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Thread: In the market

  1. #1
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    In the market

    It's been a while since I've bought a new mountain bike. The last one I built up was a Spot 26" Well, I had the opportunity to ride a 29er this past summer and was sold immediately. I've been out of the loop on new SS technology for some time. My spot has horizontal dropouts of course. My first ride on it, I realized I was going to have to install chain tugs. At 6'4" and over two hundred pounds, the wheels just would not stay put when I was honking up a hill. I'm hoping to get away from that kind of set up because it makes for fixing a flat while on the trail a pain in the arse. Drop a nut or a tug in the dirt or grass, and one can spend a while looking for it. I've been lucky and not had to fix a rear flat in a race yet.

    So far, what I've seen is the EBB, sliding dropouts, and of course the White Industries eccentric hub. What else is there? What are the pros and cons of each? What would work best for somebody of my stature.

    Oh yeah, I'm leaning towards steel. The Spot sold me on that. What a sweet ride it is.

    Thanks!

    Sincerely

    Tim
    "There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword, the other is by debt."
    -John Adams 1753-1826

  2. #2
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    Every one will have their own professional opinion about which method works best and truthfully they all work pretty good. Going steel will give you the most options. I would go with a EBB either setscrew type (Torque wrench highly recommended on day 1 as not to stretch the shell. Not as much of an issue on steel as it is Ti) Or bushenell type EBB if the builder is good then there are very few creeks that can develop with the newer versions.

    As for steel builders or even production you need to start considering what you want now as it is getting late in the build season for some components. Lead times are going to peek in April and won't be able to get some items for a few months after. Just something to consider if you want to ride when the snow thaws

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelinTim
    ... EBB, sliding dropouts, and of course the White Industries eccentric hub. What else is there? ...
    That's about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelinTim
    ... What are the pros and cons of each? ...
    I'm probably not qualified to say exactly, not having owned a frame with sliding dropouts nor having used a White Ind. eccentric hub, but I'll tell you what I believe.

    Personally, I prefer disc brakes on my bikes. Being rather an@l retentive, I think a chain tensioning system that allows the distance between rear axle and brake caliper to remain constant is optimum. In order for this to happen the chain must either be tensioned at the bottom bracket or employ a rear wheel tensioning system that allows the caliper to move with the rear axle; this is the reason I prefer either an EBB or sliding dropouts over horizontal track ends. I've heard of EBBs that creak or sieze and I've heard of sliding dropouts that slip -- mostly on this board, not in real life experience on the trail. There are lots of singlespeeders in our local mountain bike club (The Disciples of Dirt) with perhaps an equal sprinkling of EBBs and sliders within the group. Amongst the guys I ride with -- many avid singlespeeders who do their own wrenching -- neither system has left anyone complaining.

    I do service my [pinch bolt] EBB at least a couple times a year. I use anti-seize as opposed to grease. It has never slipped nor creaked in the five years I've owned it. I got hamfisted a few years ago and snapped a pinch fitting off the shell when the frame was still young. My framebuilder had to repair this.

    I'm not sold on expanding wedge-type EBBs inasmuch as it seems like they seize more often than other types. Perhaps their service interval should be increased over pinch or set-screw type EBBs.

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelinTim
    ... What would work best for somebody of my stature...
    I'm 6'3", 190#. I love my EBB and would buy another EBB frame if something happend to my current sled. But I would only buy from a builder who was proficient at building EBB frames. I'd also consider a frame with sliding dropouts; I just don't think sliders look quite as clean as an EBB. If indeed I bought a frame with sliding dropouts, I'd get the kind with rearward-facing screws that eliminate the possibility of axle slippage.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  4. #4
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    Thank you but...

    This is all great advice. I went to the Spot website but couldn't tell what kind of adjustment is on their new bikes. I couldn't find it in the description either. Do they give you a choice? I sent them an e-mail but don't expect to hear back from them before tomorrow. Not that that's an issue, I doubt I'll get a reply here before tomorrow a.m. either.

    Who builds a good steel 29er with the sliding dropouts? What about those building with an EBB? I prefer to support those frame builders who shun overseas outsourcing. Without them, where would we be? Even my road bike is a Titus.

    Tim
    "There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword, the other is by debt."
    -John Adams 1753-1826

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelinTim
    ... I doubt I'll get a reply here before tomorrow a.m. either.

    Who builds a good steel 29er with the sliding dropouts? What about those building with an EBB? I prefer to support those frame builders who shun overseas outsourcing. ...
    Not having been in the market for a new frame in the past 5 years, I'm not sure exactly who offers what.

    Your original post did not ask for the names of frame manufacturers identified by chain tensioning system, nor did your post give the impression that you are in a hurry for the information.

    I recommend you start a new thread requesting the names of North American built 29er frames that incorporate either EBB or sliding dropouts. Best of luck with the thread title. Perhaps cross-posting the 29er board is a good idea, too.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelinTim
    Who builds a good steel 29er with the sliding dropouts? What about those building with an EBB? I prefer to support those frame builders who shun overseas outsourcing.
    Boy that is a can-o-worms question and everyone is going to have their own opinion.

    Sliders - would contact Tony over a Pereira cycles
    EBB - Quite a few more builders and most will go both ways.
    Independent fabrication
    Strong
    Blacksheep
    Badger
    Bob Brown

    The list could keep going, but at this point it seems as if you have a fairly decent idea of what your looking for. Call a few builders up and see who is most in line with your ideals and go from there. If you need some additional direction don't hesitate to ask.

  7. #7
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    Although not steel, the Titus 11 comes in a 29" config and the dropouts are completey interchangeable between SS and geared.
    I guarantee I will never, ever be accused of bringing sexy back...

  8. #8
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    Forgot one

    Horizontal drops.

    I have used all of the different systems mentioned.

    My fave - sliders. They are just easy. Functional. Setup is easy. Tensioning is easy. And I don't give a crap about if an EBB would make my frame look "cleaner". Never noticed any difference in handling due to shorter-longer chainstays when running the sliders forward or back.

    Second - EBB. Setup is easy, but it is the only item I feel I "have" to use my torque wrench on to avoid over/under tightening as I have the set screw type. Have had creaky issues that are intermittent and have resisted attempts at fixing.

    Horizontals - PITA if using disc brakes. Most make you undo the disc to get the wheel out, unless you go custom and have a chainstay mounted disc. These are fine if using v-brakes, although you still have brake adjustment issues if you retension your chain.

    ENO - I know there are people who get them to work with discs, but for me this is another PITA. This is especially true when the first two options are soooooooooooooooo much easier.


    Builders - How about Curtlo?

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