Moots Mooto X RSL (or any Moots experience)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Moots Mooto X RSL (or any Moots experience)

    I have wanted a Moots since the mid 90's and I am finally in a position to be able to afford one, but they are crazy money! So I wanted to see if I could get some opinions from current owners.

    I am looking for first hand experience with the current generation Moots mountain bikes, prefer set up as a single speed but any will work. By current generation I mean bikes with the PF BB. What has your experience been overall, worth the $? How much do you weigh, where, and how do you ride? How does the frame handle those conditions? Are you getting any excessive lateral flex especially in the BB? Any other thought in general would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Moots Mooto X RSL (or any Moots experience)-0d87af9c-f9e1-4321-8a84-0278cb817285.jpgMoots Mooto X RSL (or any Moots experience)-498f4306-e220-485f-900f-f279a572db9a.jpgI always wanted a titanium frame. My Friends have owned Moots, Lynskey and Litespeed. They loved em all. After extensive research but very little riding I went with Lynskey unridden. Price on the Pro 29 DI2 XT 2 x build was so much less than Moots, it was an easy call after talking to 10 Lynskey owners. After receiving the frame about a month ago, all the discussions about weld quality between the manufacturers turned out to be a joke. I am in disbelief about how smooth, responsive and fast this bike turned out. I tried to negotiate price with Moots. That was a waste of time. At 64 years old and having owned 24 bikes, I now own the most comfortable, smoothest and fastest mountain bike ever! Whatever you do, go with etched logos and brushed finish. No paint to chip and so easy to keep looking brand new. I rode titanium bikes before but never long enough to appreciate its properties. When you own a bike that makes you smile as soon as you start to pedal, life just seems even more sweeter. Lynskey treated me very well. Going back for a new ride for my wife.

  3. #3
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    If you're trying to balance performance and price then I agree with Pedalon2018 and recommend checking out Lynskey. I also considered Moots when building up my SS endurance race bike a few months ago but after talking to a few shops and people who own them, I couldn't justify the nearly $4k frame entry price. I ended up getting a good deal on a Ridgeline frame after contacting Lynskey.

    I can give you my opinions about the Lynskey if you want...but for now I don't want to derail the thread since you specifically asked about Moots.

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys! I currently have a Kona Raijin (made by Lynskey) and have owned a Pro 29 6-4, & a Sportive, so I know Lynskey. I also owned a custom Cysco Ti for several years. Iím just thinking about trying a Moots, not really trying to justify the performance with the price b/c I know there is a point of diminishing returns and Moots is probably past that.

  5. #5
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    If you have the time I encourage you to swing by Moots in person. They are super cool & accommodating. Take one for a demo on the local trails and see what you think. I donít think you would be disappointed.


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  6. #6
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    Comparing a Lynskey to a Moots is apples to oranges.

    If you are close to Moots, definitely stop by and see them.

    Those things said, you won't regret the Moots. Can you say that about Lynskey?
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  7. #7
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    Unfortunately I am in Maine its a long way to Steamboat to demo a bike, but damn I would love to.

    Honestly I enjoy all my Lynskey's. Not to mention I grew up mountain biking in North Georgia in the late 80's - early 90's, I was right down the road from Litespeed when David started the company. So I kind of have a connection to the company, makes me think of home. My only complaint of the Lynskey bikes is they seem to be a bit flexy in the BB (well the Pro 29 6-4 was not that bad in the BB). I would like a little bit stiffer frame. But with that being said I have always wanted a Moots, who doesn't...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
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ID:	1197879I always wanted a titanium frame. My Friends have owned Moots, Lynskey and Litespeed. They loved em all. After extensive research but very little riding I went with Lynskey unridden. Price on the Pro 29 DI2 XT 2 x build was so much less than Moots, it was an easy call after talking to 10 Lynskey owners. After receiving the frame about a month ago, all the discussions about weld quality between the manufacturers turned out to be a joke. I am in disbelief about how smooth, responsive and fast this bike turned out. I tried to negotiate price with Moots. That was a waste of time. At 64 years old and having owned 24 bikes, I now own the most comfortable, smoothest and fastest mountain bike ever! Whatever you do, go with etched logos and brushed finish. No paint to chip and so easy to keep looking brand new. I rode titanium bikes before but never long enough to appreciate its properties. When you own a bike that makes you smile as soon as you start to pedal, life just seems even more sweeter. Lynskey treated me very well. Going back for a new ride for my wife.
    Quote Originally Posted by azjonboy View Post
    Comparing a Lynskey to a Moots is apples to oranges.

    If you are close to Moots, definitely stop by and see them.

