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Thread: Long Climbs

  1. #1
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    Long Climbs

    I've been reading the various posts about climbing and knee pain. Most say the best thing to do is stand to climb. Is this true for long climbs? Do you stand for the whole climb, assuming it's steep grade?

    I'm debating between 32:18 and 32:20. I assume I want 32:18 if I'm going to be standing for most climbing. I've had lots of knee problems so I want to do whatever technique is best in that regard.

    What is the most effective technique for standing climbing? Do you run a low psi to keep traction?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfpriest
    I've been reading the various posts about climbing and knee pain. Most say the best thing to do is stand to climb. Is this true for long climbs? Do you stand for the whole climb, assuming it's steep grade?

    I'm debating between 32:18 and 32:20. I assume I want 32:18 if I'm going to be standing for most climbing. I've had lots of knee problems so I want to do whatever technique is best in that regard.

    What is the most effective technique for standing climbing? Do you run a low psi to keep traction?

    Thanks

    Try to carry as much speed up the hill as possible.
    Pick a smooth line
    Use those riser bars to your advantage

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfpriest
    I've been reading the various posts about climbing and knee pain. Most say the best thing to do is stand to climb. Is this true for long climbs? Do you stand for the whole climb, assuming it's steep grade?

    I'm debating between 32:18 and 32:20. I assume I want 32:18 if I'm going to be standing for most climbing. I've had lots of knee problems so I want to do whatever technique is best in that regard.

    What is the most effective technique for standing climbing? Do you run a low psi to keep traction?

    Thanks
    Alternate standing and climbing. If you can get a decent tempo sitting, sitting is the most efficient. Get out of the saddle when it becomes too much to bear sitting or if you need a break. Knee pain hasn't been a problem for me since I stopped running over 20 years ago. I run the same pressure geared or s/s. With an s/s you could actually run higher pressure because you won't have the traction issues that you would have on a geared bike trying to climb something loose in a granny gear. A s/s puts the power down to the tires better.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfpriest
    What is the most effective technique for standing climbing? Do you run a low psi to keep traction?

    Thanks
    How tall are you? More important, what is your inseam measurement and what length cranks are you using? You might find that longer cranks are easier on your knees. Here are a couple links you might find helpful in this regard:

    http://www.nettally.com/palmk/crankset.html
    http://www.velonews.com/tech/report/...es/5257.0.html

    Personally I am tall with long arms and legs. Even though my bikes have top tubes over 25" long, I much prefer wide flat bars with bar ends to riser bars. The bar ends allow my bike's cockpit to expand when I stand up, plus I prefer the hand position of the forward-pointing bar ends while standing (and sometimes sitting).

    For good traction, whether geared or SS, give me a frame with short chainstays.

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  5. #5
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    upper body

    One of the untold benefits of the ss choice is a better workout for the entire body. Sit until you have to stand then get up on the peddles and use the upper body leverage on the bars. Transfer that energy down to the hammers clipped to your soles. If you skate ski, if you swim, waterski etc. you know how important the torso is in being powerful. Get it all involved - efficiently. Think big muscles do the heavy lifting then down to the smaller - like wrists and hands. Ass, abdomen, chest, lower back, shoulders will get you to the top.

    That and the bungee cord visualization.

    Then get a beer, grasshopper.

  6. #6
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    regarding the gear ratio: when in doubt, go lower.

    someone on this board gave this tip like a year ago: still do the pulling with your other leg when you stand up, think of it as if you are trying to keep your foot horizontal all the time.

  7. #7
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    I'm 5'7" with a 29-30" inseam. I'm getting the 17.5" S.A.S.S. Not sure what the crankarm length is. I wanted to build up (with the help of the LBS) a Surly 1x1 with an EBB but it would have cost more, had rim brakes and probaby be heavier.

    I understand that a longer crankarm gives you more leverage. Many on this list keep saying it's good for the knees but everything I've read says a longer crankarm is harder on the knees. You can't spin as much and it forces your knee into a sharper angle at the top of the stroke.

  8. #8
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    hey surfP

    lets ride. I ride Tam on my SS all the time. I just sold my BASS but my custom TET should be up and running in may.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfpriest
    I understand that a longer crankarm gives you more leverage. Many on this list keep saying it's good for the knees but everything I've read says a longer crankarm is harder on the knees. You can't spin as much and it forces your knee into a sharper angle at the top of the stroke.
    The possibility of using a too-long crankset also exists. The knee problems you describe can be attributed to using cranks that are too long. Cranks appropriate to the length of your legs are the ones you should use.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  10. #10
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    Great

    Quote Originally Posted by Zenfrog
    lets ride. I ride Tam on my SS all the time. I just sold my BASS but my custom TET should be up and running in may.
    I just sent you a PM. I'd love to ride sometime.

  11. #11
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    Have you tried...

    the 15.5 SASS? FWIW I'm also 5'7'' with a 32'' inseam and I found the 17.5 SISS kinda long. For SSing, the 15.5 frame felt like it gave me better control through fast and twisty stuff and on climbs. The newer Bianchi SS bikes tend to have a longer top tube than other bikes with the same seatpost measurement (similar to the Gary Fisher Genesis geometry). Just a thought...

    Quote Originally Posted by Surfpriest
    I'm 5'7" with a 29-30" inseam. I'm getting the 17.5" S.A.S.S. Not sure what the crankarm length is. I wanted to build up (with the help of the LBS) a Surly 1x1 with an EBB but it would have cost more, had rim brakes and probaby be heavier.

    I understand that a longer crankarm gives you more leverage. Many on this list keep saying it's good for the knees but everything I've read says a longer crankarm is harder on the knees. You can't spin as much and it forces your knee into a sharper angle at the top of the stroke.

  12. #12
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    too much weight forward

    I rode the 15.5 frame around (just on the streets) and it felt like I was supporting most of my weight on the handlebars. There wasn't an equal distribution. I rode it twice but only for five min or so. I was assuming/hoping that the 15.5 would work for me because it would be more manuverable like you describe and I could get last years model at a good discount. The LBS guys watched my position on it and suggested the 17.5. One of them was about the same size as me and says he rides the 17.5.

    I wonder what impact the frame size has on climbing?

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