Love or hate front suspension on your SS?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Love or hate front suspension on your SS?

    Love my rigid Monkey, but after a 2 hour ride through chunk, I feel beaten up.

    I'm considering getting a SS 29'er frame that is compatible with a 120mm fork. Anyone else done this? Will I miss the immediate power transfer and lack of flex from a rigid bike? Is 120mm overkill? Are you happy with 80 or 100mm?

  2. #2
    Rohloff
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    Fully rigid is just too rough for me on the trails I ride. I'm currently on a FS SS with a Reba XX with XLoc Remote. I found 100mm up front was the sweet spot with me. I like the remote lockout on the fork for SSing.

  3. #3
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    I like a 100mm suspension fork with handlebar lockout. Perfection.

    --sParty

    P.S. I ride rigid half the year as well. But this is because I don't want to submit my suspension fork to Oregon's brutal elements, not because I don't value the benefit of having a handlebar-mounted switch to flip my suspension on or off whenever I want to.

    P.P.S. Let your frame design dictate the length of sus fork you choose.
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  4. #4
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    Why not just run a suspended fork on the monkey?

    I have a hardtail I ride when I don't want to get beat up, but I will throw a suspension fork on the monkey when/if I ever get rid of my Cinder Cone.

  5. #5
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    I agree. I hate to run suspension, but it's necessary for longer rides. I do like the idea of a remote lock-out.
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  6. #6
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    80 mm reba has worked well for me.

  7. #7
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    i go both ways.

    when i get bored i change it up, then i go play in the mud.
    Last edited by veloreality; 11-28-2010 at 11:38 AM.

  8. #8
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    Just get a suspension fork. I like mine a lot for the long hard rides during the summer. Once winter sets in, it is a good time to go rigid. Remote lockout would be nice- mine is on the fork crown and rarely gets flipped.

  9. #9
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    it really is rider preference. in my opinion, single speed bikes are all about simplicity, light weight, and low maintenance. why pay a lot money for something that will increase the weight of your bike and will be out dated in a couple of years?

    i am not sure how trails are around you, but the trails that i often ride are not a problem on a rigid fork as long as you can pick a good line.

  10. #10
    Cthulhu fhtagn
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    i like the rigid fork on my ss for the power transfer but if i had a fork with lockout on the handle bar that i think would be pretty nice
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  11. #11
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    I love my Fox fork much more than my rigid fork. My favorite thing about mountain biking is blasting downhill and the rigid fork results in a lot of pain when bombing rocky downhills at speed. You can pick a smoother line, but not a smooth one. The rigid steers better, is lighter, and less maintenance. But that is far outweighed by the ability to go smokin' fast with the suspension fork and not feel like my flesh is going to be ripped from my bones and my eyeballs are going to be jarred out of my head.

    I don't get tomatoSS's comment though. Why would a suspension fork be outdated in a few years and why would you care? If your fork works now, it will work in a few years regardless if new ones get better.

  12. #12
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    I don't have the pop loc on my reba but i use my loc out frequently. Only time it can be a little dicey is while beginning a descent on narrow ST taking my eye off the trail for a split second to put my hand on the top right crown to release the loc out!

  13. #13
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    I'm running a Fox RLC on my Soulcraft Holy Roller SS, which I really like for smoothing out the trail on longer rides, and for rockier descents.

    However, I am still planning to build up another Vassago SS, as a full rigid because alot of the trails I ride around here aren't too rocky. I just really like the simplicity, precision and climbing capabilities afforded by full rigid SS.

  14. #14
    Rohloff
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    I don't get the comments about maintenance associated with a suspension fork. I understand disliking gears and maybe even all those creaky rear suspension pivots, but suspension forks require very little maintenance. Maybe a once a year once over.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdc
    I don't get the comments about maintenance associated with a suspension fork. I understand disliking gears and maybe even all those creaky rear suspension pivots, but suspension forks require very little maintenance. Maybe a once a year once over.
    And I have an R7, which isn't too much heavier than my steel fork in any case.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thor29
    I don't get tomatoSS's comment though. Why would a suspension fork be outdated in a few years and why would you care? If your fork works now, it will work in a few years regardless if new ones get better.
    for example, the rock shox judy fork. back in the day it was a pretty decent fork. now they have much lighter forks that perform quite a bit better. the same thing is going to happen with the nice forks of today. they are almost as bad as electronics. a few years from now they will be out dated junk. as i said in my post, it just comes down to rider preference.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomatoSS
    for example, the rock shox judy fork. back in the day it was a pretty decent fork. now they have much lighter forks that perform quite a bit better. the same thing is going to happen with the nice forks of today. they are almost as bad as electronics. a few years from now they will be out dated junk. as i said in my post, it just comes down to rider preference.
    Rigid forks became 'outdated' in the early 90's.