    Those things said, you won't regret the Moots. Can you say that about Lynskey?
    I rode a Moots a long while ago and only for a few minutes. What I can say is the Moots equipped to my desired requirements was three hundred dollars short of costing double what I paid for the Lynskey. Seriously huge money difference for what you say is apple and oranges. I say you are incorrect. Besides, the flex some claim is not there in the Pro 29 with the oversized twisted down tube. I am totally satisfied with the frame built for DI2 XT 2x and saved huge dollars. And some of the older Moots look very loopy to me. To each there own. I have my best bike out of the 24 I own/owned. And besides, who cares. Safe Travels!

  9. #9
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    I own a Pro 29 SL. I'd love to swing my leg over a Moots soft-tail. It's just money, make more!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    I rode a Moots a long while ago and only for a few minutes. What I can say is the Moots equipped to my desired requirements was three hundred dollars short of costing double what I paid for the Lynskey. Seriously huge money difference for what you say is apple and oranges. I say you are incorrect. Besides, the flex some claim is not there in the Pro 29 with the oversized twisted down tube. I am totally satisfied with the frame built for DI2 XT 2x and saved huge dollars. And some of the older Moots look very loopy to me. To each there own. I have my best bike out of the 24 I own/owned. And besides, who cares. Safe Travels!
    Yes, I agree the Pro 29 I owned was noticeably stiffer than the other Ti frames I have owned.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by solo-x View Post
    It's just money, make more!
    True statement! Maybe Ill end up with one if they can hit my geometry. Do you think they will be offended if I tell them to build it to the geometry of my Raijin?? HA

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbell View Post
    True statement! Maybe Ill end up with one if they can hit my geometry. Do you think they will be offended if I tell them to build it to the geometry of my Raijin?? HA
    Speaking of another Ti frame I want to swing a leg over, I want a Raijin too. I'm a bit of a Ti fan boi I think.

    <- try to make more money, but (N+1)*Ti is a tougher formula to work with.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbell View Post
    True statement! Maybe Ill end up with one if they can hit my geometry. Do you think they will be offended if I tell them to build it to the geometry of my Raijin?? HA
    Ha! It sounds like you mostly want the Moots name. Nothing wrong with that at all.

    When I was considering one I never heard about one defining feature of a Moots that everyone liked, aside from quality. Only one shop said they had one frame ever come back with a problem. I certainly can see the value if you're a bigger rider and/or you're doing something like Tour Divide where a broken frame would be catastrophic. I'm in neither category so I discounted that aspect.

    I suspect with your experience on Ti you'd need to get on one to figure out if the ride characteristics are worth it. Even then I bet you'd be making the decision at the margin so it would be hard to choose unless you've got fat stacks of cash laying around.

    Keep us posted on what you do. I'm curious to hear how a Moots compares to other Ti frames, especially in the realm of an endurance SS racing setup.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by economatic View Post
    Ha! It sounds like you mostly want the Moots name. Nothing wrong with that at all.

    When I was considering one I never heard about one defining feature of a Moots that everyone liked, aside from quality. Only one shop said they had one frame ever come back with a problem. I certainly can see the value if you're a bigger rider and/or you're doing something like Tour Divide where a broken frame would be catastrophic. I'm in neither category so I discounted that aspect.

    I suspect with your experience on Ti you'd need to get on one to figure out if the ride characteristics are worth it. Even then I bet you'd be making the decision at the margin so it would be hard to choose unless you've got fat stacks of cash laying around.

    Keep us posted on what you do. I'm curious to hear how a Moots compares to other Ti frames, especially in the realm of an endurance SS racing setup.
    It is in part wanting the Moots name, but probably more so I want to know if they are actually worth 2 times (or more) the money. The only real way to answer that question is to buy one, so...

    I will definitely keep this thread updated if I end up buying one. With that said I really likes my Cysco Ti frame, it was excellent but I ended up cracking it in 2 places. They took care of it, but I had a hard time trusting it. I felt like the Pro 29 6-4 was noticeably stiffer in the right ways, and I liked the 69* HTA better than the 71*, I just wish it had sliders so I could set it up properly single speed. I was talking to Lynskey about building a Pro 29 with sliders when a friend mentioned the Raijin. After looking at the Geo and knowing it was built by Lynskey and has a lifetime warranty through Kona I went that route instead. I honestly think the Raijin is the BEST single speed I have ever ridded, and there have been many along the way not just the few Ti frames I mentioned. I just wish it was a little stiffer in the BB for a bit snappier power transfer. Plus I cant leave well enough alone and want to see if there is anything better...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbell View Post
    It is in part wanting the Moots name, but probably more so I want to know if they are actually worth 2 times (or more) the money. The only real way to answer that question is to buy one, so...

