It lives.... My first SS Conversion is complete- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    It lives.... My first SS Conversion is complete

    It has taken me about a month to assemble (and decide on) the parts and to give it a nice rattle can finish. Not bad for my first build. This strictly my "test the waters" type bike before I jump in with both feet for a whole new bike. It is currently set as my winter/rain bike. I can't wait to get it dirty. I have left a little slack in the chain, so I can find the ratio. Right now, I am running a 32 x 17 (I have 15 and 19t cogs as well).
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    Last edited by chrispf007; 01-10-2006 at 12:18 AM.

  2. #2
    Don't skid
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    Nice looking ride.
    Can you post some technical details? Like frame, rear hub, and unexpected probelms, or anything else. I ask because I am in the process of builing my first SS and hearing others ideas/problems helps.

    Quote Originally Posted by chrispf007
    It has taken me about a month to assemble (and decide on) the parts and to give it a nice rattle can finish. Not bad for my first build. This strictly my "test the waters" type bike before I jump in with both feet for a whole new bike. It is currently set as my winter/rain bike. I can't wait to get it dirty. I have left a little slack in the chain, so I can find the ratio. Right now, I am running a 32 x 17 (I have 15 and 19t cogs as well).
    The Revolution will not be motorized...especially at $5 per gallon.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by KONA_in_SB
    Nice looking ride.
    Can you post some technical details? Like frame, rear hub, and unexpected probelms, or anything else. I ask because I am in the process of builing my first SS and hearing others ideas/problems helps.
    The technical specs are not overally impressive. My buddy gave me his old college beater to convert. So, I started with a 1991 neon yellow w/black splatter Trek 830 Antelope. I then removed all the horrible soild lead parts, cables and most of the Shimano Exage components. My first hurrdle was the drive side of BB was seized into place, luckily I work for a bike shop and after some bloody knuckles and head scratching my head mechanic used a Stein Tool (of which I or anybody else in the shop had heard of) and finally got in out. I then sanded and spray painted the the frame and fork. I had come across a Manitou Splice fork I was going to use but, it was a130mm travel and this frame was not suspension ready. Overall, it has been a good experience. The problems I faced had more to do with my frame and LIMITED budget.

    My Specs:
    frame: 1991 Trek 830 Antelope (original)
    colors: Pewter and Black (auto spray paint)
    stem: Girvin Flex Stem (aluminum)
    headset: Shimano STX - threaded
    handlebar: Easton EA50 1 degree rise
    grips: Forte Celtic
    brakes: Forte Team V-Brakes
    brake levers: Forte Team
    saddle: Forte Men's Contour
    seatpost: Kalloy 400mm 26.2 (my only choice in black)
    bb: Shimano cartridge style
    cranks: Shimano Deore w/ 32t Chain Ring
    pedals: Forte Campus (platforms & spd)
    chain: Sachs single speed
    cogs/spacers: came from broken cassettes we had laying around
    wheels: Araya with Simano Exage Hubs (original)
    tires: Panarcer FIRE XC PRO

    Like I said not overally impressive but, a functional first SS.

  4. #4
    Obi
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    Reposition your tensioner...

    Move the tensioner so it's pushing the chain up rather than down, it'll prevent you from jumping the teeth under load. (Experienced opinion.)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by obi.one.speed.only
    Move the tensioner so it's pushing the chain up rather than down, it'll prevent you from jumping the teeth under load. (Experienced opinion.)
    Thanks for the tip. I saw the option in the instructions, but I was lazy and just went with the factory default position. I have read that pushing the chain up is a better way to go. Since we are in the middle of another week long soaking of rain, I may just have tinker a bit this weekend.

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