locking out my front fork more each ride.- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: playdead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    748

    locking out my front fork more each ride.

    I know there's tons of threads about this and most of you are going to say, "go rigid!" Which I thought was a crazy idea especially in my neck of the woods in the past, but I find myself locking out my front fork 85% of my time on the trail. I end up doing it more and more each time I go riding.

    The reason why I'm holding back is because I feel like having front suspension over really bumpy sections with roots and rocks is faster. Yeah, a rigid fork will force you to pick better line ups, but I still go for those line ups with my front suspension.

    But...

    After riding today I thought to myself, "am I about to go rigid?!"

    Something I thought was crazy in the past, but is starting to make sense now.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,313
    Yeah, go rigid! I got there the same way. Fork was always locked up and the rigid fork was a lot lighter. In fact, a nice steel fork has a lot more flex than a locked out rigid fork.
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  3. #3
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
    Reputation: nuck_chorris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,809
    if you go rigid , get a carbon fork and report back to me( i want to know about the feel)
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: njbiker66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    445
    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    if you go rigid , get a carbon fork and report back to me( i want to know about the feel)

    But what about good old Titanium.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,313
    I prefer a steel fork over a carbon one - - at least comparing an Origin 8 carbon fork to a Salsa steel fork. The carbon does dampen the trail, but it does not have as much lateral flex as a Salsa fork. But it is something you have to try for yourself.
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,018
    Used steel forks can be had for cheap, so why not? Buy one and a second crown race to match your headset and now you can not only try it out, but also switch back and forth in 15 mins if you feel like attacking a rough trail

  7. #7
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
    Reputation: nuck_chorris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,809
    Quote Originally Posted by njbiker66
    But what about good old Titanium.
    because no one mfg titanium forks that aren't custom
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    860
    In some cases suspension will be faster. No getting around that. For me, I have more fun on the rigid. My Reba on lock-out doesn't compare to the simple joy of rigid on 98% of what I ride.

    The only time I reach for the FS is days where I'll be dropping some of the rougher and more extended trails around here. Descending for 2-3 miles at speed gets painful on the rigid.
    Stache 7 --- Rigid Surly 1x1 B+ --- Dirt Drop CrossCheck

  9. #9
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,647
    I have a rigid SS and a hardtail SS. I ride the hardtail whenever I can do so and still avoid Oregon's abusive winter conditions (the wet sludge is hard on suspension components). But whenever I can't avoid the sludge, I ride the rigid, which amounts to about 7 months of the year. Rigid is great in the slop, which ruins suspension forks, but whenever conditions allow me to use my suspension fork, I'd prefer to employ it.

    Riding really fast down a serious descent... like 5-10 mile descents that include big elevation loss... no way in the world I'd prefer to do that with a rigid bike. My hands get tired enough simply squeezing the brake levers.

    --Sparty
    Last edited by Sparticus; 10-27-2009 at 06:39 AM.
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: traffic002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,938
    So I just went on a ride on my FS/geared bike this last weekend. This particular trail has quite the elevation changes and I wasn't in the mood to climb long technical climbs on the SS while everyone was in their granny gears.

    In any case, it's true that I can sit on my Rush and let the Lefty fork and rear Fox soak everything up. In fact, I found myself purposely bashing into roots and laughing.

    I will say, however, I was a bit bored. I wanted to go faster. I wanted to actually use my suspension because I needed it and not because I have it.

    I ride in the PNW, so that means year round riding. Like Sparty, the falll - spring months are wet and sloppy with wet roots and rocks and muck. The speeds are slower. The ground is softer. Perfect for less suspesion on bikes. Many have HTs they pull out for the winter to get in a better work out and keep their skills sharp.

    The advantage of suspension becomes more apparent in the summer months when the trails are dry, traction is plentiful and the speeds go way it. Even a good rider has a hard time keeping the wheels on the ground at the elevated speeds. In the winter, the advantage diminishes. And for me, it actually takes away from the fun. I don't find enjoyment in slowly rolling over all the roots and rocks versus picking my lines and dropping my front wheel anywhere I want. The precision of the front end outweighs the chatter I might otherwise have in the summer. Also the brake modulation is awesome since I don't have to worry about fork compression as part of the traction equation.

    Then there is the mashing on the pedals out of the saddle. =D Oh what fun it is to dance with my bike!
    Just get out and ride!

  11. #11
    I don't huck.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,543
    I have been thinking the same thing as I run locked out quite a bit, but I flinch big time when the fast, rocky creekbeds come along. Then I reach for the compression adjuster.

    I have always speculated that a nice steel/carbon whatever fork is actually a nicer ride then a truly locked out sussy fork since they are not supposed to flex fore and aft a great deal.

