My first SS...you'll want to see this.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    The Dog.
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    My first SS...you'll want to see this.

    About a month ago my gf convinced me to go check out this local guy who is always selling old bikes on his front lawn. She wanted me to get this Orange Peugot, but it was too small. So, I looked around some more and found an old Univega Gran Rally. The second I saw the "Tange Champion" label I knew it was for me. Turns out it was the perfect size.

    As you can see, the frame and fork underwent some slight modifications. Stripping the paint was a major pain and so was painting it for that matter. It rides like a dream and the 32-13 gearing is perfect for speeding around campus.

    My only problem is that I'm having drive side slipping. I replaced the aluminum locknuts with bitey steel ones and the steel quick release is insanely tight (I know...I know...I loosened the hub adjustment a bit). I've got a Surly Tuggnut on the way, I just hope it fits my forward facing dropouts better than the BMX tug my LBS had.

    Now before any of you go and attribute this paint scheme to the climbing jersey of the tour you should go and watch a little film entitled, "Tread." Also, the red dots on the brake levers were serendipitous...they came on the bike.

    Enjoy.




  2. #2
    No Justice = No Peace
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    Nice Bike

    Call me crazy, but that thing is gonna be a real handful on the trails....
    "Welcome to my underground lair...."

  3. #3
    The Dog.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lutarious
    Call me crazy, but that thing is gonna be a real handful on the trails....
    Dude...you are nuts.

  4. #4
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    You don't have these on your dropouts? My wheel won't move a mm...


  5. #5
    Samsonite Tester
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogdude222
    About a month ago my gf convinced me to go check out this local guy who is always selling old bikes on his front lawn. She wanted me to get this Orange Peugot, but it was too small. So, I looked around some more and found an old Univega Gran Rally. The second I saw the "Tange Champion" label I knew it was for me. Turns out it was the perfect size.

    As you can see, the frame and fork underwent some slight modifications. Stripping the paint was a major pain and so was painting it for that matter. It rides like a dream and the 32-13 gearing is perfect for speeding around campus.

    My only problem is that I'm having drive side slipping. I replaced the aluminum locknuts with bitey steel ones and the steel quick release is insanely tight (I know...I know...I loosened the hub adjustment a bit). I've got a Surly Tuggnut on the way, I just hope it fits my forward facing dropouts better than the BMX tug my LBS had.

    Now before any of you go and attribute this paint scheme to the climbing jersey of the tour you should go and watch a little film entitled, "Tread." Also, the red dots on the brake levers were serendipitous...they came on the bike.

    Enjoy.



    Nice bike.

    Tread and ReTread are some of my favorite films. That rack on the auger in mobile is the bomb.
    Yeah I gotta question. You got any excuses tonight Roy ? -Antonio Tarver

    There is room for it all, just ride what you like to on what you like to...that's freeriding. -rbn14



  6. #6
    The Dog.
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    Quote Originally Posted by George2
    You don't have these on your dropouts? My wheel won't move a mm...

    Sure I have those, but wheels tend to move forward in the dropouts, not backwards. So, those little screws don't do anything to keep your wheel from hitting the non drive side chain stay.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogdude222
    Sure I have those, but wheels tend to move forward in the dropouts, not backwards. So, those little screws don't do anything to keep your wheel from hitting the non drive side chain stay.
    I tend to disagree. Only your driveside tends to move forward cause that is where the chain pulls it. Your driveside can't move forward if your non-drive side can't move backward. The lil' screws keep the axle straight and the wheel from the chainstays, works for me. Worked for Eddy Merckx and tons of other pro riders who really stomped hard back in the days as well

  8. #8
    The Dog.
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    Quote Originally Posted by George2
    I tend to disagree. Only your driveside tends to move forward cause that is where the chain pulls it. Your driveside can't move forward if your non-drive side can't move backward. The lil' screws keep the axle straight and the wheel from the chainstays, works for me. Worked for Eddy Merckx and tons of other pro riders who really stomped hard back in the days as well
    Well, I guess you are entitled to your opinion, but just because the non-drive side cannot move does not mean the drive cannot as well. The non-drive side just becomes a point of rotation for the drive side.

    There are many, many people who use chain tugs just on the drive side. If it wasn't necessary, then why would they do it? Besides...I have witnessed the very phenomenon that you say is impossible. The non-drive side butts up against the adjuster bolt and then my wheel pops out of the drive side dropout forcing the wheel into the non-drive side chainstay.

    Here are Surly's own words about the tuggnut:
    "We sell it as a single, because you really only need one...on the drive side."