  18. #18
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    unless you ride butter smooth trails, you will not miss your rigid fork. i have a rigid fork from a worshipped builder mentioned a few posts up, along with a frame from the worshipped builder a few posts up. i rode it for a good two years on all sorts of terrain here in Texas until my wrists and elbows really started bothering me. put a reba 80mm on the frame from the worshipped builder mentioned a few posts up and could not be happier.

  19. #19
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    Does the thread agree this is a totally valid reason to build an entire SS with a suspension fork? Winter time project season is comin up....

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justinbunyon
    Does the thread agree this is a totally valid reason to build an entire SS with a suspension fork? Winter time project season is comin up....
    I wouldn't subject a suspension fork to PNW winter weather / conditions because (1) suspension is not needed in sloppy, oozy, muddy conditions and (2) such conditions will rip up the innards of the suspension fork in short order. A rigid fork will pay for itself in one season and personally, I prefer a rigid fork under such mooshy conditions anyway.

    But when the high country opens up in summer and rides become epic and descents are long and speeds are high... bring on the suspension fork, baby.

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justinbunyon
    Does the thread agree this is a totally valid reason to build an entire SS with a suspension fork? Winter time project season is comin up....
    Nope? I am just not man enough to hack rigid dry weather rides in excess of 2 hours. If I could, I would, but I'm probably faster down with a suspension fork, too... choices, choices...

  22. #22
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    Yup...for me anyway. The more I ride rigid(new this year) the more I see that it has its place on some trails and not on others be it summer dry or winter mush. Here the baby head rocks are year round, and they make up a big part of the trails I ride. I like the lightness and simplicity of rigid SS (who doesn't) but see the need for something with some cushion the other half of the time. Maybe just reaching down for the lockout works, but I don't want to complicate my "simple" ride, and like I said before I believe it a valid reason for a winter build project... I started mine last week.

  23. #23
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    Paid My Dues

    Rode rigid gear bikes from 1973 to 2000. I am 42, blue collar and done with rigid (except for schwinn bar bike!) 80mm on Niner SIR 9 not enough so switched to 100mm last month-perfection. 120mm on squish bike GT works great ( at collecting dust). Put old 80mm on parts bike for winter and still is too stiff -and not FIT. Anyway, 26 to 35 year old guys still ride rigid with no problems and they save $. Ahhhh, the youth is wasted on the young ( I wish I were tougher )

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoolie
    Anyway, 26 to 35 year old guys still ride rigid with no problems and they save $.
    Some stupid 55 to 60 year old guys do too

  25. #25
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    Suspension is just not my cup of tea.

    Maybe I am just too stupid to handle one, I hate the bobbing/rebound/bounce thing. It's kinda annoying that something other than my hand cause my steer to move.

  26. #26
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    I've been running the rigid fork on my ss inbred 29er for a few years now. Like many it was a love/hate relationship. I finally decided it was time....and ordered a 100mm suspension fork for it. Should arrive in a week or so.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  27. #27
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    I'm happy with a 2.4 tubeless front at squish psi and a steel fork. Prefer it to sus. Improved power transfer and trail feel for me.

  28. #28
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    I love my Fox F29 on my Jabber. I run it at 80mm- handles a little better than at 100mm. I had a Rig with the fork at 100 and it was smooth and handled well.

  29. #29
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    Sometimes I need a reason to drink beer & wrench in the garage. Other times I just need to mix things up a bit... that's why I use both regularly. My travel adjustable coil fork is quite versatile in that regard as well.

  30. #30
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    I don't think there has been one post that relates to where you live being a deciding factor in whether or not you ride rigid.
    Some here in Phoenix do, most DON'T.
    The rocks here will pound you to death if you ride alot full rigid. Some will disagree, but count the number of SS's with front suspension vs. rigid in the parking lots and trail heads and you will see.

