Just built a singlespeed up. I thought it would be lighter.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Just built a singlespeed up. I thought it would be lighter.

    Is 23.2lb heavy for a full rigid singlespeed with just a rear brake?

    Here's the parts list.

    Marin Northside Trail
    Pace RC31 carbon fork
    DMR SS tensioner
    hacked cassette cog
    Sun Rhynolite/ XT wheels
    WTB Velociraptors 2.55
    Race Face crank/bash
    " stem, headset, seatpost
    Easton Monkeylite carbon bar
    WTB Speed V seat
    Hayes 9 rear brake 160mm

    I know the wheels are heavier items, but I thought my minimalistic approach would get me down to 21ish lb. My fully loaded Stumpy hardtail only weighs 25lb... disappointed. But I haven't rode it yet, so we'll see

    Pics tomorrow when I steal my camera back from the gf

  2. #2
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    my geared bike was always within 1lb of my SS.
    You gotta figure, the geared components probably arent more than 1-1.5lbs heavier. Especially if you ran xtr or XO and Grip Shift.
    Wheels and tires can make a bigger difference than that, easily.

  3. #3
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    srsly....it's your wheels and rubber....
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  4. #4
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    I guess you hit it dead on, the Stumpy has a XO and pg990. I thought my rigid fork would take off another 2lb, compared to a Reba. But the wheels were compared to DT 1450s with Kenda slicks, yeah that more than a 2lb difference definitely. (1450g vs 2200g?) I just wanted these wheels on this bike because I'm going to be doing slightly bigger jumps.

    Basically, the reason why I built a SS up is
    1. for a bit of challenge when riding with newbies that I bring into the sport
    2. for lending a bike to newbies to ride, and not worry about them breaking stuff.
    3. hitting the jumps.
    4. something different ?

  5. #5
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    Mine weighs 24.6 lbs. There, doesn't yours feel lighter now?

  6. #6
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    Frame weight? Tire weight?
    SS Rigid =
    Quote Originally Posted by gjenkins@
    There is no distraction. You only hear the sound of your breath and the crunch of the wheels across the dirt.

  7. #7
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    my 19" ss29er weighs 22lbs.....

  8. #8
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    hell....i had a FS SS weigh in at 21.5 lbs.......
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  9. #9
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    My 29er when I had a carbon fork plus lighter bars and pedals was like 24lbs now it's like 25.5-26. If I get another carbon fork it'll drop a pound
    SS Rigid =
    Quote Originally Posted by gjenkins@
    There is no distraction. You only hear the sound of your breath and the crunch of the wheels across the dirt.

  10. #10
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    mine ways 26lbs thats with front shock, walmart tubes and a brooks B17. My frame is a GF Ferrous. Sounds like 23 is pretty good.
    Last edited by illini; 03-18-2010 at 09:31 PM.

  11. #11
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    My Kona Unit weighs 175lbs...with me on it.

    I'd be happy with 23lbs for just the bike.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  12. #12
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    I only have a general idea how much either of my SS weigh. But they're both fun to ride.

  13. #13
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    A heavy bike still go's faster then a broken bike.
    The 1st production mountain bike was sold in 1984.
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  14. #14
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    Your wheels aren't just heavy, they're brutally heavy. By my estimate, the wheels alone weigh 2,550g (5.6#), with the tubes and tires adding another 2,200g (4.8#). A minimalist approach isn't going to get you anywhere if you put heavy ass parts on your bike!

    Since no one else has said it, if you're planning on riding you bike on trails, be responsible and put a front brake on it!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by qqfob
    I guess you hit it dead on, the Stumpy has a XO and pg990. I thought my rigid fork would take off another 2lb, compared to a Reba. But the wheels were compared to DT 1450s with Kenda slicks, yeah that more than a 2lb difference definitely. (1450g vs 2200g?) I just wanted these wheels on this bike because I'm going to be doing slightly bigger jumps.

    Basically, the reason why I built a SS up is
    1. for a bit of challenge when riding with newbies that I bring into the sport
    2. for lending a bike to newbies to ride, and not worry about them breaking stuff.
    3. hitting the jumps.
    4. something different ?
    heavy wheels arent exactly strong wheels. I have a set of DT Swiss xr1540's on my bike that i've had since 2006 and they're still straight and round with only one spoke tensioning in their life. I ride the hell out of them too... it's a bit rocky out here. I tried several heavier wheels and nothing has held up like these. I'm not sure if it's just dumb luck, but i'm sold.

