My great clyde experiment begins- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    Sock Monkey
    Guest

    My great clyde experiment begins

    A few months ago i posted a question about whether a clyde should even consider single speeding. The response was that I should. But life got busy, I forgot, and then fast forward to today. While surfing the net at my office, I note that bikes direct has some of the Dawes Bulls Eye in a cool metallic green color in my size, for $399. I pulled the trigger!

    So, the beginning of my middle aged clydesdalish single speed experiment is nigh...I hope to have the think built up by the first day of summer.

    Any tips or suggestions on how to set gearing/ upgrades that I might want to consider straight away? I bow to the assembled single speed gurus for their collective knowledge...

  2. #2
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,198
    Get yourself a selection of rear cogs, cheap ones, so you can experiment with different ones until you find the gearing that works for you. Once you find it, source a good wide base cog for long term durability. A chain breaker, extra chain links and some quick links would probably be a good investment also. Upgrades? Limit those to points of contact, saddle, pedals, bars and grips until you start breaking or wearing out parts imo. Good luck. Enjoy the new ride.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Brewtality's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5,736
    I find that I am much more sensitive to wheel weight on my SS than on other bikes. The greatest thing I ever did was get lightweight wheels for it. I can get away with a taller gear when running the lightweight wheelset. 32:18 instead of 32:20.
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Theorhetically I'm a Clydesdale, but I don't race in that class. I've been singlespeeding for awhile, and by no means has my weight held me back from riding SS. I don't know if you race, but some of the faster guys I know are Clydesdale racers.

    My advice from a fellow big guy is the only way to get good at SS is to ride SS a lot. I find my SS riding suffers when I ride geared bikes too much, and my geared riding suffers a bit when I ride SS too much. I wouldn't worry too much about upgrading, but you will need to gear for your trails, unless you keep with what you have and work with it.

    Be patient with SS riding. You will probably walk some hills and get frustrated, but STICK WITH IT.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    6,855
    I'm a super clyde, maybe a super-duper clyde and I am very excited ( I say this until my first ride) to build my SS hopefully very soon. Make sure to keep us updated on how things go once you get the bike and on the dirt/road.
    Super snowflake = when an avatar offends you so much you have to cry about it and report it to admin. Life must suck for you.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Pooch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    135
    I just built up my first SS this spring. Right now it is set up 32:20. On the ride I usually take it on, I can clear all but one hill. Once I clear that hill, I'm changing to an 18 cog. Set your bike up and ride. If you feel like your walking up too easy of hills, change to a higher cog; if you find your spinning too much, change the other way. Experiment and have fun - after all, that's what it is supposed to be.

    And don't worry about getting a SS as a middle-aged Clyde. I'm 48 yrs and 230 lbs. I love the SS and should have got one a long time ago.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    39
    I had a nightmare today, my right knee hurted there. I literally went in panic before I woke up (imagine, no riding?!)!
    I am a clyde, towing 40 kilos behind (my kids) and it feels like my knees got stronger over the last couple of month of riding singlespeed exclusively. I'd never believe it but it's true.
    Good luck with your new ride, hope you'll enjoy it!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: edouble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,672

    I am a 245 lb clyde...

    that has been riding ss for about 4 years now. Started out on 32x20 then moved to 34x20. looking to go 34x19 soon because I can climb all the hills of my local trails without too much difficulty. What helped me a lot was riding my bike up long hills on the streets of NYC and the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The comparatively short steep hills off road ceased being a problem for me.
    EAST COAST
    CLYDESDALE
    DREADLOCKED
    STEEL RIDER

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    714
    I'm over 300 and ride SS pretty much exclusively. ( Cassettes get expensive)

    I like it, and it's not the fastest way around every trail, but it's definitely a lot of fun, simple, less expensive and very rewarding to not have to maintain your bike constantly.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    6,855
    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    I'm over 300 and ride SS pretty much exclusively. ( Cassettes get expensive)

    I like it, and it's not the fastest way around every trail, but it's definitely a lot of fun, simple, less expensive and very rewarding to not have to maintain your bike constantly.
    You are my size. What gearing did you start with and what are you riding now? What shape were you in when you started?
    Super snowflake = when an avatar offends you so much you have to cry about it and report it to admin. Life must suck for you.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    714
    When I started SS, I was 250lbs and very lean. Unfortunately I've severely torn my mcl twice in two years, so I havent been able to keep active, hence the weight.

    I ride relatively flat trails with short steeps, and trends to stick with 32:19,on a 29er. If I know it's a super hilly trail, then 32:21. There is no shame in a lower gear. Low enough to make most climbs, but high vermouth to carry a little speed on the flats. With time, you will adjust gearing to suit your strengths.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    6,855
    Thanks. I know I will get a few different cogs to start and figure out what works, just looking for some baseline suggestions. I appreciate it.
    Super snowflake = when an avatar offends you so much you have to cry about it and report it to admin. Life must suck for you.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BeginnerCycling's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,094
    I'm a clyde too, and have a Nashbar 29er SS on the way. It comes 32x18 -- I'm wondering if I can change to 32x20 without lengthening the chain?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Johnnydrz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    477
    BeginnerCycling, it depends what they decided to use for actual chain length. If the adjustment is at the far end with the 18t, you might be able to fit a 20t without getting a new chain.

    Johnnydrz

  15. #15
    HOV
    HOV is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HOV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    180
    I'm not a clyde but I do believe weight is a good thing when standing/pedal mashing. Heck, heavier dudes may want to run taller gearing due to the mechanical advantage they have when standing on pedals.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Brewtality's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5,736
    Quote Originally Posted by HOV View Post
    I'm not a clyde but I do believe weight is a good thing when standing/pedal mashing. Heck, heavier dudes may want to run taller gearing due to the mechanical advantage they have when standing on pedals.
    You would think that might work, but you still have to move your bulk up the hill. Unless you are a genetic freak, super fit but big, the weight still catches up with you.
    Its easy for a small fit rider to gain enough cycling strength to move up hills with a tall gear. Its much harder for us big guys to gain the same power to weight ratio.
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  17. #17
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,212
    Knees?

    Are you standing up to climb?

    Turning a hard (for you or me) gear seated can be really hard on the knees. Standing up, something is different: knee angles, leverages, ...

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  18. #18
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    Part of single speeding is learning to climb out of the saddle a lot. You will spend a ton of time standing and grinding up climbs. Seated climbing is great, but as your cadence slows drastically, you need to get out of the saddle. That's part of not having those low gear ratios to sit and spin.

    Also, make sure you run a low enough gear. You want to spin on the flat sections and have a low enough gear to comfortably get out of the saddle and climb with without killing your back and/or knees. You will need to get off and walk from time to time. That's just a compromise of SSing.

  19. #19
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,212
    A while ago, I rode my rigid singlespeed with a couple of guys on geared FS bikes. After a bumpy flatland section and a slightly steep smooth uphill, one of them panted: "How can you keep going like that?" My answer: "I can't really, but if I slow down it gets even harder for me."

    To be fair, he had only been riding smooth surfaces since last year, and didn't quite have his trail legs and lungs.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.