  31. #31
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    Just picked up a rigid muss this weekend and rode it for the first time Sunday, got no complaints. Planning on building a set of 650b's to go on it but gotta say I loved the responsiveness of no suspension.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Just get a suspension fork. I like mine a lot for the long hard rides during the summer. Once winter sets in, it is a good time to go rigid. Remote lockout would be nice- mine is on the fork crown and rarely gets flipped.
    i can't imagine an SS fork without a handlebar lockout...i use it like a shifter

    i think rigid is more fun, but it hurts...a lot... and is really slow in a group situation, so i switch back and forth depending on the planned ride (it's a 2 beer job after all)
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    i think rigid is more fun, but it hurts...a lot... and is really slow in a group situation, so i switch back and forth depending on the planned ride (it's a 2 beer job after all)
    I can go down hill on my rigid fork faster then any of the people I normally ride with.

    Would I be able to go faster with a shock? Hard to say. I have a geared bike with a shock and don't think I go any faster on it. Yes, my hands hurt less, but they still hurt. The only good thing is that it hurts less when you mess up on line choice.

    I also hate every shock that I have been on except an old Palmer signature model.
    All the newer ones that I have rode move too much and every air fork I have owned will leak.

    If I need a reason to drink beer by working on my bike, I just tighten the spokes that come loose after every ride.

    And as far as the length of rides, a normal ride is 2+ hours.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by gatman
    I can go down hill on my rigid fork faster then any of the people I normally ride with.
    I'm with you on that, but I can go even faster with a suspension fork. The line is King with a rigid fork, but with the suspension I often get to a crest, eye the way down for a moment before saying, "**** it."

    This was my first full summer with front suspension and I crashed more than ever.

  35. #35
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    Equal opportunity hater of suspension forks for SS or geared bikes. I do ride in the midwest though, so the trails are a lot less brutal..but I am 52 so theres a balance there somewhere.

  36. #36
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    I have found there are pros and cons with a front shock, just like there are with riding gears or SS.

    I pick the options that give me the cons that I can live with most.
    Just like riding a SS puts a bigger smile on my face then my geared bike, I prefer the rigid for for steering and climbing over the extra plushness that I would have on the down hills.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    This was my first full summer with front suspension and I crashed more than ever.
    This is the reason I like rigid better. Since I get more feedback from the trail, I find that I can ride on the edge a lot of the time without going too far over and getting dangerous with crashes. If I had a sussy fork, I would probably go faster than I wanted to since I lose touch with the trail. I don't really want to crash, and rigid lets me have a fun and exciting ride every time.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by gatman
    I have found there are pros and cons with a front shock, just like there are with riding gears or SS.

    I pick the options that give me the cons that I can live with most.
    Just like riding a SS puts a bigger smile on my face then my geared bike, I prefer the rigid for for steering and climbing over the extra plushness that I would have on the down hills.
    I agree, I realize that I smile more when I ride SS compare to gears.

    Now I regret that instead of shifting why I don't try to push/spin harder. Now I learn to pedal in better way both in low and high rpm.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomatoSS
    it really is rider preference. in my opinion, single speed bikes are all about simplicity, light weight, and low maintenance. why pay a lot money for something that will increase the weight of your bike and will be out dated in a couple of years?
    That may have been true in the nineties, but forks development has reached a plateau, and you needn't worry about them becoming outdated. For example, a Fox fork from 2003 is still a good performer today.

    Suspension forks allow me to enjoy downhills more (and I love downhills), and allow me to make a mistake without getting bitten. Also, I just don't want that wear on my hands. Properly set up it's acceptable climbing, and I always have lockout if it'll be a long hill. Nope, a suspension fork is worth every penny to me, and none of my mountain bikes will be without one.

    But then again, I have a FS single speed along with my hardtail single speed...

  40. #40
    Rohloff
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    That may have been true in the nineties, but forks development has reached a plateau, and you needn't worry about them becoming outdated. For example, a Fox fork from 2003 is still a good performer today.

    Suspension forks allow me to enjoy downhills more (and I love downhills), and allow me to make a mistake without getting bitten. Also, I just don't want that wear on my hands. Properly set up it's acceptable climbing, and I always have lockout if it'll be a long hill. Nope, a suspension fork is worth every penny to me, and none of my mountain bikes will be without one.

