Modern (2016) Opinion of Rigid Fork on Jabberwocky- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    eri
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    Modern (2016) Opinion of Rigid Fork on Jabberwocky

    Hi All,

    Right after seeing Ben Shaklee destroy the capitol forest 100 course record on a rigid single speed, I sort of fell into a used singlespeed bike of my own and I'm really liking it. Fun how it turns boring rides back into desperate excitement. I'm looking forward to re-conquering some old hills this winter. The current aches make me think it is pretty good for me.

    The bike is a 2014 jabberwocky with a 100mm marzocchi 320 lr fork. I actually love the ride, very smooth, but bike is pretty heavy and while I can get the front up over stuff when I need to but can't seem to manual at all. Chalk it up to the chainstays I guess.

    So, the point of the post: I see the niner carbon 9mm qr fork is $175 on jenson. I could get an adapter for my hubs, that is a very cheap way to drop ~3 pounds off the bike. Its 470mm height is perfect for the jabberwocky.

    I see lots of posts from the distant past (2011) about rigid forks, but not much these days. Lots of posts where people sell their forks.

    I know this all depends on where I ride but is there a modern consensus on using a rigid fork with the jabberwocky? Anyone made the switch to rigid and is still happy years later? Is a used 15mm rdo fork a better investment?

    I figure if Ben can zoom that capitol forest course with rigid there is a lot I can learn riding my normal tamer training routes.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    No jabberwocky here, but I love my Niner rigid fork (15mm thru axle) on my 2015 carbon Stumpjumper. No worries, I'm about 200lbs geared up and the fork can take a hit, hard enough to hear it vibrating, but is comfortable enough to ride for hours. I'm new to SS and new to rigid, and it's been great so far!
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  3. #3
    Downcountry AF
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    Carver makes a few different carbon forks that would work with either QR or TA in the 470 range.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

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    I have that fork on my Sir9 and it's bullet proof. You'll notice the jared feeling at first but as you get used to it then you'll notice how precise the steering is, as you thread the needle through ribbons of narrow single track.Ergon grips helps but the most relief is with a i30 rim and fat tires. I run Velocity Blunt 35's with Han Damf 2.35 tires. The rims are soft and suck as a rear rim but up front they work great with tire pressure @ 16-20PSI.
    Last edited by hardmtnbiker; 09-04-2016 at 09:02 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    I know this all depends on where I ride but is there a modern consensus on using a rigid fork with the jabberwocky? Anyone made the switch to rigid and is still happy years later?
    If you're asking if there's a consensus about which is better on the VJ, rigid or suspended, no, I don't believe there's one. Works well either way, and there are plenty of SS frames I would NOT say that about. I think the Jab has always been offered with a matching rigid fork designed in-house (470mm length initially, now 480) or suspension (80-100 initially, now 100-120).

    Rigid SS is a hoot. Especially if it's not you're only bike.

    Niner forks are a solid choice, especially at that price. I paid ~$500 for my 9mm QR soon after released, still using/loving it.

  6. #6
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    You may want to see if the fork can clear a plus sized tire. A rigid fork with a three inch tire is a pretty nice combination--my suspension fork hasn't seen use in at least two years.
    http://www.bikingtoplay.blogspot.com/
    RIGID, not "ridged" or "ridgid"
    PEDAL, not "peddle." Unless you're selling stuff

  7. #7
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1 View Post
    If you're asking if there's a consensus about which is better on the VJ, rigid or suspended, no, I don't believe there's one. Works well either way, and there are plenty of SS frames I would NOT say that about. I think the Jab has always been offered with a matching rigid fork designed in-house (470mm length initially, now 480) or suspension (80-100 initially, now 100-120).

    Rigid SS is a hoot. Especially if it's not you're only bike.

    Niner forks are a solid choice, especially at that price. I paid ~$500 for my 9mm QR soon after released, still using/loving it.
    Thanks Ryder.

    I read that other folks also have trouble manualling the jabberwocky. Right now I hang back and raise/unweight the front wheel to go across rough stuff (across ditches and up steps) on my FS bike. I'm a bit worried what will happen if I hit that stuff at speed on a rigid fork and I can't manual. Then again maybe jabberwocky manualing becomes easier when you lose 3 lbs off the front?