    Go rigid? Maybe one day. Maybe not.
    Blog Ramblings
    West Coast writer for twentynineinches.com

  12. #12
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,818
    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    if you go rigid , get a carbon fork and report back to me( i want to know about the feel)
    Feels like a carbon fork compared to a steel fork.



    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    681
    I'd say go rigid and add a big, squishy front tyre in case you're riding a really rough trail. There's no way I could ever ride a suspension fork again (okay, unless I were to race DH or something, but that's not the point here).

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Flat Ark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,646
    The biggest difference that I found between riding carbon vs. steel rigid forks is the weight. It's easier to lift the front end up with the carbon but I think that I prefer the less choppy feel of steel.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,236
    Quote Originally Posted by playdead
    After riding today I thought to myself, "am I about to go rigid?!"


    GIGITY!
    Last edited by AlexJK; 10-28-2009 at 06:04 PM.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: traffic002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,938
    So while riding last night at our local trails (yes, it was wet and we rode with lights) I couldn't help noticing how much more "challenging" it was with the wet roots covered in leaves so you couldn't even see them. I had to ride "lighter" than my buddies with forks. Basically stay super loose and be ready for anything.

    During the ride, we came across a couple of other riders. We chatted for a while. And one of them commented on how he wouldn't ride the trails on his Monocog Flight 29 (like mine) He complained of his wrists hurting and that he would add a fork to his ride.

    So it is not for everyone.

    For me, I rather enjoy it. I enjoy it more than my Rush currently. I'm sure if I rode my Rush a couple rides in a row, I'd get used to the full squishy again and appreciate its merits. But right now, I've dialed myself into the rigid/ss bike. The Rush feels sloppy and awkward at the moment even though it is a great handling bike. It will just stay in the dry garage until next season when the trails get faster again and we can go on longer rides.
    Just get out and ride!

  17. #17
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,818
    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Ark
    The biggest difference that I found between riding carbon vs. steel rigid forks is the weight. It's easier to lift the front end up with the carbon but I think that I prefer the less choppy feel of steel.
    I would guess that depends on the fork. I went from an On-One steel to an On-One carbon and the carbon had more vibrations dampening and does have more "give" to it. Mine does no have the "choppiness" that others mention with carbon forks. The On-One has no weight or rotor size restriction, and it is not the lightest, but I am really happy with mine.

    I switched to the carbon after a crash that broke my collarbone in four places and cracked the acromium (and an awesome bruise). When the doc finally cleared me for the dirt, I needed a little smoother ride.

    I have a fully squishy geared and the rigid SS now, and like the contrast between the two bikes; if I could only have one, it would be the rigid SS, it really owns my heart. because it is simple fun and makes me pay more attention to my riding.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gatman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    578
    I recently went rigid even though I thought I never would. The good news is I am loving every minute of it.

    I have terrible wrists and even have pain with I ride with a front shock. I thought there would be no way I could ever ride rigid. Well, I hated the shock that I had on my bike because it moved too much for me. I prefer the old school forks that only move when you hit something.

    I had tried the stock 1x1 fork in the past and could ride it, but it was much slower for me. I found a deal on a Pace carbon fork and had to try it. It is a rougher ride and will work you over on some trails. That however has not made me want to take it off. I might be a little slower going down then I could be with a fork, but I am a lot faster going up.

    Just go big on the front tire and give it a few rides. Pick good lines and keep your arms loose.
    To be honest, my wrists have not hurt as bad with the rigid as they did with my fork on the front, but I am not sure why.



    Here is a link to a video that shows I still can go down hill fast enough. Faster then the guy on a super light trying to film me.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rp7JUjQHyc

  19. #19
    Back on the wagon
    Reputation: PutAwayWet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,083
    I've been rigid for the last 5 years (and no, I haven't seen my doctor ). Riding a rigid bike requires a different set of skills than riding a suspended bike. You really have to keep your body independent of the bike. Seats are for resting on smooth flats. Arms and legs are your suspension - keep your shoulders, ellbows, ankles, knees, and hips loose. Your balance will improve - when the bike needs to go over obstacles, let it. Keep your body neutral and relaxed. The bike follows the terrain, your body follows a linear path along the trail.

    There's no doubt riding rigid IS a disadvantage on long downhills. But that's about the only time. Other than that, I like the advantages over suspension.

    I've ridden the On-One steel fork and the Vicious steel fork. The On-One was much more rigid (read: harsh), but the Vicious is buttery smooth and still tracks like it's on rails.

    FWIW, I ride in New England on rooty/rocky trails and the rigid bike has taken me everywhere the full sussers go. (maybe not the drops, and maybe not quite as fast )
    RIDE HARD, live easy.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.