    But then again, I have a FS single speed along with my hardtail single speed...
    Yea, I agree. I think there is this SS culture of anti-technology. It's cool to be against it all. I understand the simple joy of a rigid SS and some of the issues that comes with suspension and gears, but I'd have to say one of the least troublesome technologies some are trying to avoid is the suspension fork.

    Also, the need for suspension and gears varies a lot around the country. I just got back from a long trip across NM and AZ where I went on a number of buff flat trails that were VERY different from the hilly chunk I ride here in central Texas. It's difficult to read a national/international forum and get an idea what kind of gearing or suspension you need where you ride.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomatoSS
    ... why pay a lot money for something that will increase the weight of your bike ...?
    ...
    Using this logic, you could remove your saddle, seatpost, grips & one brake. Heh heh.

    Some things are worth their cost & weight. As you said, it really comes down to rider preference.

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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by pushinpixels
    Love my rigid Monkey, but after a 2 hour ride through chunk, I feel beaten up.

    I'm considering getting a SS 29'er frame that is compatible with a 120mm fork. Anyone else done this? Will I miss the immediate power transfer and lack of flex from a rigid bike? Is 120mm overkill? Are you happy with 80 or 100mm?
    C'mon now, don't be coy! Which frame are you thinking of getting?
    FWIW, 80mm Minute on my KM SS was a goddam revelation. I'm never going back. I was rigid SS for about 2 years before that, and I swore I would never go forward . Why the jump from rigid KM to new frame sporting 120mm? Surely you could compromise and put a 80-100mm fork on the KM?
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  43. #43
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    I currently have a rigid Niner carbon fork and it is stiff as hell. I'm contemplating selling it and using the money towards a Reba XX with the lockout. That seems to be the ideal set-up. Rigid is fun, but for longer, technical rides with some gnarly decents, suspension is definitely faster. I recall a time last year where I went on a group ride with a bunch of guys. I was able to hang for most of the ride but once I hit this 400meter uber rooty section of the trail, I had to ease off the throttle, otherwise it was going to be too painful.
    Last edited by erichwic; 12-09-2010 at 04:58 PM.

  44. #44
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    I'm running 140mm revs on my ss although i have them locked out most the time when commuting. I've got a poploc so can lock out on the fly. Don't think i would get on with rigids using the bike for it's proper purpose!

  45. #45
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    I'm a bit of a schizo about my rigid fork (SE Stout since July 23) on any given ride i go through the love it hate it debate about every 10 minutes.
    I am using a Weirwolf 2.55 tire at ridiculously low pressure and have a set of foam grips made by Ritchey

  46. #46
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    120mm is good!

    I ride a 26" Ti hardtail with geometry corrected for a 120mm fork (Reba Team 120mm with Maxle). (I have a full rigid SS steel hardtail as well)

    For the technical decents we have in So Cal I always wanted a little more suspension than 100mm. My 100mm fork with the appropriate sag just felt like there was not quite enough travel left. 120mm is a great compromise for me. The bike still climbs great even without locking it out.

    I am not sure

    It is totally a matter of taste and what "feel" you want the bike to have, and I am not sure how my experience translates to a 29er, but I will throw in a vote that 120mm on a hardtail is a killer setup.

  47. #47
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    I really want to persist with my fully rigid SS but its getting to the stage that i feel i need the squishy fork , i absolutely love it of climbing but i reckon on techy stuff with my big volume tyres twanging and spitting stones it would be better for me . I have a reba XX sitting here and i reckon the rigid forks days are numbered , the remote lock out is a god send on long climbs.... weight difference, yes i carry 15kg a handicap round my waist (slugs his beer) , an extra kg V comfort wont really matter.
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  48. #48
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    One thing to really watch for if you go to suspension is the feeling of having the front wheel disappear underneath you when you come down on the other side of obstacles, going down steps or bottoming out in gullies or ditches. I have grown to hate that feeling and much prefer the feel of a rigid fork in these situations. Sure you get beaten up over long rides, but isn't it fun to feel like you're hanging on through rounds 12-15 of a prize fight?
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    That may have been true in the nineties, but forks development has reached a plateau, and you needn't worry about them becoming outdated. For example, a Fox fork from 2003 is still a good performer today....
    Agreed. My '03 Talas that I eventually had rebuilt by Push was, for the most part, still on par with most new forks out there IMO. Only reason I sold it a couple months ago was all my bikes are 29ers now and it was a 26 fork.
    No way this 40+ yr old would go with a rigid fork on either of my 29ers on the CO Front Range trails I ride. I couldn't imagine doing any of my endurance races w/o front susp. My hardtail beats me up enough after 6+ hrs in the saddle.
    BTW - I love the remote lock out on my Reba's and wouldn't go w/o. I use it all the time. 2008 Reba on my HT and 2010 Reba XX on my Racer-x
    Last edited by MSH; 12-01-2010 at 12:02 PM.

