Knees, hips, and SS!- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Space Ghost
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    Knees, hips, and SS!

    I have only been doing the SS thing for a few months. I have noticed my right knee and hip really giving me problems. It is only the right side, and I can't figure out if it is riding the SS. I have never had a problem on my FS26er. My SS is a Dambala hardtail. It fits me great, so I don't think it is a fit issue. I am running a 34t Ring and it is a bit tall for the trails I ride. In other words I do a lot of slow grunting climbs. Any suggestions or similar situations?

  2. #2
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    Knee

    Can't help on the hips, but "long grunting climbs" can aggravate your knee. It is probably inflammation. Hit it with ice post-ride and ibuprofin if needed. I imagine a better ratio would help, but it wouldn't get you spinning.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach417
    Any suggestions or similar situations?
    Pick a ratio that requires less grunting. Avoid mashing while seated -- climb out of the saddle. Pay attention to the alignment of your limbs.

  4. #4
    bike dork
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    Sounds like classic ITB syndrome. But then again I'm not a doctor, I don't play one on TV and I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night..
    Full disclosure; I sell and repair bikes for a living: http://blackstonebicycles.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    Avoid mashing while seated -- climb out of the saddle.
    That is the number one thing compared to a gearie bike, especially FS. The leverages on the joints are totally different out of the saddle.

  6. #6
    Daddy of 3 now!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach417
    I have only been doing the SS thing for a few months. I have noticed my right knee and hip really giving me problems. It is only the right side, and I can't figure out if it is riding the SS. I have never had a problem on my FS26er. My SS is a Dambala hardtail. It fits me great, so I don't think it is a fit issue. I am running a 34t Ring and it is a bit tall for the trails I ride. In other words I do a lot of slow grunting climbs. Any suggestions or similar situations?
    I had same problem only in my right knee. Solved it with a clete adjustment. Try moving clete all the way back so you're on the ball of you foot. Also, try a lower gear ratio. You may spin out a bit on the flats but it's worth it on the climbs.
    Good luck.

  7. #7
    Basha Felika
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    That is the number one thing compared to a gearie bike, especially FS. The leverages on the joints are totally different out of the saddle.
    I couldn't agree more. Climbing out of the saddle is so much better for your knees.
    "Will you have nuts or a cigar, sir?" --an English soldier after Rourke's Drift

  8. #8
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    Most people's pelvises are a bit rotated, which makes one leg functionally shorter than the other. I'm no super expert on this, but that's what my physical therapists have told me. I have that because of scoliosis (or maybe I have scoliosis because my pelvis is tilted?). Just pay attention to how you pedal,your body position. As the others have said, don't sit and grind...stand up. The straighter you can stand, the better your knees will like it. I have ITB (you haven't given enough symptoms for a guess as to what it is), and I find that standing, riding on platform pedals does NOT aggravate it. Soon as I clip into my roadie, and go 20 miles, guess what flares up? Hmmmm......

  9. #9
    Space Ghost
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    Update

    I recently switched out my front ring from a 34 to a 32. It seems to have made all the difference. I am never seated, and trying to grind out slow technical climbs with the old gearing was the culprit. The pain going away was a bonus to making more climbs!
    "No good deed goes unpunished"

  10. #10
    SSasquatch
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbdee
    Sounds like classic ITB syndrome. But then again I'm not a doctor, I don't play one on TV and I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night..
    I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last week, so I am probably qualified and I agree that it sounds like ITB sydrome. I have had it on and off for the past 3 years and it is quite annoying but can be fixed with some relatively simple stretching exercises and a week or two off the bike.

  11. #11
    meh... whatever
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    yup, sounds like iliotibial band syndrome (itbs).

    itbs is very common among runners and cyclists, and often mimics more serious knee problems. while it can be very painful, it is generally not serious and very easily alleviated without any time off the bike.

    more info and stretches here.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  12. #12
    Space Ghost
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    Thanks for the help

    Although, it seems to have passed, I will actually try stretching before a ride. I know, I know, I should have been doing it all along. I have been an athlete for most of my life and was never much of a flexibility guy. Unless my coach stood over me, I half-assed it. I guess closing in on 40 is a time for change.
    "No good deed goes unpunished"

  13. #13
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach417
    Although, it seems to have passed, I will actually try stretching before a ride. I know, I know, I should have been doing it all along. I have been an athlete for most of my life and was never much of a flexibility guy. Unless my coach stood over me, I half-assed it. I guess closing in on 40 is a time for change.
    It's much more important to do the stretches AFTER you ride. And heh... wait til you're closin' in on 60

  14. #14
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    i ruined my knee riding a 1x9 on a road bike. (53x11-23) started out with patella tendonitis then progressed into a (dont know the technical term anymore) really screwed up knee. however.... i now use something called "the fluk" i believe...basically just a strap that goes around the base of my kneecap... with a little rehab and that guy im back in full effect. try finding that strap and lowering your gear.
    Whiskey bent, and hell bound.

  15. #15
    NormalNorm
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    yup, sounds like iliotibial band syndrome (itbs).

    itbs is very common among runners and cyclists, and often mimics more serious knee problems. while it can be very painful, it is generally not serious and very easily alleviated without any time off the bike.

    more info and stretches here.

    Agreed.....runners get it from running on one side of the road. IMO, try lower your saddle just a touch....like a 1/16th of a inch to start.

  16. #16
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    I had that problem.

    There were 3 things going on.

    1. seat hieght was wrong
    2. seat was not positioned correctly on the rails
    3. seat was not pointing straight (tip was pointing to the right by a half inch.

    get your body on the bike properly and you should be right. Also you need to ride with your whole body.

    forget sitting down and shifting through the gears to only use your legs. You need to use your whole body when climbing

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