, with pedals that is pretty heavy for a rigid bike. without pedals however, it is very light since it is under 23

  40. #40
    quickmik
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    You can get a SS under 22lbs with minimal expense. Use NOS or used parts from Ebay or LBS for about 200.00 bucks you can get a lot of light parts. Also look for thrown out crashed bikes sometimes they have light aluminum parts.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    I think you are drawing a false -- or maybe just euphemistic -- correlation being tall and being heavy. Coming out of 'cross season I weigh 160#, so even at 6'3" I don't feel the need to buy bike parts in the "husky" department.

    The slightly larger frame is another bogus rationale. A few extra inches of steel tubing isn't going to add pounds to a frame. And if the frame is bigger, you don't need a longer seatpost.

    Why is it so hard to just admit that a rigid SS bike that weighs more than some FS geared bikes might be heavier than it needs to be? As I stated to begin with, whether it is too heavy is a matter of opinion. But you can build a non-weenie bike that weighs much less than 26#.
    You know, PBB, it boils down to priorities. Whatever is important to each individual rider. I outweigh you by 35 lbs, not that it matters. But for God's sake, man, people tell me I'm thin. I imagine folks must constantly be trying to shove you into the nearest ambulance or at least talk you into anorexia counseling.

    Anyway it sounds like weight is an obsession of yours so that's cool -- you choose to apply that obsession to the bike, too. You've got that going for you and that's awesome. That's your priority.

    My point is: your experience is your experience. Mine is mine. If we don't look at it that way we'll just argue. I've busted lightweight stuff so I know what works and doesn't work for me. You run whatever you like. Please.

    --Sparty

    P.S. I never said you "can't build a non-weenie bike that weighs much less than 26#." I said it's much easier for someone who's smaller and lighter to build one. And when every gram counts, it is.

    Have a cheeseburger.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    wow, with pedals that is pretty heavy for a rigid bike. without pedals however, it is very light since it is under 23
    I have to admit, I got a good laugh out of that.

  43. #43
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    I have a SS Karate Monkey that weighs a bomb-proof 25lbs. I could have gotten some more expensive, lighter parts, some plastic parts (CF) and some low vol. tires and gotten it closer to 20 lbs, but as it is it's exceptionally more solid than a ~20lb build would have been. No worries of failures or breakages, just ride n' smile.
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  44. #44
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    Rideit!!!

    Until you find the $$$ for lighter tires and wheels; even it you can save a pound in the wheels and tires you'll feel it.
    Unless that frame is made of lead and you allready have light wheels and tires.

  45. #45
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    I think you are drawing a false -- or maybe just euphemistic -- correlation being tall and being heavy.
    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    ...misusing "euphemistic"
    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    Trust you to count tact as a misuse.
    perhaps you should look up the big words before you use them.

    "euphemistic" means to substitute a more benign or indirect expression for one generally thought to be repugnant or offensive, and that was not done. thus, one would not be euphemistic to correlate increased height with increased mass; but would, in fact, simply be drawing a conclusion based upon the general trend in human anatomy/physiology*.

    the radically atypical situation of being 6'3" and an anomalous, wispy 160 lbs brings to mind christian bale in "the machinist".


    *and thus would actually be a stereotypical, archtypical, conventional, basal, intrinsic, or even conventional conclusion.
    Last edited by monogod; 12-31-2007 at 01:33 AM.
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  46. #46
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    Wow, usually when I post I'm more of a thread closer.

    For what it's worth:
    • 16" Vassago and matching rigid fork.
    • Front wheel is Exiwolf on a Salsa Delgato disk rim and hope hub.
    • Rear is newly built Flow with Hope cassette hub (using spacers) and a Speccy Captain tire.
    • Custom BS ti post, Speccy saddle, Thomson stem, and Jones H-bar.
    • BB7 disk brakes and Ultimate levers.


    I rode it today up Mt. Diablo to the summit (all on the pavement) without stopping (12.5 miles and 3800 feet of climbing).

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeMojo
    Do these pants make me look fat?