  16. #16
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    my 29er ss was about 27. rigid too. after new wheels and rubber im just under 26 and when i am fully done it should be right around 25.
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding View Post
    The dude is like 120lbs, tops lol he can run any tires he wants without issues, i'm sure.

  17. #17
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    my quinglespeed road bike weights about that much....

    But it is lighter than my mtb and old SS

  18. #18
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    I think my ss weighs in around there with the rigid fork, a few pounds heavier with the squish fork. I think that a lot of the logic in singlespeeding is having a bike that will hold up through almost anything. Your build looks like it fits this description well, have fun with it. If you're really that bothered by the scale reading I'd start by downsizing at least the rear tire and doing a tubeless conversion front and rear to save weight and add to the reliability factor.

  19. #19
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    My single speed is under 20 pounds, and it's a bike which will hold up to most anything. It's quite possible to build a very durable bike, and still have it be light. You just need to do your research, and sweat the weight of every. single. bit.

  20. #20
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    I only have a general idea how much either of my SS weigh. But they're both fun to ride.
    Nuff said.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    My single speed is under 20 pounds, and it's a bike which will hold up to most anything. It's quite possible to build a very durable bike, and still have it be light. You just need to do your research, and sweat the weight of every. single. bit.
    A lot of the light stuff is very durable.

    My 26er is certainly under 25 lbs and its been on the roughest trails in Vegas, which is pretty rough.

  22. #22
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    I think a (reasonably) lightweight wheel set will come, but I did choose the 2.55 tires (for now) to give me a bit of a softer ride with the full rigidness... However, a set of Kenda Cross tires (slicks in the middle, knobs on the side) are ready to be swapped on. Tubeless will come as well. Probably will upgrade my Titus FTM and use its DT 4.2/240s on this at some point.

    So, I really do need a front brake? I rarely use it in the trails, only on the street I try to balance the wear of both the front and rear brakes. I will try this first Forgot to mention that this build is from leftover parts, with the exception of the chain tensioner. I just need to shorten the hose and buy a rotor to be able to use a front brake.

    I rode it around the block a few times today, this thing is pretty fun! I think I can make taller obsticals (foot tall curb) than if I had any suspension, and I'm more tempted to try riskier stuff since I don't have to worry about a $100 derailer or my 8" front rotor. I'm running 18/32, would probably be a okay for my local trail, but I do think it definitely sucks on the street at this ratio.

  23. #23
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    My old SS was 25lbs. My new one will be just under 19lbs. Just spend 3-4k and you can have a light bike too. My 25lb SS was about 1.5k.

  24. #24
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    I just bought my first single speed yesterday (Full ridgid 29er). At 25 pounds OEM it weighs more than my FS(20.5lbs). However, i am comparing an S-Works Epic to a 29er so apples and oranges. I'm fitting my weight weenie tendency on my SS. I bought it for training and something different. Maybe do a SS race after my main XC race. I know the wheels are the main anchors on the bike, but seatpost, seat and BB are other key areas.

  25. #25
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    I don't know what any of my bikes weigh, but I don't care. Going from an 18t to a 20t can feel like an easy 5lb loss on those climbs

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by qqfob
    So, I really do need a front brake? I rarely use it in the trails, only on the street I try to balance the wear of both the front and rear brakes. I will try this first Forgot to mention that this build is from leftover parts, with the exception of the chain tensioner. I just need to shorten the hose and buy a rotor to be able to use a front brake.
    If you're riding off road, then yes, you really do. Most of your stopping power comes from your front brake, so you're giving up a lot of performance not having one. Next, you'll going to be skidding your rear brake more if you don't have a front, and that's not good for the trails and is just bad stewardship.

  27. #27
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    Seriously if I was to run only 1 brake it would be front...
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  28. #28
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    Physics says run a front brake. Maybe it will help your bike feel lighter. You'll appreciate it the first time (insert any sort of emergency situation arises here).

    Weight is overrated or something.

  29. #29
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    My 20" Mary is a bit of a fatty at ~30lbs. If I didn't weight over 200lbs I might worry about it. I'm too heavy to bother with being a weight weenie.

  30. #30
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    Lol- mine weighs 28 lbs.

    Beefy wheels, I guess.
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  31. #31
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    Yes!