  50. #50
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    2011 Reba XX here and love it. The remote lock out gives me the best of both worlds. 100mm travel as well. No more than that.

  51. #51
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    I am currently on a White Brother Rock Solid. I love the fork and it is about half the weight of my old Rock Shox Psylo that I was running. There was nothing wrong with my Psylo other than its weight. But I also wanted to build up a bike for my wife. The bottom line is that I didn't and still don't have some $600 to shell out for a Fox. It is just ridiculous how much fs costs these days. I am also a little reluctant to buy a used one simply because I don't know enough about rebuilding them nor do I really trust what someone else that is selling it to me is saying. I'm sure I could probably have found a decent shock for the same price as my Rock Solid but I am quite happy with my set up at this point. The trails I ride allow for me to get away with a rigid though I can say that I am probably more fatigued after longer rides than someone that was on fs.

  52. #52
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    The power transfer of rigid is great, its actually hard to imagine what it would be like trying to mash up steep climbs with squish. And its a lot of fun to negotiate the trail more tediously. But, on rough stuff when I get around 25mph, I'm rattling around to the point that my vision gets a little blurry and then it just gets scary. I'm putting a bigger front wheel on next week, maybe that will help.

    A fork with lockout sounds great, but pricey. I have a non-lockout fork on my susp bike, so I'll just make do a little longer.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1SPD
    It is just ridiculous how much fs costs these days.
    Manitou makes an affordable fork. Just sayin'. I picked up a Minute 80mm for my KM last year for around $300 new and delivered. Bang > Buck.
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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob_co2
    The power transfer of rigid is great, its actually hard to imagine what it would be like trying to mash up steep climbs with squish. And its a lot of fun to negotiate the trail more tediously. But, on rough stuff when I get around 25mph..
    Nitpicking time. Fun never equals tedious. Rough stuff + ~25mph+ Rigid = never happened.

    Anywho, I think we can all agree on is that rigid has its place in the SS world, and is certainly something one should do on a regular basis.

    The other thing is that front suspension is ****ing awesome and can be had inexpensively. I'm hating the idea that I'm about to reveal something to you retards, but Manitou R7 can be had for around 200 bucks on ebay. It is light, works ****ing fantastic and is cheap. It even has lock out, so you can have fairly efficient climbs if you are a big enough ***** that you can't suck up a mild loss of efficiency.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Nitpicking time. Fun never equals tedious. Rough stuff + ~25mph+ Rigid = never happened.

    Anywho, I think we can all agree on is that rigid has its place in the SS world, and is certainly something one should do on a regular basis.

    The other thing is that front suspension is ****ing awesome and can be had inexpensively. I'm hating the idea that I'm about to reveal something to you retards, but Manitou R7 can be had for around 200 bucks on ebay. It is light, works ****ing fantastic and is cheap. It even has lock out, so you can have fairly efficient climbs if you are a big enough ***** that you can't suck up a mild loss of efficiency.
    Huh. When I read, "nitpicking time" I figured fur shur you were going to take him to task for saying 'wheel' when he meant 'tire.' Of course he may actually mean wheel... he might be turning a 26er into a 96er...

    Whatever. Back on track... I bought my 100mm Reba w/remote lockout for $289 (prior year's model on blowout). It's one of the best suspension forks I've ever owned.

    Now this tidbit. I'm not keeping score, honestly I'm not, but lots of folks call it a 'shock' or a 'shock fork.' It's a suspension fork. A shock is at the other end of the bicycle. Not that anyone reading didn't already know this.

    --sParty
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  56. #56
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    Ok tedious was a bad choice of word, guess I meant meticulous. The point is, its more of a challenge to ride rigid (vs suspension) and that makes it more fun in many cases.
    The downside is you have to slow down sometimes. When I'm flying down a fast/smooth downhill and it suddenly turns rooty (in which case I would not be looking down at my speed, so I'm guesstimating and probably exaggerating a little for emphasis), I will sometimes try to hit it at full speed but then get jarred around and nearly lose control, whereas on my softail I'll usually add a couple pedal strokes.

