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  1. #1
    eri
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    Lowering maintainance of chain

    Reading the latest belt drive tbread (I'm a skeptic), started thinking of alternatives.

    I remember all the street bikes in Japan had enclosed chains. Don't see why it wouldn't work for singlespeed, a simple aluminum sheet? Or send chain through a pair of tubes on its way to/from the rear cog. Just something to keep the chain from being hammered with wet trail grit.

    It would sure be nice to never need to think about chain maintenance.

    Axle drive?
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  2. #2
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    I lube the chain when it gets dry.

    That is about all I do.

    When is it dry?

    When it squeaks.

    Occasionally I check for chain growth.

    Not really hard.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  3. #3
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    I honestly don't give my chain much thought, I just have a routine that I use. I use a dry lube in dry conditions every third or fourth ride. I use a wet lube in wet conditions every third or fourth ride. I clean the chain once in awhile. I have yet to break one. (SRAM 8 or 9 speed).
    "And crawling on the planet's face, some insects called, The Human Race..."

  4. #4
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I lube the chain when it gets dry.

    That is about all I do.

    When is it dry?

    When it squeaks.

    Occasionally I check for chain growth.

    Not really hard.
    Yeah... I get it that there are places and times you can ride that don't require frequent chain maintenance.

    Right now it is rainy time in the pnw and I clean my chain after every ride, scrub with hose and brush to clear out the big woody debris, then relube with oneball (less toxic version of rock n roll extreme). Chain stays spotless and doesn't rust, it's 2 minutes every time I get home, before I put bike away.

    But I'm imagining a world when I didn't need to do that. The answer ain't some better lube, needs to be a way to keep chain from gathering leaves and sticks and being pressure washed by the rear tire.

    I guess a guard is a bad idea otherwise everyone would have one already?
    the truth is always a gift because it offers the recipient of that information the chance to change the outcome - Grace Choi

  5. #5
    eri
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    Sheldon brown calls it a 'gear case':
    https://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_g.html#gearcase

    Seems like itd be perfect for me.

    Also... I'm lucky to get 60 miles of dry mtb without relube, at most I've had 110. In the rainy muddy wet its never more than 30 miles before chain needs lube. At certain times of year the rear tire picks up cedar cones and some get scrunched into the chain.
    the truth is always a gift because it offers the recipient of that information the chance to change the outcome - Grace Choi

  6. #6
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    Yeah I posted a bunch of stuff about my belt drive bike recently. I never thought about getting a belt drive bike until one walked into my life.

    While the concept of belt drive is beautiful the execution is only slightly less so; that's what I think. As for efficiency, my impression is that if it is less efficient, I can't really feel it.

    The only problem I have, so far, is with the sound it makes sometimes. It's much quieter than a coasting Chris King hub, but it's totally annoying when it happens. Noise is energy - energy being lost, (not what you want to hear climbing your ass off)!

  7. #7
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Burns View Post
    Yeah I posted a bunch of stuff about my belt drive bike recently. I never thought about getting a belt drive bike until one walked into my life.

    While the concept of belt drive is beautiful the execution is only slightly less so; that's what I think. As for efficiency, my impression is that if it is less efficient, I can't really feel it.

    The only problem I have, so far, is with the sound it makes sometimes. It's much quieter than a coasting Chris King hub, but it's totally annoying when it happens. Noise is energy - energy bring lost!

    Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk
    Youíre a belt user (victim) so Iíd especially like to hear your thoughts... why not keep the chain but protect it from the environment? Is that just too simple?

    I just donít see why belt it preferable to an enclosure. I bet an enclosure could look terrific and be removable for racing.

    Just need some frame mounts I guess. Or band clamps?
    the truth is always a gift because it offers the recipient of that information the chance to change the outcome - Grace Choi

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    ...
    But I'm imagining a world when I didn't need to do that. ..?
    Arizona...
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  9. #9
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    This thread is about chain maintenance, and belt drive discussion is superfluous.

    Chains are excellent and can be quiet as a mouse as well.

    The idea of fabricating a chain case for our single speeds is an excellent one. The main drawback I see is when it inevitably gets out of alignment. Perhaps some sort of self centering mechanism could be contrived.

    However the beautiful open drive train is simple and free from the extra weight of a chain enclosure.

    In the early years of cycling Major Taylor successfully campaigned on a shaft driven bike.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
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    I ride in North Vancouver/Squamish all year, it gets just nasty in the winter/wet season.

    Same routine all year long...Hose the bike after every ride with a garden hose. Dry with a dirty old towel. Couple drops of triflow on the chain right before the next ride starts. If it gets a little loose I pull back the dropouts to take up the slack. I don't think it gets easier than that.
    One of the main benefits of riding single speed, especially if you ride all year where it's wet and gross. No gears and pulleys and skinny chains and fancy lubes for different conditions, etc.. to fuss over.

    I will add I get down to ride in Arizona once a year and my bike is cleaner after my whole trip than it is after I wash my bike up here! You guys got some fun stuff down there!
    @adamalphabet

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Addy Marx View Post
    I ride in North Vancouver/Squamish all year, it gets just nasty in the winter/wet season.

    Same routine all year long...Hose the bike after every ride with a garden hose. Dry with a dirty old towel. Couple drops of triflow on the chain right before the next ride starts. If it gets a little loose I pull back the dropouts to take up the slack. I don't think it gets easier than that.
    One of the main benefits of riding single speed, especially if you ride all year where it's wet and gross. No gears and pulleys and skinny chains and fancy lubes for different conditions, etc.. to fuss over.

