Mosso Aluminium Rigid fork anyone?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Mosso Aluminium Rigid fork anyone?

    http://one9.us/blog/cycling/mosso-al...id-fork-review

    Just read a review of it. Sounds pretty good for the price and weight.

    My only two concerns over the fork are: the "brutal ride" threats and over its strength.

    P.S: I do purely XC.

    Brutal ride threat:

    My wrists have never really hurt while trail riding. Though the obstacles in the trail i ride on are rather minor( small rocky sections and roots).

    Will a change in riding style(holding the front more loosely and pulling the fork over obstacles) and tire pressue(say 30-35 psi) help to reduce the effects of a stiff aluminium?

    Strength:

    This is not really a issue Im very concerned about. I am not a very hardcore rider.I am a cross-country rider. Might plan to do some short/mid rocky downhills but im rather sure the 7005 series aluminium will hold up well.

    Still, does anyone has comments/reviews/opinions over the fork?

    It looks like this:

    Taken from the link i posted above.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    http://one9.us/blog/cycling/mosso-al...id-fork-review

    Just read a review of it. Sounds pretty good for the price and weight.

    My only two concerns over the fork are: the "brutal ride" threats and over its strength.

    P.S: I do purely XC.

    Brutal ride threat:

    My wrists have never really hurt while trail riding. Though the obstacles in the trail i ride on are rather minor( small rocky sections and roots).

    Will a change in riding style(holding the front more loosely and pulling the fork over obstacles) and tire pressue(say 30-35 psi) help to reduce the effects of a stiff aluminium?

    Strength:

    This is not really a issue Im very concerned about. I am not a very hardcore rider.I am a cross-country rider. Might plan to do some short/mid rocky downhills but im rather sure the 7005 series aluminium will hold up well.

    Still, does anyone has comments/reviews/opinions over the fork?

    It looks like this:

    Taken from the link i posted above.
    SS rigid REQUIRES different grip....looser grip and go with the flow, but don't let your hands slide off the ends...lol. I would NOT use an aluminum rigid fork off-road anywhere imo due to ride and long-term strength. You also must run slightly lower tire pressure....all depends on YOUR terrain and body fitness/strength.

    Look for a steel fork that meets same dimensional requirements........imo...
    Last edited by Natedogz; 10-30-2009 at 08:39 PM.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  3. #3
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    That curve looks like it would make for a stiff fork. I'm running steel forks on my rigids with Jones bars. Good combo IMO.

  4. #4
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    Have you considered Niner's Carbon? Very plush and smooth - noticeably different than steel. If carbon is out I would take the steel for over aluminum any day.

  5. #5
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    There's a reason springs are made out of steel and not out of aluminum. If they make the aluminum fork stong enough to survive, it'll ride like a chunk of granite.

    If not...

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  6. #6
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    I was looking at the straight Mosso aluminum forks on fleabay and almost got seduced by the crazy light (650 grams) and cheap price. I ended up going with a steel Surly 1x1 fork from Universal for $53 (canti only) and only weighs a little over 1000 grams. Enough opinions like those above convinced me that aluminum rigid might be a bad idea for my econo conversion.

  7. #7
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    Ok guys thank for the comments! Will be going for a Kona P2 fork instead that fits into my budget

  8. #8
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    I've been running one for almost a year now but mine is the straight blade one without the curve. It is brutal on bumpy roads and through rocky sections but does great in the sand and smooth sections of trail when running low psi. I love it for climbing because it is so light and easy to maneuver. I do agree that a steel fork is much better in terms of comfort but I have had no problems with mine yet.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mosso Aluminium Rigid fork anyone?-bike1.jpg  


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbx tacos
    I've been running one for almost a year now but mine is the straight blade one without the curve. It is brutal on bumpy roads and through rocky sections but does great in the sand and smooth sections of trail when running low psi. I love it for climbing because it is so light and easy to maneuver. I do agree that a steel fork is much better in terms of comfort but I have had no problems with mine yet.

    Hi there. Looks like you have the carbon edition. It looks great.. its carbon wrapped alu right?


    I particulaly like your bike. Somehow it reminds me of the beauty of simplicity found in SS bikes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbx tacos
    I've been running one for almost a year now but mine is the straight blade one without the curve. It is brutal on bumpy roads and through rocky sections but does great in the sand and smooth sections of trail when running low psi. I love it for climbing because it is so light and easy to maneuver. I do agree that a steel fork is much better in terms of comfort but I have had no problems with mine yet.

    Those XC pro levers? I love mine, best levers I've ever used. Can't tell in the pic. What canties are you using?

  11. #11
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    Mine actually isn't the carbon wrapped one. It is just aluminum. Found Here

    Levers are Dia Compe Power control 11 with LX cantis.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    Ok guys thank for the comments! Will be going for a Kona P2 fork instead that fits into my budget
    You might want to reconsider that idea? From what I've read, it's considered one of the more harsh riding steel forks. I'd opt for a Salsa if money were no object but since it is, I'm going to try the cheap route, at least for now, & just buy this.

    Good luck.

  13. #13
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    Reviving this thread to see if anybody has any more feedback on these cheapo aluminum forks. Seems like a big tire with low pressure should do more for ride quality than fork flex...right? As long as it's not gonna break in half on me on moderate xc trails, I might give one a go.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmkimmel
    Reviving this thread to see if anybody has any more feedback on these cheapo aluminum forks. Seems like a big tire with low pressure should do more for ride quality than fork flex...right? As long as it's not gonna break in half on me on moderate xc trails, I might give one a go.
    I don't have the first hand experience to back it up, but Sparticus nailed my thoughts on the matter above with "There's a reason springs are made out of steel and not aluminum".