    YES! To the original question.
    My Bikes Kick Ass!!!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgredjeep
    My 20" Mary is a bit of a fatty at ~30lbs. If I didn't weight over 200lbs I might worry about it. I'm too heavy to bother with being a weight weenie.
    +1 one for me as well...I'm over 200 and my SS is sitting at 29.5 with HEAVY Tires and Wheels. I can easily shave 3 to 4 with lighter tires and wheels...but then I have to worry about pinch flats and broken up wheels as I don't always pick the path of least resistance.


    But I'm also running a 160mm air fork.
    10 TransAM SS
    S-Works M2
    Nomad3cc xx1 - Sold
    Hightower LTcc - 18 Lg - Sold
    (Building up 19 in XL)

  33. #33
    holding back the darkness
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    I am against weighing bicycles in general. It's bad all around. Once you know you can't un-know.
    Today I broke my rules and weighed my 29er SS and my 5.5inch travel all-mountain bike complete with 2.4 inch UST tires, adjustable post, heavy saddle from 10 years ago (my fav), RS Pike (no lightweight), ect.
    They came in within 3lbs of each other. 26 for the IF and 29 for the Ibis.
    Probably the dumbest thing I have ever done with bicycles.

  34. #34
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    Being a XC racer, its important for me to know how much my bike weighs. Last thing I want to do is waste energy lugging around a heavy bike. By no means am I a weight weenie, but I am very conscious of weight of each component. 99% of my focus is on MY conditioning and not shopping around for lighter parts.

    Now my 29er singlespeed, not so much. Its for training and some fun races. It weighs high 24 pounds. . Not sure if thats good or bad for 29er SS. Like I said before, my real baby is my FS epic. That's my primary race bike, thus it weighs 20 pounds.

  35. #35
    holding back the darkness
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    Uno

    I have been an XC racer, and an endurance racer and had my share of successes and failures over my career..
    Concern over weight is for neurotics. I understand that no one wants to race a tank, but within reason...
    Weight is probably the least critical aspect of race setup, and yet it is the one we fret over and pay the most for. Why?
    1. It's fashionable to have a light bike. All the cool kids have light bikes
    2. It has been marketed to us that light bikes are fast bikes and so gram shaving has always been an easy way to sell "performance" to suckers.
    Want a real energy savings? Don't waste it worrying about weight.

    Greater than any win, any podium finish, is stomping into the earth heshers with more money than talent. Grinding their wills into dust and witnessing the helplessness on their faces when they get dropped by someone on a bike pounds heavier and years removed.
    Its absolutely beautiful.

    Long long ago, before any of this SS nonsense was mainstream, there was this racer we all called Uno.
    Uno was the first SSer I ever met; had even ever heard of. He raced expert on a steel bike that he welded together himself. Build out of random BMX parts. It looked like a overgrown mutant BMX bike. There was no SS class because there were no other SS riders. Just him. He was soft spoken, eccentric.
    But he totally kicked ass. F'n spanked dudes on bikes that were on bikes 10 lbs lighter wearing cut-off jean shorts and t-shirts to their sublimated monstrosities pimping any sponsor that threw their "team" $50 for some ad space.
    And he never said sh!t about it. Humble. And I think that burned asses even more.
    His secret? He loved riding his bike. He had fun. He flowed. It wasn't even like he was racing, it was like he was the only one out there and he couldn't care less about the event or the fact that there were other people out there attempting to ride faster than him.
    He was pure. I heard that someone even tried to sponsor him once, some shop hooked him up with a grassroots deal or borrowed him a lightweight geared bike or somesuch. It didn't work. The spell broke. He was mediocre at best and went back to his homemade SS and resumed kicking @ss.
    Point is, love whatever you ride. Enjoy it. Immerse yourself in it. Melt away in it and you will be faster than you have ever been. The magazines and companies will never mention that, because you can't sell it. You already have it. And it has nothing to do with how much your bike weighs or what it's made of. It's what YOU are made of.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by subliminalshiver
    Point is, love whatever you ride. Enjoy it. Immerse yourself in it. Melt away in it and you will be faster than you have ever been. The magazines and companies will never mention that, because you can't sell it. You already have it. And it has nothing to do with how much your bike weighs or what it's made of. It's what YOU are made of.
    Ugh, really? Are we now going to start talking about "purity"? If he was so pure, then a simple sponsorship wouldn't have affected him. Fact is, light bikes are fun. They're easier to move around, they pedal faster, they climb easier, they bunny hop higher. Why do you think even trials riders and pro DH racers are looking for lightness? Sure, if you start worrying about making your bike lighter over riding, or start compromising the bike's performance to save weight you've gone too far. But it's very easy to keep an eye on the weight of the bike, have a light bike, and be having a great time riding.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowball
    +1 one for me as well...I'm over 200 and my SS is sitting at 29.5 with HEAVY Tires and Wheels. I can easily shave 3 to 4 with lighter tires and wheels...but then I have to worry about pinch flats and broken up wheels as I don't always pick the path of least resistance.