    [email protected] you! That just reminded me of something that I spent six months working VERY hard to try to forget.....




    btw OP, yes, your bike is too heavy, you must buy the new Optimus Ti and have a custom Ti fork built to match. Then you must bling it out with as many Ti parts as you can, have MC build you up a set of uberlight wheels, run Kenda SB8s tubeless with half of the knobs removed, peel the cover off your seat, use tennis racquet tape instead of grips (they are too heavy), post a picture of it tied down to stop it blowing away in the breeze, swear it is the best bike you have ever ridden, then post it for sale in the classifieds precisely four days later. C'mon, hurry up, we're waiting!
    Ride.

  48. #48
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    Lol!

    Quote Originally Posted by TheSingleGuy
    [email protected] you! That just reminded me of something that I spent six months working VERY hard to try to forget.....




    btw OP, yes, your bike is too heavy, you must buy the new Optimus Ti and have a custom Ti fork built to match. Then you must bling it out with as many Ti parts as you can, have MC build you up a set of uberlight wheels, run Kenda SB8s tubeless with half of the knobs removed, peel the cover off your seat, use tennis racquet tape instead of grips (they are too heavy), post a picture of it tied down to stop it blowing away in the breeze, swear it is the best bike you have ever ridden, then post it for sale in the classifieds precisely four days later. C'mon, hurry up, we're waiting!
    LOL to alla that!

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  49. #49
    Recovering Weight Weenie
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    My first 29er SS weighed 29lbs rigid. I then raced multiple endurance events on it with a suspension fork, which put it at about 31lbs. I rode/raced that for almost 3 years. It was dependable and fun.

    Now that I'm wiser (<--sarcasm) I have another 29er SS which is weighing 23lbs. It is also dependable and fun. I tend to be "faster" on it though.

    Fat.


    Skinny.

  50. #50
    Peace & Love
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    My first 29er SS weighed 29lbs rigid. I then raced multiple endurance events on it with a suspension fork, which put it at about 31lbs. I rode/raced that for almost 3 years. It was dependable and fun.

    Now that I'm wiser (<--sarcasm) I have another 29er SS which is weighing 23lbs. It is also dependable and fun. I tend to be "faster" on it though.
    it was a sad day when Padre became a weight weenie...what is this world coming to?

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    Now that I'm wiser (<--sarcasm) I have another 29er SS which is weighing 23lbs. It is also dependable and fun. I tend to be "faster" on it though.

    Wow 23lbs? Those wheels (or at least rims) don't look light and they were pretty soft for me. That Fox looks nice. There must have been some magic in that...

  52. #52
    Out spokin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    My first 29er SS weighed 29lbs rigid. I then raced multiple endurance events on it with a suspension fork, which put it at about 31lbs. I rode/raced that for almost 3 years. It was dependable and fun.

    Now that I'm wiser (<--sarcasm) I have another 29er SS which is weighing 23lbs. It is also dependable and fun. I tend to be "faster" on it though.

    Fat.
    (~pic~)

    Skinny.
    (~pic~)
    Yo Pod,

    Itemized bike-by-bike retail price lists, please.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  53. #53
    (was) Big in Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    My first 29er SS weighed 29lbs rigid. I then raced multiple endurance events on it with a suspension fork, which put it at about 31lbs. I rode/raced that for almost 3 years. It was dependable and fun.

    Now that I'm wiser (<--sarcasm) I have another 29er SS which is weighing 23lbs. It is also dependable and fun. I tend to be "faster" on it though.

    Fat.

    Skinny.
    Dontcha also weigh about 50 pounds less than when you had the Vulture built? Maybe the major factor in your speed increase, but then again perhaps it IS the Ti, WIWR, how is your new Optimus Ti build going? Started thinking of the wording for your classified ad?
    Ride.

  54. #54
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    As a novice WW it is difficult to imagine where you lost so much weight going from the Vulture to the De Salvo.

    Care to conject on where the big lossees are? The frame and fork should not be that much different, or am I missing something?

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marrkie
    As a novice WW it is difficult to imagine where you lost so much weight going from the Vulture to the De Salvo.

    Care to conject on where the big lossees are? The frame and fork should not be that much different, or am I missing something?

    I suspect the water bottle is filled with helium!

  56. #56
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    Maybe conventions differ in your neck of the woods, but I know and know of plenty of tall and skinny dudes who ride bikes. As such, looking at conventions among cyclists, as opposed to internet blowhards, my use of "euphemistic" was reasonable, if a little bit over your head. Of course, maybe it was over your head because you are a lightweight

    Now why don't you go back to contemplating whatever huge void in your life inspires you to be such a prick.

