Looking for a do-everything SS/fixie frame- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    @adelorenzo
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    Looking for a do-everything SS/fixie frame

    Hey All,

    I'm working on upgrading my current SS commuter to a fix/free. It is an old Miyata 1000 touring frame with a 'magic gear' that I ride on everything from pavement to singletrack. My plan was to braze on some track ends and do some upgrades to the bike.

    However, when I rode it to work this morning, it feels too small for me now that I actually have a mountain bike that fits me right. It's got a good height but about 2 inches shorter in the top tube than my MTB -- not good, especially since I want to switch from a flat bar to a swept-back bar. I'm thinking about replacing the frame with something else.

    This bike is for commuting, off-roading, and some SS touring as well.

    What I need is either a cross frame or a touring frame with good tire clearance. I want these specific features:
    - horizontal (or near) top tube -- needs to look like a roadie
    - track ends (no dropouts)
    - as much tire clearance as possible: cross tires or even skinny knobbies
    - canti posts and rear rack braze-ons
    - strong steel frame for a big clyde
    - low price

    I'm not picky or anything.

    Anyways, here are some I have looked at:
    Surly Cross-Check: Exactly what I want but the track ends, could add them
    Surly Karate Monkey: Got one already, otherwise a great choice.
    Redline Monocog 29er: Awesome price, downside is too MTB-looking. Clyde-worthy?
    Redline Conquest: No track ends, could add them. Clyde-worthy?
    Soma Double Cross: Same as Redline Conquest

    So, thoughts? Is there a frame out there that I am missing in my consideration?

    Option B is to get a new 29er frame, like the monocog, and then use the KM for this project. Ah, decisions...

    Regards,
    Anthony

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    The Cross Check doesn't have true track ends, but the semi-horizontals function nearly the same way.

  3. #3
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    Something to think about.

    Depending on crime in the area I would use the cheaper build for commuting. The Karate monkey (since you already have one) would be a perfect option. It has fender and rack mounts if you decide to go that route plus you can even go geared. Its not to expensive so crying will be limited if it gets stolen, and it is D U R A B L E (AKA reliable). This way you can give yourself a good excuse to spend more money on your new dedicated off road machine. Good luck.

  4. #4
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    why do you not like the crosscheck dropouts... IMHO those are even better than track droputs cause you can change a wheel with fenders on your bike.

  5. #5
    @adelorenzo
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    Crime and dropouts

    Thanks for the replies.

    My usual city bike philosophy is ride no bike worth anything, or at least appears to be worth anything. Thankfully, where I live now street theft is basically a non-issue. I would guess that 90% of bikes stolen are break-and-enter, while the other 10% happen at the high schools. I can get away with leaving my bike outside with nothing but a small frame lock, and it has some higher-end stealable stuff on it.

    You need to have a 3000+ bike to make it worth stealing, or either that or a garage full of nic bikes. The nearest market for stolen **** is about 2000 km away. Selling a stolen bike, or even parts, around town would be very difficult. It helps that half a dozen of the most diehard riders around here are RCMP.

    Anyways, I digress, but value of the frame isn't an issue so much as my budget.

    I could live with the non-track ends on the Cross-Check frame, I guess. It is a Surly and it also happens to come in the color (dark green) that I planned to paint the old frame.

    I just plain like the track ends, it is going to be sort of a retro bike: brooks sprung saddle, north road bar, classic saddle bag, that sort of thing. Plus I have a Tugnutt lying around looking for a purpose in life.

    Regards,
    Anthony

  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    The Rivendell Quickbeam fits the bill -- except for that pesky "low price" part.

    On-One Pompino with P-clamp mounted rack?

  7. #7
    @adelorenzo
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    The Rivendell Quickbeam fits the bill -- except for that pesky "low price" part. On-One Pompino with P-clamp mounted rack?
    Quickbeam would be perfect, your're right. Too much $$$. I hadn't considered the Pompino, but it has what I need and the price is definitely right. That might be the deal right there.

    57 cm seems a little small for me though, considering I was looking at a 62 cm cross check. The top tube is pretty long though, I'll have to measure it against my current frame.

    Regards,
    Anthony

  8. #8
    blame me for missed rides
    Reputation: weather's Avatar
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    cheaper option: IRO rob roy

  9. #9
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    Here is a cheap track frame

    http://store.somafab.com/pacrtrfr.html

    Its not a Soma. I have seen these in person. No frills but not to bad.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    cross check

    I actually prefer the cross check angled dropouts to the normal (level) track ends. The benefit is that you don't have to adjust the pads when you change the gearing. This is was a HUGE win in day2day week2week life.