    But I'm also running a 160mm air fork.
    Yeah, I swapped the rigid for a 100mm Reba on mine as well. I'm to old to beat on my elbows like I did when I was a kid.

  38. #38
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    Going from an 18t to a 20t can feel like an easy 5lb loss on those climbs

    I just switched from an 18t to a 22t and it feels like 10 pounds disappeared. I am on a full rigid 29r single speed and its amazing, especially now that it climbs like a mule.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by subliminalshiver
    I have been an XC racer, and an endurance racer and had my share of successes and failures over my career..
    Concern over weight is for neurotics. I understand that no one wants to race a tank, but within reason...
    Weight is probably the least critical aspect of race setup, and yet it is the one we fret over and pay the most for. Why?
    1. It's fashionable to have a light bike. All the cool kids have light bikes
    2. It has been marketed to us that light bikes are fast bikes and so gram shaving has always been an easy way to sell "performance" to suckers.
    Want a real energy savings? Don't waste it worrying about weight.

    Greater than any win, any podium finish, is stomping into the earth heshers with more money than talent. Grinding their wills into dust and witnessing the helplessness on their faces when they get dropped by someone on a bike pounds heavier and years removed.
    Its absolutely beautiful.

    Long long ago, before any of this SS nonsense was mainstream, there was this racer we all called Uno.
    Uno was the first SSer I ever met; had even ever heard of. He raced expert on a steel bike that he welded together himself. Build out of random BMX parts. It looked like a overgrown mutant BMX bike. There was no SS class because there were no other SS riders. Just him. He was soft spoken, eccentric.
    But he totally kicked ass. F'n spanked dudes on bikes that were on bikes 10 lbs lighter wearing cut-off jean shorts and t-shirts to their sublimated monstrosities pimping any sponsor that threw their "team" $50 for some ad space.
    And he never said sh!t about it. Humble. And I think that burned asses even more.
    His secret? He loved riding his bike. He had fun. He flowed. It wasn't even like he was racing, it was like he was the only one out there and he couldn't care less about the event or the fact that there were other people out there attempting to ride faster than him.
    He was pure. I heard that someone even tried to sponsor him once, some shop hooked him up with a grassroots deal or borrowed him a lightweight geared bike or somesuch. It didn't work. The spell broke. He was mediocre at best and went back to his homemade SS and resumed kicking @ss.
    Point is, love whatever you ride. Enjoy it. Immerse yourself in it. Melt away in it and you will be faster than you have ever been. The magazines and companies will never mention that, because you can't sell it. You already have it. And it has nothing to do with how much your bike weighs or what it's made of. It's what YOU are made of.
    I'm all about the love of riding as much as the next hippie on two wheels, but just because someone cares about the science of racing doesnt mean that they arent any less of a dedicated or "pure" rider.
    There's any number of reasons why his sponsor's bike didnt work for him. Incorrect size, geometry, suspension setup, etc. Geared bikes use a whole different muscle group as well, so if you're not trained for it, chances are you'll do poorly.
    Try riding a 17-18lb SS bike like the Ibis Tranny and tell me it doesnt feel any faster than your 26lb IF ss.

  40. #40
    V-Shaped Rut
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    Light is fun, more light is more fun as long as you're not breaking stuff. I figure go as light as you can afford and just short of the hardcore WW stuff. You'll have a super fun bike that will last 5+ years.

    I was also disappointed when I used spare parts to build up my current ride while waiting for a new car, a move and other stuff tying up my $$. Heavy wheels, heavy bars, heavy seatpost, heavy stem, etc...

    Guess what anti WW's? After the diet the bike is more fun to ride. Oh yes, it is.

  41. #41
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    My bike now weighs 24.7 lbs after putting on a mx pro lo . With a rigid fork I went as low as 20.2! But a forearm fracture now dictates that I use a squishy. My aim is to bring it down to 23lbs - and Im happy

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    My bike now weighs 24.7 lbs after putting on a mx pro lo . With a rigid fork I went as low as 20.2! But a forearm fracture now dictates that I use a squishy. My aim is to bring it down to 23lbs - and Im happy
    wowsers, that must be a heavy susp fork!

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