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  1. #1
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    knocking sound

    i've been hearing some kind of "knocking" or clicking sound on my ss. It's difficult to tell where it is...bottom bracket or freewheel. The LBS that built up my ss took a look at it and it does not seem that the bb is loose. One of the tech guys there said that it might be the freewheel and that his ss makes the same noise. Seems to happen at a higher cadence.

    Same tech said that an upgraded freewheel might solve the problem.

    Anyone else have this same type of noise?

  2. #2
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    ACS freewheel? Yes, Absolutely. Shimano? Maybe a little. White Bros.? I have know idea. I can't afford one to find out =
    Giant Trance Advanced SL0
    Black Cat 26 " SS

  3. #3
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    shimano freewheel

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    Are you sure its not the front or rear rotor rubbing funny? That is if you are running disk brakes. As I had I clicking/knocking sound that was caused by a loose wheel bearing. Which was mostly heard while turning and or picking up the cadence

  5. #5
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    My acs freewheel on my commuter does the same thing you described.

  6. #6
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    Yup, I had the dreaded ACS freewheel "knock". Nothing to worry about, just annoying.
    "I like skinny jeans. Sometimes I wear them to the mall to get an Orange Julius." -Chim Chim

  7. #7
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    When my ACS freewheel gets really dry it will do this. Take off the center cap with a spanner tool and clean/ relube your bearings and pawls in there. If you don't have a spanner tool you can just put lube around the space where the cog and freewheel meet and rotate the cog. You will slowly work the lube into the innards. It's a pain in the a$$ but it will stop the knocks. When it is full you will notice the grease coming out of the backside of the freewheel and then it should take 10-15 miles for it to loosen back up and work in the new grease.

    Edit: Before I got a spanner tool it would take me about 15-20 mins of applying lube, rotating cog, and repeating process to get it properly lubed.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crosstown Stew
    When my ACS freewheel gets really dry it will do this. Take off the center cap with a spanner tool and clean/ relube your bearings and pawls in there. If you don't have a spanner tool you can just put lube around the space where the cog and freewheel meet and rotate the cog. You will slowly work the lube into the innards. It's a pain in the a$$ but it will stop the knocks. When it is full you will notice the grease coming out of the backside of the freewheel and then it should take 10-15 miles for it to loosen back up and work in the new grease.

    Edit: Before I got a spanner tool it would take me about 15-20 mins of applying lube, rotating cog, and repeating process to get it properly lubed.
    This.

    Used to have the same issue with my old Shimano and ACS freewheels. Some people soak them in oil overnight at some point to keep them lubed and quite.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crosstown Stew
    When my ACS freewheel gets really dry it will do this. Take off the center cap with a spanner tool and clean/ relube your bearings and pawls in there. If you don't have a spanner tool you can just put lube around the space where the cog and freewheel meet and rotate the cog. You will slowly work the lube into the innards. It's a pain in the a$$ but it will stop the knocks. When it is full you will notice the grease coming out of the backside of the freewheel and then it should take 10-15 miles for it to loosen back up and work in the new grease.

    Edit: Before I got a spanner tool it would take me about 15-20 mins of applying lube, rotating cog, and repeating process to get it properly lubed.
    Just out of curiousity, how long were you able to go between servicing?
    "I like skinny jeans. Sometimes I wear them to the mall to get an Orange Julius." -Chim Chim

  10. #10
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    Paid alot for it but my WI Trials freewheel has gone almost an entire year and I done nothing but wipe off the outsides of it to get the gross debris off it. Frickn thing rocks!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by amishscum
    Just out of curiousity, how long were you able to go between servicing?
    Depends on if I ride in the rain or not but for reference I live in Central AL and don't ride in the mud too often. In the last year I serviced it 3 times over about 800 miles on mostly dusty dry conditions. One of those times was after 4 hours riding in really sloppy mud but it was due for a lube anyway.

    Similar to 1SPD, I got a WIFW last fall thinking after several years the ACS would soon give out but haven't put it own yet. Got a spanner tool over the winter and took apart the ACS freewheel couple weeks ago. Gave it a good cleaning and lube and the thing I like about the ACS is that the bearings are loose and serviceable, where as the WI freewheel is a sealed cartridge bearing and must be replaced instead of just cleaning it and relubing. I haven't done it yet but for their name and price I would hope they last a long time.