    Also the cross check can fit big tires. Before mine was stolen I'd had firecross 45's, irc mythos 42's and schwalbe big apple 50's in there. The Pake' listed above can barley get a 28...

    just my 2 cents

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Didn't know

    Wasn't sure about tire clearance on the Pake. Just throwing out other options. I had a cross check. Good solid bike for a fair price.

  12. #12
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    Another vote here for you to take a look at the Rob Roy.

  13. #13
    I am the owl
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    Get over the idea that you need track ends and look at the Cross-check. It meets all of your criteria and will serve you well.

    SingleSpeedOutlaw .com
    Riding Bikes and Drinking Beer.

  14. #14
    @adelorenzo
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    Quote Originally Posted by riderx
    Get over the idea that you need track ends and look at the Cross-check. It meets all of your criteria and will serve you well.
    I definitely don't need track ends, I just like 'em... But, you are right. I'm a huge fan of Surly stuff. I do like the Pompino and the IRO, but both are very hard to get up here where I live. I know someone who can bring in Surly frames, so I think that ease of obtaining one is going to push the Surly over the top, I think.

    Sweet ride. That is basically the exact bike I am going for, ss/fixie on/off-road tourer/commuter. I planning to ride moustache bars also.

    Regards,
    Anthony

  15. #15
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    I have a cross-check SS as my commuter- it is my go-to bike for my day-to-day riding, it sees singletrack, and chews up fire roads and rail-trails. The only other frame I would consider for this type of riding would be the on-one ilPompino. I do know for sure that I can run pretty much whatever cross tire I want, so I have a range from 30mm to 40mm in my house depending on the seasons (narrower for summers, fatter when it gets nasty)

  16. #16
    meh... whatever
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    another vote for the cross-check. its just what youre looking for.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  17. #17
    dirty hippy mountainbiker
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    Check out the bianchi San Jose (good thread in this forum back a ways). Track ends, rack mounts, bla bla bla, it has lowrider mounts in the front. I ride trail on mine, gonna hit it on the way home. Got a rack and run panniers sometimes, loaded cargo a lot. Fixie, Crossie, Pub Stunts, trackstands, back-flips, and so many hotties I can't swing a dead cat.

    -M

    ps some hyperbole in there, but generally an accurate (and precise) statement.
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  18. #18
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy
    Check out the bianchi San Jose
    good do all bike UNLESS one wants to run fenders. rear has to come off to remove the wheel on the jose. the fork is also a tad flimsier than the crosscheck... 'specially for cydes.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  19. #19
    dirty hippy mountainbiker
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    I run phenderz no prob. If you have to carry around a 15 mm wrench for the wheel chances are you have a 3mm hex for the fender mounts too.

    -M
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  20. #20
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy
    I run phenderz no prob. If you have to carry around a 15 mm wrench for the wheel chances are you have a 3mm hex for the fender mounts too.

    -M
    didnt say it was a prob, just that it has to be done. no rack & pans and its a snap, but if running loaded pans it then becomes a REAL inconvienence.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  21. #21
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    I was thinking of converting my crown jewel to singlespeed for commuting on. What kind of gearing do you guys ride? I am in NE GA so it's hilly but there aren't any death march climbs.

  22. #22
    dirty hippy mountainbiker
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    42 x 15 fixed for slicks (32c)
    42 x 17 for knobies and dirt (without much climbing)(35c)

    175mm cranks.

    Hills are fine, but you got to stay on top of them, especially with sneakers and toe-cages.

    -M
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  23. #23
    @adelorenzo
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucifer
    I was thinking of converting my crown jewel to singlespeed for commuting on. What kind of gearing do you guys ride? I am in NE GA so it's hilly but there aren't any death march climbs.
    My current SS commuter is a 40x18, which is overall pretty nice for riding a relaxed pace in street clothes.

    Based on that, I've spec'ed the new bike for 36x16 fixed and 36x18 freewheel. The fixed gear will be for commuting -- my daily commute is 3-5 km each way, mostly flat, and depending on which way I go includes roads, paved and non-paved trails and singletrack -- and the freewheel will be for more aggressive terrain, hilly road rides, or just when I'm tired or lazy.

    I realize most people ride taller gears on a fixie, but I'm not really into going fast and I want to be able to ride on and off road. This is my first time trying it though, so I may end up going a different route once I have some experience with the setup.

    Regards,
    Anthony

  24. #24
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    Thanks
    I was thinking about 2.5 to 1 but I may come down a bit from there to start off.

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