    I'm currently running a 26x2.35 tubeless freeride tire and that helps a ton, dont think I would ride rigid with less tire than that. I just ordered a 650b front wheel and wolverine, I hope that helps me corner and descend a little better. Total cost is only about $100 shipped, it shouldnt add much weight, and it will not increase pedal bob. The last suspension fork I got cost me $50 but no lockout, I'll wait until one of my forks dies before I consider upgrading.

  57. #57
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    surviving single speed is all about energy expenditure.
    if you can conserve the momentum you have then you have more energy to keep going.
    if you popcorn in the first hour, you've no energy left to pedal, you're toast.
    if you're spinning semi slicks on mud and not going anywhere, you're wasting energy which isn't aiding forward motion, and you're toast.
    if you're lugging 40 pounds of klunker with a flexy frame and you don't have the cardio for it, you're energy is being expended twisting the frame and carrying more weight, you're toast
    and if your body and bike keep getting their momentum slowed or stopped due to impacts and rough terrain...

    balance whether the tiny difference in your bike's power transfer cancels out the loss of momentum when slamming over obstacles. then you'll know which one you want to ride.
    (or get a damn lockout fork and have it all)

    /end rant

    my 1x1 doesn't have a fork yet, but winter's coming, so i might put one on soon. (stuff hiding under snow tends to grab my front wheel)
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  58. #58
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    I'm generally a point and shoot person, so I don't like to pick the smoothest line so a shock is forgiving.

    My winter bike is rigid and I pay for it with all the ice bumps on the trail I get a lot of chatter.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  59. #59
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    Rigid SS 29ers make great cyclocross bikes too!

  60. #60
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    I have one SS bike with a suspension fork (w/lock out) and two SS bikes that are rigid (2 -26, 1 650B). To me it becomes an issue of effort. My Rocklobster with a Marzocchi Atom 100 is effortless but heavy (26 lbs). My rigid Bontrager is light (19 lbs) but can beat me up if I go too fast; my SASS 650B is somewhere in the middle with 2.35 tubeless Nevegal tires. Going rigid makes old rides new but will slow you down. I have also found you need to reacquaint yourself with suspension fork dive after riding rigid for a while; on slow technical descents the rear end gets to be awful light.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  61. #61
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    Gotta be patient for deals

    The "last years model" is my achilles heel for sure. I also like to torture myself with buyers remorse by shopping after I get a sweet deal. I love front suspension forks. Buy a Fox, Reba, or Manitou on sale and ride it! Upgrade or sell for a fair price if needed. Enjoy the process, its all bike stuff and it is a cool addiction while you can do it.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Now this tidbit. I'm not keeping score, honestly I'm not, but lots of folks call it a 'shock' or a 'shock fork.' It's a suspension fork. A shock is at the other end of the bicycle. Not that anyone reading didn't already know this.

    --sParty
    I was going to say much the same thing, but didn't because I'd have just come across as some arsey, pedantic guy from the wrong side of the Atlantic .
    Which I am, of course (except the "wrong" side of the Atlantic bit)

  63. #63
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    Thanks for the entertaining thread! Front suspension with lockout sounds like the best compromise. Rigid fork goes into retirement this spring *snif*

  64. #64
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    I prefer my 26 rigid to my front suspended 1x9 Niner. I have a "big Earl" 2.5 on front and it offers enough cushion for a two hour ride. For anything longer, a little cushion would be nice. Anybody have a Girvin flex stem for a 1 1/8 fork?

  65. #65
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    I ride a Fox Fit RLC up front and run it really stiff. Stiff enough and with enough rebound control that on the climbs it doesn't dive (that I can notice), but will add some compliance on the flats and downhills. I really dislike a squishy front end.. Feels like it's going to fold under me at speed.

