The jump to Rigid?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 28 of 28
  1. #1
    Monocog Masher
    Reputation: Merost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    161

    The jump to Rigid?

    I've been riding on a Reba, but I wanna get a new 29er SS and I've been contemplating getting the Niner carbon fork on it. I'm a little worried that it won't be as much fun, but maybe it will be more fun.

    Any ride qualities improved with a rigid fork? Is it possible the ride will be even funner?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    212
    Not as easy on the arms but you will learn to loosen up over the rough stuff, faster on climbs, and I think it get you more in touch with the terrain, also running lower PSI will help soften the ride up a bit if it seems to harsh. Overall I think its much more fun then using a suspension fork.
    Rolling the Fattys

  3. #3
    SSolo, on your left!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,577
    Quote Originally Posted by RussoJ
    Not as easy on the arms but you will learn to loosen up over the rough stuff, faster on climbs, and I think it get you more in touch with the terrain, also running lower PSI will help soften the ride up a bit if it seems to harsh. Overall I think its much more fun then using a suspension fork.
    X2, plus tire choice (volume and traction), grips, bars and gloves play into it more than with suspension....definitely feel more in touch with the trail....slower on bumpy downhills....you'll re-learn how to pick lines and go with the flow when it's unavoidable. Gotta have the loose but in control riding style. It's lots of fun to me, but I have another bike with a fork for the really rugged trails.
    Get off the couch and ride!

  4. #4
    Recovering Weight Weenie
    Reputation: Padre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,814
    Go on a 5 mile jog in your neighborhood... barefoot. The fun equates to riding rigid.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    809
    I think I have more fun with suspension. Sometimes rigid is just slower. Slower does not equal "in touch" with anything.

  6. #6
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    Try riding with your fork locked out.
    It will have a little give but will give you an idea if rigid will be something for you.

  7. #7
    Retro Grouch
    Reputation: aka brad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,091
    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    Go on a 5 mile jog in your neighborhood... barefoot. The fun equates to riding rigid.
    Riding rigid equates to riding SS; when all is said and done it's a different style of riding. Some like rigid, some don't, same as SS. I'm old enough that it is a return to a time before my bikes had shocks; for others it will be a new experience. I'm sure there are some that want to ride rigid because it's trendy, but that doesn't last long; you have to really want your bike to whack the hell out of you.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    231
    It also depends on the terrain you ride. If you ride a lot of buff flowy singletrack, then rigid is a good choice. If you ride a lot of techy rock gardens, then you really have to decide if trading off going slower through DH sections for the "feeling of being connected" is worth it. I have a full rigid SS, but I also have a 6" full boinger as well and they get almost the same amount of saddle time with a slight favor going to the SS. I ride in Arizona which even the smooth XC trails are rocky, and the rigid SS makes a lot of those trails more fun for me to pick lines and focus more. I think it makes me a better rider on my FS bike when I want to rip down some of the chunky DH trails we have here. And as aka brad said, I can remember the days before suspension and I also remember how much I loved my first Mag 21 (63mm of travel with a 1" steerer tube) after years of riding rigid MTB. Just realize that rigid will beat you up more, and you will be slower on rocky tech descents. This may be more fun (for many trails it is), or you may hate it, it really is personal preference, but it will probably make you a better rider overall.

    One other thing: you will never be out in the boonies with blown fork seals or a defective cartridge while running rigid. The same simplicity that draws many to SS, makes going rigid a complimentary choice for any SS bike.
    Last edited by mountainflow; 11-28-2009 at 11:17 PM.

  9. #9
    spec4life???..smh...
    Reputation: spec4life's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,091
    I went rigid for the first time this year and i really enjoy it...you can really feel it in the tight turns it just rails the berms...plus the dropped weight and no boing makes climbing much more enjoyable...the downhill stuff is a new skill that you have to learn and adapt to but wiith time you can be fast...

    for me i think in the long run ill always have one rigid bike in the stable...

  10. #10
    I'm gonna have to kill ya
    Reputation: roybatty666's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    321
    I really didn't find it hard at all and I went from 6" front and 7.5" rear.

    I was expecting to be battered to crap but I honestly didn't feel it, I have been riding long enough to have started before suspension was about so I reverted quite naturally.