    Good luck and if you do decide to get a spanner and clean the bearings, watch out when lifting the cog over the pawls, do it over a clean table with a with napkins or something because there are I think like 30 or so loose ball bearings on each side. They should have grease on them and will be fairly sticky so they won't go bouncing off anywhere but they are small and could get easily lost. Hope this helps

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1SPD
    Paid alot for it but my WI ... freewheel ... rocks!
    Indeed. Worth every penny.

  13. #13
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    My Shimano freewheel did the same thing. I thought about servicing it, but I just bought a White freewheel instead. In nearly two years of service, it hasn't given me any issues, and hasn't needed a service yet. It's worth every penny.

  14. #14
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    ok cool..so it's the freewheel and just annoying. i can deal with that but will look to be upgrading to a homebrewed cog soon!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike A.
    ok cool..so it's the freewheel and just annoying. i can deal with that but will look to be upgrading to a homebrewed cog soon!
    ......? Homebrewed doesnt make SS freewheels.
    He does make SS cogs which slide onto a cassette body, but it sounds like you have a screw on freewheel
    I repair Carbon Fiber frames.
    http://twobrotherscycleworks.blogspot.com/

  16. #16
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    oh! i guess I do. it's a spot brand single speed hub and the freewheel does screw on I guess. so what would an upgrade from a $26 shimano be?

  17. #17
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    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/166...p=065%20WISEF7

    The only one you will ever need. Fully rebuild able. But you probably wont ever need to rebuild it. I have close to 3000 miles on mine without touching it. I have the trials version. Slightly pricier but you get more points of engagement.
    I repair Carbon Fiber frames.
    http://twobrotherscycleworks.blogspot.com/

  18. #18
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    hmmmm - i would have to change out my chain ring too...if i go white bros in the back, I might as well go white bros chainring too, eh? right now i'm running a 34 / 17 set up and i don't see a 17t white bros free wheel

  19. #19
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    white industries!

  20. #20
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    Shimano and ACS will knock...

    Eventually, pony up for the White Industries and your knocking will cease.
    Went through a few cheapo freewheels until I got that, especially if you ride in rain/winter.
    Even if you clean/drown them in oil they will knock.

  21. #21
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Crosstown Stew
    Depends on if I ride in the rain or not but for reference I live in Central AL and don't ride in the mud too often. In the last year I serviced it 3 times over about 800 miles on mostly dusty dry conditions. One of those times was after 4 hours riding in really sloppy mud but it was due for a lube anyway.

    Similar to 1SPD, I got a WIFW last fall thinking after several years the ACS would soon give out but haven't put it own yet. Got a spanner tool over the winter and took apart the ACS freewheel couple weeks ago. Gave it a good cleaning and lube and the thing I like about the ACS is that the bearings are loose and serviceable, where as the WI freewheel is a sealed cartridge bearing and must be replaced instead of just cleaning it and relubing. I haven't done it yet but for their name and price I would hope they last a long time.

    Good luck and if you do decide to get a spanner and clean the bearings, watch out when lifting the cog over the pawls, do it over a clean table with a with napkins or something because there are I think like 30 or so loose ball bearings on each side. They should have grease on them and will be fairly sticky so they won't go bouncing off anywhere but they are small and could get easily lost. Hope this helps
    Thanks for taking the time, this is good info!
    "I like skinny jeans. Sometimes I wear them to the mall to get an Orange Julius." -Chim Chim

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike A.
    hmmmm - i would have to change out my chain ring too...if i go White Bros in the back, I might as well go white bros chainring too, eh? right now i'm running a 34 / 17 set up and i don't see a 17t white bros free wheel

    Bikeman has WI FWs for under $80. I recently bought a 17T from them. I see no reason to change the chainring, much less spring for a WI if you do.

    http://www.bikeman.com/WIND-FWENO17.html

  23. #23
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    Smile related question

    I have the same knocking issue with my shimano freewheel. first one was quiet; this one knocks and creaks intermittently. If I spend the bucks and get a WI freewheel, which my LBS apparently can't get, is there a special tool needed to remove the WI freewheel, or can my LBS remove it just like they remove/replace the shimano freewheel. thanks for the help.

  24. #24
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    WI sells a tool but a shimano 4 prong removal tool works just the same. I've taken mine off 10+ times with a normal freewheel remover
    I repair Carbon Fiber frames.
    http://twobrotherscycleworks.blogspot.com/

  25. #25
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    I scavenged an old Suntour BMX freewheel off of an old freestyle bike. It is an amazing thing. It's surprisingly quiet, and the engagement is much closer than the ACS it replaced. I would say that if you have the opportunity to pick up an old Suntour it would be worth it. Otherwise the WI Eno is probably the only other good choice.

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