Mongoose Deception going SS- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Mongoose Deception going SS

    I hope to get some help . First off I know this is a $200.00 bike and this forum is a high end bike form,but I love the look of this frame.
    i like riding this bike and I want to go SS and by doing this I don't mind adding front forks that cost as much as the bike. I want to build a nice bike and I'm a newbie to working on bikes so any advice is welcome.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mongoose Deception going SS-image.jpg  


  2. #2
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    You'll need a tensioner because the dropouts won't slide and the bottom bracket doesn't look like it will take an EBB. Definitely upgrade the fork and maybe even consider going rigid. If you like the bike there's nothing wrong with turning it into something you'll enjoy even more. I'd guess brakes and wheels would be good places to look at upgrading too. And there's a good chance the crankset won't work either...I'd guess it's probably riveted so you won't be able to remove any of the chainrings.

    In all honesty...all you really have is a frame. I'd pretty much start with a bare frame and build from there. It all depends on what you are looking for in a final product.
    Kona Big Unit SS
    Kona Private Jake SSCX
    DiamondBack Release 3
    Norco Torrent HT 7.1

  3. #3
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    Nubster that was what I was thinking use only the frame . And see where it goes now I need to build a parts list.

    Hey maybe like this is the frame to use what would you add. Sounds like a Thread starter here.

  4. #4
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    Going ss on an old frame is a great idea, great way to get into single-speed.

    Only problem is, a lot of inexpensive bikes have welded-on chainrings, you can't swap em out. You might have to get on ebay to find a crankset that will let you run one ring up front. No biggie, just gotta take it apart, see what kind of bottom bracket you have, and be a smart shopper.

    Get a chain breaker and learn how to use it; in particular, learn how to push the pin back in to splice the chain. There are youtube video's on how to do this. Then, drill out your cassette so you have a handful of cogs to try. Use the middle chainring and try a couple of different cogs and see if you can find a combo that doesn't require a chain tensioner. If you find one combo, there will be others.

    There should be some spacers in that cassette you took apart. That and a short section of PVC pipe should get your chainline spaced out. Bottom bracket spacers can be used as freewheel hub spacers, so if you buy a new bb you might have some spares to use.

    I hate chain tensioners. Although if you have to have one, your old derailleur will probably work better than anything. If you're thinking about getting new wheels, check out the White Industries eccentric hub, you can make any frame single speed with that sucker.

    But basically, if you're trying to go ss on the cheap, look for that "magic ratio" that doesn't need a chain tensioner, it's a good learning experience and the price is right

  5. #5
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    Tampadave thanks for the post and info.

  6. #6
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    Keep us posted.

    Interested to see where you go with the fork. Rigid is an inexpensive way to go and if you like ss the light weight and simplicity of a chromoly fork has a lot of appeal. But, there is a market for certain used suspension forks, pick the right one and it could be a decent investment. Measure the ac length (from the axle to the crown, the crown being where the paint stops, right where it goes into the headset. It's a little tricky to measure, I use a string) and report back.

    Same basic principle applies to all of your components. Nobody wants to waste money of course, but if you dig building bikes, it's OK to buy decent stuff that you'll move from frame to frame. That's true for cranks, some people get really attached to their crankset and keep it for years. Or brakes, you can always press a BB7 into service somewhere. So as we move forward, let us know where you're willing to make and investment, and where you want to save money. Baby steps first of course.

    Get a caliper. You can get a plastic one at harbor freight for about ten bucks. We will be doing some measurements.

  7. #7
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    something else to consider- there is a good chance this bike has a freewheel and not a cassette. with a cassette, you can slide spacers onto the freehub so that the cog ends up lining up with the front chainring. with a freewheel, you can only screw a freewheel on in one localtion and it will not line up with the front chaining, resulting in a noisy drivetrain that wears down chainring teeth and throws chains a lot.

    also, hubs with freewheels are notorious for snapping axles in half because the bearings are not supported on the drive side.

    it would be possible to re-space the rear wheel so the freewheel will line up better with the front chainring, but that is Jedi-level wheel building stuff and probably not worth the time considering the quality of the rim and hub you are using. your best bet is to replace the rear wheel and crankset.

    you must REALLY like this frame because, in the end, you are going to spend 4x more on this than you would on a decent new or used SS mtb.

  8. #8
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    It would be easier to just buy a set of take offs that someone is selling for cheap and the wheelset would probably be better than what's on there anyways.