  8. #8
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    If you have the original design, yeah, the chainstays are longish, which can make manualing more challenging. You'll have to mess around with your bike to see what works best for you. You can try getting the dropouts as forward as possible (via gear choice and/or half-link), raise the stem, shorten the stem, lighter fork, bigger front tire.

  9. #9
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1 View Post
    If you have the original design, yeah, the chainstays are longish, which can make manualing more challenging. You'll have to mess around with your bike to see what works best for you. You can try getting the dropouts as forward as possible (via gear choice and/or half-link), raise the stem, shorten the stem, lighter fork, bigger front tire.
    Derived and computed my chain length, with my current 32:22 ratio I'm stuck with 48.9links, 17.7x inch chainstays. The long stays and no dropper, I'm still having a heck of a time manualling but getting better? I hope? As an experiment I rode with the fork locked out and scared myself - I missed the manual and just about went over the bars in a bad place (into the cut ends of some cut 6' diameter logs.) I'm going to stay away from the rigid for now until I get a better handle on the bike.

  10. #10
    eri
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    To close the loop, or at least my part in the story:

    I bought a used kona raijin and sold the jabberwocky. I paid $600 more for the raijin than I sold the jabber for. The raijin has *all* the handling I expect from a bike, and then more. Instant wheelies, manuals, etc, etc. On steep climbs I can balance the front wheel about 1/2" off the ground. It came with a 120mm fork and I absolutely love it. I'll ride down anything on that bike.

    Believe it or not the jabberwocky had a more pleasant ride, terrific zing of steel, is really charming, but it just wasn't a good match for the trails I live to ride. On smooth trails the jabberwocky is lovely.

    Rigid or suspension didn't fall into the equation. Now I know what I need the longer fork is it. Glad I didn't get the rigid fork.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy View Post
    You may want to see if the fork can clear a plus sized tire. A rigid fork with a three inch tire is a pretty nice combination--my suspension fork hasn't seen use in at least two years.
    Yessssss.Modern (2016) Opinion of Rigid Fork on Jabberwocky-img_20161008_144417.jpg
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  12. #12
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    That's a Niner fork, any rubbing, ever?

    and what model of tire? I've always been bad at tread pattern recognition.

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    Took it (the wheel and tire) out for it's maiden voyage. It's a Maxxis Chronicle 29 x 3.0 on a Mulefut 50 rim.

    No rubbing at all. And I tried to ride as aggressively as possible (probably not as aggressively as most).

    It hooks up awesome in the corners but it does take extra effort to turn. I was trying to see if I could use this in a 6 hour race but it looks like I'm going to go to a more conventional setup and use a SID fork. It's awesome for regular, local riding though!
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    Sorry for the PM should have kept looking at posts

    Quote Originally Posted by joshhan View Post
    Took it (the wheel and tire) out for it's maiden voyage. It's a Maxxis Chronicle 29 x 3.0 on a Mulefut 50 rim.

    No rubbing at all. And I tried to ride as aggressively as possible (probably not as aggressively as most).

    It hooks up awesome in the corners but it does take extra effort to turn. I was trying to see if I could use this in a 6 hour race but it looks like I'm going to go to a more conventional setup and use a SID fork. It's awesome for regular, local riding though!
    Do you know the width on that wheel. Inner Diameter?

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    No worries, will post for everyone's info:

    50mm outer width
    45mm inner width
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshhan View Post
    No worries, will post for everyone's info:

    50mm outer width
    45mm inner width
    Good Deal!!! Thanks

  17. #17
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    I have a 2009 Jabberwocky. It's been set up rigid SS, rigid geared, front susp SS and geared, and with 29+ both rigid and front susp.
    Now it is my commuter bike with rigid and 2" Schwalbe touring tires.
    The bike works really well however it is set up, just know the tradeoffs of each setup.

  18. #18
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    I've put 3" Surly Dirt Wizards on and they clear the carbon Niner fork from 4 years ago. The non-RDO with 9MM QR drops. I run Hadley hubs with s 100x9 TA so feels pretty much like a 100x15 QR.
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