  66. #66
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    Any of you ever heard of bunny hopping, J hopping? Whatever you want to call it, it's bike handling Did I mention it was free? Put me in the anti squish camp. I live in NW Arkansas..far from flat and smooth. A fork is not technology, as some would like to believe, or at least convince themselves. It cannot do two things at once, provide a platform for vertical forces(your weight), and be compliant at the same time. Hence the lockout. Ride what you like, I like durability and predictability. Besides, it leaves more of a budget for trips and guitar stuff
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  67. #67
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    That is the attidude I miss

    As stated in earlier post I have been in the trades 25 yrs and body is worked! I really am jealous of riders on rigid carbon forks ( or steel ). I did 2 rides on used Niner w/ awesome Pace fork, took lots of asprin and sold the fork. Back to fox and save all kinds of cash on Asprin. Rode steel forks in Chico on volcanic, ridiculously bumpy trails for 5 yrs. in my 20's and now I pay the price. But I am still pretty fast when I ride with guys slower than me. HA ha , oooo, WHATEVER. I like to ride my bike!

  68. #68
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    I was fully rigid until I broke a rib when my chain snapped on a steep out of the saddle climb and my chest ate the bar. I was forced to ride the geared dually while I healed. When I was feeling a little better I tried rigid and the rib got bad again. I decided to invest in a white bros magic 110. It works as advertised and I was able to ride the SS again. I ended up selling my rigid fork. The front suspension allows me to ride longer and with less pain. It made SSing much more enjoyable for me. I rode rigid in the nineties, I didnt like it then, I dont know why I thought I would like it now. Bottom line, ride what works for you.

    Now I have a very angry dually, it gives me the evil eye every time I walk past it, it wants to be dirty not dusty.

    JMC
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  69. #69
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    mo0se: Any of you ever heard of bunny hopping, J hopping? Whatever you want to call it, it's bike handling Did I mention it was free?

    If you need to bunny hop it, a fork won't help!

    I prefer rigid riding and I can still handle it for now, but I think the ideal arrangement would be a light suspension fork with lockout.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SS
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  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMCCRNA
    I was fully rigid until I broke a rib when my chain snapped on a steep out of the saddle climb and my chest ate the bar. I was forced to ride the geared dually while I healed. When I was feeling a little better I tried rigid and the rib got bad again. I decided to invest in a white bros magic 110. It works as advertised and I was able to ride the SS again. I ended up selling my rigid fork. The front suspension allows me to ride longer and with less pain. It made SSing much more enjoyable for me. I rode rigid in the nineties, I didnt like it then, I dont know why I thought I would like it now. Bottom line, ride what works for you.

    Now I have a very angry dually, it gives me the evil eye every time I walk past it, it wants to be dirty not dusty.

    JMC
    Ouch! That makes me cringe just thinking about it!

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by floxy
    Ouch! That makes me cringe just thinking about it!
    I know, I relive it every time I do that climb and my chest twinges just a bit to remind me
    2011 S works SS 29er
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  72. #72
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    When you give in, your done! Plain and simple.
    I'm young at 44 and ride like in 20. If you think, " I can't", then you can't, and your done. Start Knitting. If you think you are strong, you are strong. Kick that hills a$$. It will hurt a little. That's good. Enjoy it. It's more fun than knitting.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by henrymiller1
    When you give in, your done! Plain and simple.
    I'm young at 44 and ride like in 20. If you think, " I can't", then you can't, and your done. Start Knitting. If you think you are strong, you are strong. Kick that hills a$$. It will hurt a little. That's good. Enjoy it. It's more fun than knitting.
    You will be assimilated. Resistance is futile.

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  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Now this tidbit. I'm not keeping score, honestly I'm not, but lots of folks call it a 'shock' or a 'shock fork.' It's a suspension fork. A shock is at the other end of the bicycle. Not that anyone reading didn't already know this.
    --sParty
    Unless you have been riding since the early 90's and then the shock was on the front of the bike.

    Chicks want rigid, not squish.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    ...... I'm about to reveal something to you retards, but Manitou R7 can be had for around 200 bucks on ebay. It is light, works ****ing fantastic and is cheap.
    Don't know about you but $200 has never been cheap to me. And as far as maintenance, more complexity will always equate to a higher chance of component failure. I ride a steel rigid with v-brakes. Love it and it works for my riding. However, that's my commuter-do-it-all tank that rarely goes on anything too technical. BUT if I was going down a steep trail with roots or rocks I'd want - disc wheels mated to fat tubeless tires with a quality susp. fork keeping it all on the ground (I can't do much with my wheel in the air and my head swaying like a bobble toy, I've tried.)

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