    Pick better lines and don't plow over stuff (which you should do anyway) use your arms and legs to absorb the bumps and its all good, the instant power transfer and efficiency of a rigid out weighs the lack of suspension for me

  11. #11
    Life is Go0d!
    Reputation: mo0se's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    891
    Its the operator, that dictates how much you get beat up. You cannot jump on a rigid bike, and ride it the same way. For me, its the challenge of finding the best, most efficient line, and interacting with the terrain. I like participating in the ride, rather than just zoning out, and spinning like a zombie. If I wanted that, I would buy a road bike.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  12. #12
    Life is Go0d!
    Reputation: mo0se's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    891
    I forgot... how much fun you have, is dictated by your common sense, and participation. For the record, going slower means better balance is required, on the technical trails.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    Go on a 5 mile jog in your neighborhood... barefoot. The fun equates to riding rigid.
    Running barefoot -- the way nature designed us to run!

    http://runningbarefoot.org/

    Riding a bike with suspension is like showering in a raincoat -- if you're afraid of the water, stay out of the pool.

    Riding a bike with suspension is like skiing knee-deep powder in big plastic boots rather than with leather boots and a free-heel.

    Riding a bike with suspension is like having sex wearing a c....

    You get the picture. Riding rigid is as much fun as you can have with your clothes on, and if you're into lycra it doesn't even have to be done with much in the way of clothes.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GTscoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,337
    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    You cannot jump on a rigid bike.
    I think there's a host of BMX kids that would argue this point to death. I've done some nasty drops on mine that my buddy thought would blow out his Marzocchi 66 fork.

    Rigid is different, its frustrating through really rocky descents but rewarding. Its also much easier to pop the front end up and over obstacles in the path. I agree with the guy who says that he'll always keep a rigid in the stable, if nothing else but to keep you a humble rider.

    <<------ This guy is ditching his rigid fork for a RS Pike next week and extremely excited.

  15. #15
    Retro Grouch
    Reputation: aka brad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,091
    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    Its the operator, that dictates how much you get beat up.
    Yes and no; if you are saying there are ways to mitigate getting beat up on a rigid, I agree . But, riding rigid sometimes means, regardless or your technique, you're going to whack the hell out of yourself. In those cases you just have to hold on to the handlebars and watch a the blurry world in front of you.

    Quote Originally Posted by misanthrope

    Riding a bike with suspension is like showering in a raincoat -- if you're afraid of the water, stay out of the pool.
    I guess this assumes one showers in a pool.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  16. #16
    one chain loop
    Reputation: fishcreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,360
    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    ...you just have to hold on to the handlebars and watch a blurry world.
    ...and have itchy forearms.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  17. #17
    Life is Go0d!
    Reputation: mo0se's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    891
    I never you could not jump ON a rigid bike, and ride it the same way you do suspension bikes. I did say that hucking a 29 ss rigid is not the best plan... thats why Hecklers exist.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    I guess this assumes one showers in a pool.
    Just mixing metaphors...seemed appropriate.
    Seriously, I like to tinker as much as the next guy but I've never got done with a ride and said "Gee, that would have been more fun if I only had suspension". I expect I could find a trail where I might say it, but then I'd be wasting my time if I searched it out. There are far too many awesome rides for rigid and suspended riders alike, no need to search for one that isn't awesome.

  19. #19
    Monocog Masher
    Reputation: Merost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    Riding rigid equates to riding SS; when all is said and done it's a different style of riding. Some like rigid, some don't, same as SS. I'm old enough that it is a return to a time before my bikes had shocks; for others it will be a new experience. I'm sure there are some that want to ride rigid because it's trendy, but that doesn't last long; you have to really want your bike to whack the hell out of you.
    Nice way of putting it. My first mt bike was a Schwinn Impact Pro (circa 2001), which of course was rigid. I had a blast on that bike, and that was before fat tubeless 29er tires.

    But I would like to race the bike and the rigid fork might slow me down a lot (if that's possible). Maybe I'll put my Reba on my new bike and get a rigid fork for my Rig and then I'll have both????

  20. #20
    PSYCHOLUST
    Reputation: scyule's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    483
    Lots of interesting stuff above this, some real wisdom and some bravado shite. Everyone is going to have an opinion,

    " depends on the terrain you ride" is likely the best advise.