    I read some reviews on this bike and from what people say...brakes would probably be a wise investment as well. A set of Avid BB5's would be pretty inexpensive and work nicely. BB7's even better.
    Kona Big Unit SS
    Kona Private Jake SSCX
    DiamondBack Release 3
    Norco Torrent HT 7.1

  9. #9
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    @ turtle: that's a good point. No harm in taking it apart to see what he's up against. It does after a while start making those old 800 series Treks look like a good starting point eh. Oh snap, there's one right down the road from my house... I should buy that sucker. Oh wait a minute... raleigh m20 with horizontal dropouts.. is that dr hanger removeable? Oh double snap

    If op is looking for mission creep, he's come to the right place

  10. #10
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    Thanks Dave sure will . This will be my first build I'm green as fresh cut grass. Lol.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    something else to consider- there is a good chance this bike has a freewheel and not a cassette. with a cassette, you can slide spacers onto the freehub so that the cog ends up lining up with the front chainring. with a freewheel, you can only screw a freewheel on in one localtion and it will not line up with the front chaining, resulting in a noisy drivetrain that wears down chainring teeth and throws chains a lot.

    also, hubs with freewheels are notorious for snapping axles in half because the bearings are not supported on the drive side.

    it would be possible to re-space the rear wheel so the freewheel will line up better with the front chainring, but that is Jedi-level wheel building stuff and probably not worth the time considering the quality of the rim and hub you are using. your best bet is to replace the rear wheel and crankset.

    you must REALLY like this frame because, in the end, you are going to spend 4x more on this than you would on a decent new or used SS mtb.
    Yes sir I do. And yes it will cost that plus some. Lol

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    It would be easier to just buy a set of take offs that someone is selling for cheap and the wheelset would probably be better than what's on there anyways.

    I read some reviews on this bike and from what people say...brakes would probably be a wise investment as well. A set of Avid BB5's would be pretty inexpensive and work nicely. BB7's even better.
    Thanks for the info .

  13. #13
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    Jenson had some nice M610 cranks on sale recently (< $100). It came with the bottom bracket. You'll need a chain ring to put on the middle position of the crank with short stack chain ring bolts.

    Get a set of BB7 brakes and matching Avid single digit 7 levers and a jagwire brake set.

    As far as the rear wheel goes, I bet that is a freehub type, you'll need a cog (I recommend surly) and spacers. You'll also need a tensioner to take up the chain slack. Make sure the tensioner pushes up on the chain from the bottom.

    You can get a Salsa cromoto rigid fork. Have your local bike shop measure and cut it for you. If you're not sure how long the steer tube should be, then make it exactly the same length as your existing fork.

    I would start by striping the bike down completely to the frame, then slowly build it back up as a SS (using the parts listed above).


    Check out this post:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/singlespeed/s...on-737354.html

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjphillips View Post
    Jenson had some nice M610 cranks on sale recently (< $100). It came with the bottom bracket. You'll need a chain ring to put on the middle position of the crank with short stack chain ring bolts.

    Get a set of BB7 brakes and matching Avid single digit 7 levers and a jagwire brake set.

    As far as the rear wheel goes, I bet that is a freehub type, you'll need a cog (I recommend surly) and spacers. You'll also need a tensioner to take up the chain slack. Make sure the tensioner pushes up on the chain from the bottom.

    You can get a Salsa cromoto rigid fork. Have your local bike shop measure and cut it for you. If you're not sure how long the steer tube should be, then make it exactly the same length as your existing fork.

    I would start by striping the bike down completely to the frame, then slowly build it back up as a SS (using the parts listed above).


    Check out this post:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/singlespeed/s...on-737354.html

    Thanks for the info

  15. #15
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    Measure the axle-to-crown length of the fork that's on there. That'll help us recommend a rigid fork, although I would agree, the salsa is a brilliant design compromise and will work most of the time. I love the somafab forks with their tapered, curved blades but you gotta know which one to get; same with the Surly 1x1 forks.

    I think your crank rings are attached with bolts, right? So all you really need are some single-stack chainring bolts (cheap on ebay). Take everything off except for the middle ring, that'll be a good start. Easiest to do this if you have a chainring bolt wrench, also cheap on ebay. While you're there, pick up a 3/32 KMC half link.

    To take your cranks off, you'll need a crank puller. I like the park tools cwp-7. You'll probably also need a pedal wrench, although look and see if you can get them off with a hex wrench. Note the left pedal unscrews backwards, lefty tighty. (Extra credit: who came up with this idea?)

    You can use your derailleur as a chain tensioner if you're unable to find a "magic gear" that'll let you run without one. Way I would do it is, space your cog way out and try to get the derailleur lined up using the H screw (look it up.) If you do it that way, you'll probably want to move the middle ring to the outside of the cranks, where the big ring is now.

    If that doesn't work, there's a way of rigging up a short segment of wire to tension the dr closer to the center of the hub. There's a post somewhere around here that says how to do it, I've never tried it.

  16. #16
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    Tampa Dave it measures 19 1/4 " crown to axles

  17. #17
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    OK so it's probably a 29er 80mm fork. So a soma 465mm or a salsa 468 chromoly forks would work, I think they are both nice-looking forks, daughter is running soma and it's really nice.

    Kona P2 fork is cheaper but read the reviews.

    Surly forks will give you clearance for wider tires up front if you're thinking along those lines.

    You'll need to get the crown race off your old fork. Can be re-used if the races aren't pitted. This is where you don't want to watch youtube, search these forums. Don't just try to whack it off with a screwdriver and a hammer, just tap tap tap to wedge a blade in there, work slow and it'll come right off.

  18. #18
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    Thanks Tampa

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