    As for your argument that a big tire with low pressure should do more for ride quality: Perhaps your right, but you are adding rotational weight and rolling resistance to save a little weight which is not rotational. I'd go with a salsa chromoto, it's been my favorite rigid fork so far.

  15. #15
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    Maybe not all al forks are equal but here is what guitar ted had to say about the misfit fork:

    from twentynineinches

    The fork offered for the diSSent is outstanding, and I was quite surprised by the performance of this lightweight aluminum piece. It had excellent ride qualities, not unlike the better carbon forks I have ridden. No lateral flex to bother mentioning, and steering precision was top notch. Again though, you should consider a big, fat tire as an ally in warding off bigger trail hits with the diSSent.

    I have had mine on and off as I tend to go with the sussy fork too. Notice a big difference in weight and wheel lifting. Obviously not bombing when rigid but tracks incredibly...

    Can be found here for 90 bills:

    http://www.psyclestore.com/products/...igid-Fork.html

  16. #16
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    ive had mosso alloy forks previously. Whilst cheap and light the ride quality is pretty darn shocking. Ontop of that their A-C height seem to be SUPER SUPER short which would steepen most HA on todays bikes! Becareful of this. Last thing you want is to ride on a 76degreed bike LOL

    Put it this way, low pressure tyres make a difference but so does forks! If you are riding rigid you are kinda up **** creek already so you want the COMBINED effect of low pressure and also supple rigid forks!


  17. #17
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    I owned a mosso straight aluminum fork on a commuter for about a week. It bent at the crown/steerer junction, so now it's a makeshift truing stand.

    In fairness, I'm probably too heavy for the fork at 210, and I used it with disc brakes, which stressed it quite a bit. I did like the nearly weightless front end feel.

    If you're relatively light, using Linear/canti brakes, dont mind the short A/C length, and aren't going to abuse it. Give it a shot. Otherwise steer clear.
    It's your thing, Do what you want to do

  18. #18
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    Hmm...great feedback here. Thanks everybody!

    DanD - I hear you - I 'd hate to trade static weight for rotating, but let's be honest. I've ridden rigid carbon, steel (high and low end), and ti. In my mind, rigid is rigid when compared to squishy forks, so I'm gonna run a big ass tire no matter what fork it's connected to. I suppose if I bought a black sheep/jones ti fork, I might be able to get away with a smaller tire, but that's not in the cards

    JBX tacos - do you have any idea what the BB height is on your bike with that fork? I don't want the pedals dragging in the ground on my supah-cheap Nashbar alu mtb frame...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmkimmel
    Hmm...great feedback here. Thanks everybody!
    JBX tacos - do you have any idea what the BB height is on your bike with that fork? I don't want the pedals dragging in the ground on my supah-cheap Nashbar alu mtb frame...
    The bb height on my bike is about 11.5 inches, but my frame is from 1996 and originally had a fork with a short ac.
    I'm running the original 175mm cranks and have never had them drag on anything.
    "I've got a full on robot chubby." -Evil Theodore "Ted" Logan

  20. #20
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    I ran a straight fork like jbx tacos's (looks like the MTB FK26M3 on the mosso website) for about a year - maybe a year and a bit. It is 100mm suspension corrected so ocassionally I fitted a 29 inch wheel with a 2.1 tyre WTB moto raptor on it. The tyre had about 3mm clearance. The bike is a Giant Boulder 26 inch.
    I used this fork with the 29er wheel (as well as a 26 inch wheel fitted with a 2.5 WTB dissent tyre) for quite a few runs at the You Yangs, Australia. I took it through rocky sections and some small jumps, etc. I also used the bike as a commuter every once in a while. Still, it should be noted that I have a few other bikes so it was not used every day, or even every weekend.
    The fork is crazy light and it has quite a bit of flex, you can see it mostly when braking. It performed quite well for a year or so. It is not too hard on the wrists.
    All the time I had the fork I felt a little uncomfortable about its flex and durability.
    Fair enough, a week ago I checked it and it has a huge crack just above the brake caliper screw point. If I did not check it, it would have certainly failed.The crack is spread over half of the left steerer.
    Bottom line: if you want to use it for a commuter or want to run it only for a season, it may be a viable option. Otherwise, only use it if you like really extreme sports, like suddently riding without a front wheel.

  21. #21
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    I have had three of these forks.
    Can't say anything about angle, geometry,axle to crown bla, bla ...
    I can say that i have never had any issues with the Al. version.
    I have a Carbon or carbon wrapped. It's waiting for ... my next build.
    They are pretty harsh. They are very light. Add a big fat 2.5 tire and enjoy.
    For the price, you can't go wrong.

  22. #22
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    I use a short stem placing the axle in front of the bar to take the sting out of a rigid fork, as opposed to having the bar over the axle. I currently have a 50mm stem and a segmented steel Waltworks fork that's nice and springy, not to be confused with flexy.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I use a short stem placing the axle in front of the bar to take the sting out of a rigid fork, as opposed to having the bar over the axle.
    I guess I fail to see the logic there. Fork flex stays consistent regardless of stem length. I would think a short stem would be less flexible and therefore, more harsh than a longer stem.

    Maybe you're noticing it's less harsh with a shortie because less of your weight is on your hands vs a longer stem?

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