    I will definitely keep this thread updated if I end up buying one. With that said I really likes my Cysco Ti frame, it was excellent but I ended up cracking it in 2 places. They took care of it, but I had a hard time trusting it. I felt like the Pro 29 6-4 was noticeably stiffer in the right ways, and I liked the 69* HTA better than the 71*, I just wish it had sliders so I could set it up properly single speed. I was talking to Lynskey about building a Pro 29 with sliders when a friend mentioned the Raijin. After looking at the Geo and knowing it was built by Lynskey and has a lifetime warranty through Kona I went that route instead. I honestly think the Raijin is the BEST single speed I have ever ridded, and there have been many along the way not just the few Ti frames I mentioned. I just wish it was a little stiffer in the BB for a bit snappier power transfer. Plus I cant leave well enough alone and want to see if there is anything better...
    Nice post and well thought out. I did research before I went Lynskey and after six months of talking to as many owners of all bike frames as possible, viewing vids and posts, I realized all frames break regardless of material. Some I saw broken was due to repeated big hits and some just cracked for apparently no know reason. I finally went with a Company that will do the right thing if ever needed. i know some of the big boys have not done that. Moots is priced beyond reason in my view. Now I usually buy the higher end stuff to limit upgrades later. In my view which only includes five hundred miles of fast type riding, I feel I could not have done better. The Pro 29 2018 is fast, fun, stiff, Ti smooth and soooo comfortable. When I start some of my cars, it makes me smile just like when I first start pedaling the Pro. Remarkable bike imho.

  16. #16
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    For me it is really about the experience (that feeling you get when riding quality) than any real performance gains (which in all honesty would be none). I get what your saying.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbell View Post
    It is in part wanting the Moots name, but probably more so I want to know if they are actually worth 2 times (or more) the money. The only real way to answer that question is to buy one, so...

    I will definitely keep this thread updated if I end up buying one. With that said I really likes my Cysco Ti frame, it was excellent but I ended up cracking it in 2 places. They took care of it, but I had a hard time trusting it. I felt like the Pro 29 6-4 was noticeably stiffer in the right ways, and I liked the 69* HTA better than the 71*, I just wish it had sliders so I could set it up properly single speed. I was talking to Lynskey about building a Pro 29 with sliders when a friend mentioned the Raijin. After looking at the Geo and knowing it was built by Lynskey and has a lifetime warranty through Kona I went that route instead. I honestly think the Raijin is the BEST single speed I have ever ridded, and there have been many along the way not just the few Ti frames I mentioned. I just wish it was a little stiffer in the BB for a bit snappier power transfer. Plus I cant leave well enough alone and want to see if there is anything better...
    You've added insult to injury by saying the Raijin is the best single speed you've been on! I tried desperately to get a Raijin late last season to replace my Carver 420 but the distributor in the NW and all shops were out of them in my size. It was going to be my do-it-all bike for endurance racing, bikepacking, and everything in between.

    I guess it worked out though. I applied the n+1 rule and kept the Carver and also built up the Lynskey as more of a XC race bike. But I'm sure in the not too distant future I'll be searching for better options like you're doing.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by economatic View Post
    You've added insult to injury by saying the Raijin is the best single speed you've been on! I tried desperately to get a Raijin late last season to replace my Carver 420 but the distributor in the NW and all shops were out of them in my size. It was going to be my do-it-all bike for endurance racing, bikepacking, and everything in between.

    I guess it worked out though. I applied the n+1 rule and kept the Carver and also built up the Lynskey as more of a XC race bike. But I'm sure in the not too distant future I'll be searching for better options like you're doing.
    The funny thing about my Raijin is I bought it from Forrest at Bath Cycle & Ski Bikeman (home of Carver). I work like 10 min from there, we talked about the 420 but I needed at least 2 bottles. Forrest is a good guy and the shop is great! I think I must have gotten one of the last Raijin's made, I have heard from lots of people who tried to get one but couldn't.

  19. #19
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    If you've wanted a Moots for that long and you have the cash. Order an Eriksen

    Seriously.

    Moots are nice though.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by briscoelab View Post
    If you've wanted a Moots for that long and you have the cash. Order an Eriksen

    Seriously.

    Moots are nice though.
    Four years ago I rode the straight non-RSL/YBB Moots 29er for a few weeks before they discontinued it. Then borrowed a friend's custom Steve Potts 29er rigid that was two sizes too big. The Moots was nice but I went with the Potts and a 100mm fork. I waited 11 months but worth every day.

    Eriksen- Brad Bingham has largely taken over welding and fabrication. Kent still measures and advises from what I understand. I would like a 27.5. Today I would choose choose in no particular order : Eriksen, another Potts, Carl Strong or Jim Kish (closest to you in N. Carolina).

    Yes Moots are outstanding but having the custom bike built specifically for you is really special. And the pricing compared to Moots is close to the same.

  21. #21
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    I hear ya about the custom geo frame, however I am one of the lucky few who almost perfectly fit on a lot of "standard large frames". I decided to build a Pivot Les, and keep my current Ti frame as a 2nd bike. I just cant justify over $5000 for a frame that Ill likely brake (even if it has a lifetime warranty). BTW I built the Les with Pillar Carbon I9 wheels, Fox 34sc, and nice carbon everything else for the cost of the Moots frame...

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