    I will add I get down to ride in Arizona once a year and my bike is cleaner after my whole trip than it is after I wash my bike up here! You guys got some fun stuff down there!
    i started changing out my chain once a week and takes little time. I dump the dirty chain in a degreaser and later it sits in an oil bath. Blow and wipe off the excess and I am good to go. Sparkling clean chain once a week. Reduces wear, quiet and looks great on my Unpainted Ti HT.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    i started changing out my chain once a week and takes little time. I dump the dirty chain in a degreaser and later it sits in an oil bath. Blow and wipe off the excess and I am good to go. Sparkling clean chain once a week. Reduces wear, quiet and looks great on my Unpainted Ti HT.
    That is actually a great idea! Thanks!
    "And crawling on the planet's face, some insects called, The Human Race..."

  13. #13
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    how hard is chain maintenance? a few drops of lube, wipe clean with rag. it takes 30 seconds. let's talk about making something easier that matters, like getting all those little Velcro seeds off your favorite socks.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    how hard is chain maintenance? a few drops of lube, wipe clean with rag. it takes 30 seconds. let's talk about making something easier that matters, like getting all those little Velcro seeds off your favorite socks.
    yes, that is one method of cleaning your chain but it does little to remove the dirt inside the chain. So you get more wear on the chain, cassette and crank. How much more? I do not know but with my cassettes costing near 400 USD and light weight chains and cranks not cheap either, I need to keep my equipment in service for as long as possible. Besides, I like the look, sound and shift ability of a clean chain.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    how hard is chain maintenance? a few drops of lube, wipe clean with rag. it takes 30 seconds. let's talk about making something easier that matters, like getting all those little Velcro seeds off your favorite socks.
    Wear your dirty socks like slippers and then toss em. Buy some Bombus socks and never look back. On your left...Safe Travels!

  16. #16
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    SRAM chains are $12. I'd rather replace my chain every week than have some goofy looking contraption on my chainstays to keep mud off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeedSteven View Post
    SRAM chains are $12. I'd rather replace my chain every week than have some goofy looking contraption on my chainstays to keep mud off.
    oh I agree, naked chain for me but......my chains cost between 40-70 USD a pop.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    yes, that is one method of cleaning your chain but it does little to remove the dirt inside the chain. So you get more wear on the chain, cassette and crank. How much more? I do not know but with my cassettes costing near 400 USD...
    First, flushing the chain with lube does a pretty darn good job of getting grit out if you do it right. Lube, lube some more, watch excess oil drive grit out, wipe clean. No need for anything more than that.

    Second, what's this "cassette" you speak of? What forum do you think you're in? My "cassettes" last for hundreds of miles and cost less than 30 bucks.

    Why are you using $70 chains?

  19. #19
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    Sealed shaft drives been around since turn of last century, probably died at the altar of the weight weenies
    Canfield Riot SS
    ROS9+ SS
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    GT Peace 9R SS

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    First, flushing the chain with lube does a pretty darn good job of getting grit out if you do it right. Lube, lube some more, watch excess oil drive grit out, wipe clean. No need for anything more than that.

    Second, what's this "cassette" you speak of? What forum do you think you're in? My "cassettes" last for hundreds of miles and cost less than 30 bucks.

    Why are you using $70 chains?
    SRAM X-Dome XG 1199 10x42 hard to find for less than 300 USD. Usually much more. I like super light chains. My preference is a KMC X11SL. You can flush out much of the dirt like you stated. But after you do all that, run a clean cloth over your chain and it will get dirty fast. I used that method for years but it you want real clean, take that dirty snake off the bike and clean it properly imho.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    SRAM X-Dome XG 1199 10x42 blah blah blah blah
    I guess you didn't pick up on my first hint. This is the Singlespeed forum.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    SRAM X-Dome XG 1199 10x42 hard to find for less than 300 USD. Usually much more. I like super light chains. My preference is a KMC X11SL. You can flush out much of the dirt like you stated. But after you do all that, run a clean cloth over your chain and it will get dirty fast. I used that method for years but it you want real clean, take that dirty snake off the bike and clean it properly imho.
    How often do you replace the quick link?
    By continuing to browse my posts, you agree to send me cookies.

  23. #23
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    [QUOTE=mack_turtle;13887258]I guess you didn't pick up on my first hint. This is the Singlespeed forum.[/QUOT

    I was asked what cassette and I responded. Chain Maintenance same for one speed to 12. Makes no difference. WTH. .

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    How often do you replace the quick link?
    i
    About 4 times a year. I keep two on hand in a link removal tool I carry. Very handy devise.

  25. #25
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    Man, you guys do a lot of work.

    I leave my chain alone until it looks REALLY dusty and actually feels dry to the touch. Then I'll drip some Phil Tenacious Oil on a rag and wipe the chain until lit looks cleanish and wet again. Seems to work for me, and I only change chains out once per season or so.

    I have never liked the feel of a chain after you've dripped lube directly on it, or degreased it and re-lubed. It always feels different to me.

  26. #26
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    Even on my geared bike (Yes that same 10-42 $300 cassette) I lube the chain when it makes noise. I got 5000+ miles from my old XT 9spd cassette and have probably 1500 on my 1195 cassette.

    I never remove my chain to clean it. Heck I never clean it. Just wipe it down if is really dusty or got wet and relube. Same for Geared or SS.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  27. #27
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    the problem with adding any new gizmos to a singlespeed is that it takes away from the beautiful simplicity.

    lube chain, wipedown, ride till the chain gets funky, repeat...

    i honestly doubt you meticulous cleaners get many more miles but who knows. some people need a clean bike; so long as mine works well i'm good. but if a clean chain gets you on the bike clean away!

  28. #28
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    KMC 8.93 Chains... $9.99 on JensonUSA. Wipe down after each ride, remove and soak every month or so, replace after 1500 miles. Cheap and easy.

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