  57. #57
    You know, for kids
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    HaY HAPPY NEW YEAR GUYS!!!

  58. #58
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    I'm not a weight weenie by any stretch. My SS CX bike weight 21 lbs., whereas some pro level fully geared bikes weight under 18 lbs. It is no stretch to say that my bike is "heavy". I just don't prioritze bike weight enough to spend the money I would need to have a light bike. I can still admit the obvious.

    Yeah, I am thin. But hardly anorexic. Look at guys like CX racers Trebon and Wicks -- tall, skinny and healthy enough to be top echelon US racers. And yeah, a person could be my height and 50 lbs heavier and that could be a perfectly healthy weight for them. My point is that being 6'3" does not mean that you have to start worrying about a light bike failing. Being ~200 lbs. might. But the issue is rider weight, not height.

  59. #59
    Recovering Weight Weenie
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    Geez guys...

    I was about 245lbs when riding the Vulture. I'm About 210 these days.

    Vulture frame = 7 + lbs of potent steel (richwolf, i bet you didn't see that coming!)
    DeSalvo frame = 4.6lbs of ti

    vulture wheelset = rhynolites with woodman/king hub and champion spokes
    desalvo wheelset = 240s on Delgados w/ Comps

    other WWlike parts on the DeSalvo:

    A saddle about 150g lighter
    Brake set up about 150-200g lighter
    Chain about 40g lighter
    Grips are about 50g lighter.
    Pedals about 100g lighter
    Tires/tubes of choice these days are well over 400g lighter overall.

    I could go on and on, but who cares... both bikes are/were dependable and fun...I just beat the DeSalvo up for 3 hours today up in the mountains above the RoseBowl.

  60. #60
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    Just throwing another bike in the mix. My converted KHS soft-tail SS (track ends but still have geared rear hub with spacers, etc) weighs in at 26lbs. That is with pedals and heavy Sun RhinoLite Rims/DeoreLX hubs. Surly Instigator steel fork and mid-level aluminum bits and pieces (Easton EA50 bars, seatpost). And I really don't care much beyond that. I don't race seriously and it rides wonderfully.
    Graeme Hunt Design - www.graemehuntdesign.com

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    My first 29er SS weighed 29lbs rigid. I then raced multiple endurance events on it with a suspension fork, which put it at about 31lbs. I rode/raced that for almost 3 years. It was dependable and fun.

    Now that I'm wiser (<--sarcasm) I have another 29er SS which is weighing 23lbs. It is also dependable and fun. I tend to be "faster" on it though.

    Fat.


    Skinny.
    Are those Profile cranks on both??????

  62. #62
    I can break anything
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    Quote Originally Posted by fezi
    Its only heavy if you think it is. I ride with blokes that ride DH bikes and they smoke most blokes up hills. I've never weighed 1 of my bikes. Is it cheaper for you to loose 5lbs or the bike to loose 5lbs? I know which one would be more beneficial to riding.... and it aint the bike.
    HA! Agreed, I'll start shedding weight from my bike when I can't shed anymore from my stomach/beer container!

  63. #63
    |i|
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    Yes..it's heavier than it should be.

  64. #64
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    Dang I love this thread. My 1x1 comes in around 22.5-23# and I thought it was heavy. It is rigid with no fancy WW parts- but they were chosen with care. Oval cockpit with decent wheels. But I am light and don't break stuff. A weightweenie surly ha ha .

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    I like the way it rides.
    The only thing that matters.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    I've got a Vassago with rigid fork. I've recently started riding it SS. I just weighed it and (including fenders and Garmin) it weighs 26.05 lbs. I would love to have a lighter bike, but I'm just not sure it's possible without throwing a lot of money at it.

    I was thinking about getting a Brooks Team Pro, but that would add close to 300 grams to the bike.

    I like the way it rides. Should I just shut up and keep riding it?
    I had a Surly 1x1.
    I just built up an aluminum frame SS with a mix of the same parts, and some new, lighter parts than were on the 1x1. It built up a lot lighter than the Surly.

    I hopped on the bathroom scale with the new ride and was disappointed to see that it looked to be 25+ pounds.

    I decided not to weight it again :-)

    It rides 'light'.

    Enjoy your bike.

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