    In my own experience, I started out using a rigid fork that I had available to me because I was curious ( I did have a light 80mm fork standing by)

    I am still riding the rigid, not because it makes me a real man or because it gives me some cosmic connection to mother earth, but because it makes the bike climb like a mountain goat compared to any hard tail I rode with a suspension fork. Being on a singlespeed is likely to mean you will be out of the saddle climbing WAY more than you ever did on a suspended bike and a rigid fork helps a ton ( and saves you a pound or two) .

    have fun

  21. #21
    Occasionally engagedů
    Reputation: Ptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,639
    Quote Originally Posted by scyule
    I am still riding the rigid, not because it makes me a real man or because it gives me some cosmic connection to mother earth, but because it makes the bike climb like a mountain goat compared to any hard tail I rode with a suspension fork. Being on a singlespeed is likely to mean you will be out of the saddle climbing WAY more than you ever did on a suspended bike and a rigid fork helps a ton ( and saves you a pound or two) .
    What he said!
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  22. #22
    Pedal smarter, not harder
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    46

    rigid all the way!

    Everybody knows cars and motorcycles without suspension are much faster than those with. why wouldn't you want your tires bouncing all over the trail, especially turning through rocks and over off camber roots and ruts. It only makes sense thatyou will be more "one with the trail" especially when you are slamming down on it and shredding your tender flesh into it mixing your molecules with mother earth's. you might as well go all the way and run it fixed while you're at it. everyone knows you won't be a real purist unless you run a rigid fixed. as for me i was riding rigid from 1984 to 1997. I bought my first SS in 1998 it came with a rigid fork that I rode for exactly three rides. I've been there and done that. I like to run an 80 mm fork and a fat tubeless tire with low psi. anything smooth enough for a rigid bike, I will be riding my road bike or CX bike on. Game over.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by cbetony
    Everybody knows cars and motorcycles without suspension are much faster than those with.
    This is such an old, tired, worn-out, and just plain stupid analogy -- worth noting the irrelevance, but not worth explaining why ('cause you wouldn't get it).

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tubadude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    191
    Is your way the only excellent way?

  25. #25
    achiever
    Reputation: redwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    929
    I've been riding rigid for most of the last year mostly because I don't have the cash to drop on a suspension fork. I rode a Monocog 29er up until October then built up an On One Scandal with a carbon fork. Most of the year I stayed away from some of the rockier more techy trails just figuring I'd beat myself up too much. Since late summer however, I've been riding those trails again and don't miss suspension all that much. The downhills are slower for sure but the climbing is quite a bit easier with no lost energy to the fork bobbing up and down while out of the seat mashing.

    The three biggest differences are line selection, soaking up the trail with your body's suspension and making a concerted effort to keep the front end unweighted. Line selection is all about looking down the trail for the smothest line you can find. This doesn't necessarily mean avoiding everthing but knowing what you can get over or through without losing too much momentum. Using your arms and legs to soak up the shock of the trail is actually pretty efficient. It's really just riding "loose". If you're a fan of the death grip and ride stiff legged an straight armed, rigid isn't your game. Keeping the front unweighted helps a lot when climbing tech uphill stuff. It's not like you're riding the back wheel but making subtle rearward weight shifts to help ease the front wheel up and over oraround obstacles.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    32
    I think riding a rigid steel or carbon fork feels more like a short travel fork that a locked out suspention fork because they are much more compliant and smooth. It's really dependant on tire choice, air pressure and the rolling contact patch. I've noticed a huge improvement using larger volume tires with lower air pressure. And of course rim diameter is huge as well. A 29er tire with the same dimentions will be totally differnt from a 26" or a 650b tire. I have found that I much prefer a supple 26" 2.5" to a firmer 29er when it comes to the trails in Washington state, but in California and northern Nevada 29er feels a lot faster. I think running stan's makes a big difference too.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: byteMe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    27
    You have denounced gears, why not suspension as well ..

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tubadude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    191
    Quote Originally Posted by byteMe
    You have denounced gears, why not suspension as well ..
    I didn't denounce gears. It's a bike not a religion. Ride whatever gets the job done. To me the job is to smile.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.