    Granted, Surly's don't have the non-drive side bolt, but still. Here is a link to a guy who even has semi-vertical dropouts and his drive side was slipping:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...ght=chain+thug

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogdude222
    Well, I guess you are entitled to your opinion, but just because the non-drive side cannot move does not mean the drive cannot as well. The non-drive side just becomes a point of rotation for the drive side.

    There are many, many people who use chain tugs just on the drive side. If it wasn't necessary, then why would they do it? Besides...I have witnessed the very phenomenon that you say is impossible. The non-drive side butts up against the adjuster bolt and then my wheel pops out of the drive side dropout forcing the wheel into the non-drive side chainstay.

    Here are Surly's own words about the tuggnut:
    "We sell it as a single, because you really only need one...on the drive side."

    Granted, Surly's don't have the non-drive side bolt, but still. Here is a link to a guy who even has semi-vertical dropouts and his drive side was slipping:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...ght=chain+thug
    Impossible is a big word If you didn' have movement you wouldn't have posted the problem, now would you? I was just curious wether you (still) had the screws. Some people take them out because they look flimsy. I was sceptic on the set-up on my own bike myself, but to my (pleasant) surprise it never moved. Anyway, over here in Holland they're specific tensioners for forward facing dropouts (for use on around town bikes). They might work better fot you then a tuggnut or likewise. They're fairly simple and yo might be able to cobble one together yourself. If you're interested I'll snap (and post) a picture

  10. #10
    The Dog.
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    Quote Originally Posted by George2
    If you're interested I'll snap (and post) a picture
    That would be so great. I would really appreciate it. Thanks!

  11. #11
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    There you go. Crappy shots but you'll get the picture Basicly they're just a thin steel strip folded around the dropout (they're thin enough to easily fit inside the frame as well) The screws push against the frame (on a flattened spot so they don't slip) and there is a small nut hidden inside the fold.

    The bike is my clunker, living outside because there is no room inside. There are tons of these in Amsterdam so you might say singlespeeding is very popular over here

  12. #12
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    i cant tell but if that is a modern QR skewer back there you muight just want to see if the LBS has some odler school heavy duty steel ones.

    even just the nut from one of those older skewers (heavy, wide, made of metal) will bite much better than the newfangled plastic ocovered ones.

    just sayin, i am 230 and have never needed a tensioner...

    also cheaper than a tensioner might be just converting the axle in back to a solid one... then you can tighten down the tracknuts and you'll be tensioned up good and proper.

  13. #13
    Mtn Biker Machinist
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    2nd the axle swap

    I have Schwinn world traveler with forward facing drops, and I just pulled the QR axle and swapped it for a solid axle. The theads just have to be the same, and the length long enough to accomodate the dropout thickness and the nuts. The surly ss hub has an axle with the same thread as most shimano axles, but your LBS should be able to help you get the right one. Cost is between $8 and $15. Good Luck

  14. #14
    The Dog.
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    Quote Originally Posted by George2

    Yep...that looks like exactly what I need. Thanks for those great pics. They'll be a great help if the tuggnut does not work.

  15. #15
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    the older steel shimano QRs seem to be the best for clamping a singlespeed without slippage

    i have campy QRs on my SS roadie, before i fitted the surly tuggnut i had chain tension/axle slippage issues...

  16. #16
    The Dog.
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    Thanks for all the great suggestions.

    The quick release on their is an old steel shimano one from the 90's with a brand new, super-bitey end nut. I definitely considered switching to a longer axle, but the LBS owner thought we should first try some steel campy locknuts. It barely slips at all now. I can ride for a week without loosing too much chain tension, so hopefully the tuggnut will put the problem away for good. It comes today, so I'll keep you updated. If it doesn't work, then I'll either ask the school machinist to make a new slider for it or I'll switch the axle to a longer one.

    Thanks again!

  17. #17
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    if the tugnut doesn't work your going to be breaking metal parts so you'll know... i seriously doubt you'll have a problem.

    one oyther thing to look at is: if you feel like you chain is loosening but your wheel isn't moving it mioght just be chainstretch. some chains really get loose as they break in. you might have to adjust the dropouts a few times as the chain stretches initially to compensate.

  18. #18
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    If the chain is wearing enough in a week to create slack there's something else mighty wrong. No decent chain will wear enough in that short of time to be noticeable. If properly maintained a chain shouldn't wear enough in hundreds of miles to be noticeable.

  19. #19
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    Another suggestion that I have never seen discussed...use larger gears. Meaning, to keep the same gear ratio as your current 32-13, try something like a 42-17. Basicly the same ratio, but there will be a lot less tension on the chain (about 1/3 less in this example). Less tension on the chain equals less chance of the axle slipping. Plus the drivetrain will last a lot longer. I understand you probably used parts you had laying around, but if you have some larger gears around, give them a try.

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