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  1. #1
    Nat
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    Jones H-Bar users...

    1. Those of you who have the curved extension variety, do you find you use the curved portion much? Did you have difficulty sliding brake levers on the curved portion?

    2. On steep descents (steep enough to have your butt pretty much touching the rear tire), how's the wrist position on the angled part of the bar? I picture this scenario as one in which a "normal" bar would be better.

  2. #2
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    My thoughts

    1. No, I don't use them much and no, I didn't have any trouble getting the brake levers on. I guess you could carefully spread the clamp of the brake lever if it was a big issue.

    2. Most of my trails around here don't require that kind of body position, but I have had no problem with every situation I have encountered thus far.

  3. #3
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    No wrist issues

    I have ridden my H-bars since summer. No problems with off saddle riding with my weight over the rear tire from a wrist comfort standpoint. To me, the 45 degree sweep is idea for both seated and off saddle riding.

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  4. #4
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    my 2 cents:

    those things look ridiculous.

  5. #5
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    Who made you the fashion police

    Quote Originally Posted by bubbrubb
    my 2 cents:

    those things look ridiculous.
    Ride with a set then you will understand. As far as downhilling is concerned: I feel no discomfort in my wrists. The H-Bars should be angled down at the back. It is a very natural position.

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  6. #6
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by motoman711
    Ride with a set then you will understand. As far as downhilling is concerned: I feel no discomfort in my wrists. The H-Bars should be angled down at the back. It is a very natural position.

    Moto
    Do you use the curved extensions much?

    Did the curved portions make installing the brake levers difficult?

  7. #7
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by partially hydrogenated
    I have ridden my H-bars since summer. No problems with off saddle riding with my weight over the rear tire from a wrist comfort standpoint. To me, the 45 degree sweep is idea for both seated and off saddle riding.

    I can't quite tell from the pic which version you have. Are those the stubby extensions?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bubbrubb
    ...those things look ridiculous.
    You're right, they do look funny. But they feel GREAT! I meet people on the trail all the time who decide to take the time to inform me that my bars are hideous looking. Funny. Don't knock'em til you try'em. I can ride longer on these bars. Jeff took the comfort of the beach cruiser's handlebar and put it into a aggressive mountain bike oriented design and it's successful.

    It's easier to bunny hop with these bars. Performing a trackstrand is also easier. Tight slow speed tech sections are more manageable because the 45 degree wrist angle allows you to rock the bike from side to side with ease.

    To be honest, I think all mountain bikes look ugly since you bring up aesthetics. To me, my mountain bike is all about function and serving my needs on the trail.

    For beauty, there's nothing that beats the timeless looks of a fixed gear track bike. I'll spend my time gazing at those if I wanted a buuuuuutiful bike

    Last edited by partially hydrogenated; 11-07-2004 at 11:11 AM.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    I can't quite tell from the pic which version you have. Are those the stubby extensions?
    I have the H-bars with no extensions, just a little nub for the thumbie shifters.

    Here's a front shot of the bars when I had them on my previous frame. I shot this with my 17mm w i d e angle lens, so the bars look wider than they really are.

    Last edited by partially hydrogenated; 11-07-2004 at 06:28 AM.
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  10. #10
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    Actuallly I think they look pretty cool, but who cares - form over function. I wish there was a less expensive aluminum version so that you could try them without making a major expenditure.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by (Tom)
    ...I wish there was a less expensive aluminum version so that you could try them without making a major expenditure.
    Well, I was talking to Jeff a while back and he said that sometime in the future he'll make an affordable quality light chromoly version of the H-bars.

    But don't hold your breath he told me. He's way too busy filing orders for Ti frames and bars and said he would think about the cromo ones when he has time, which isn't any time soon.

    Post a "want to buy" for the few steel H-bars that are out there. Jeff made a handful of cromo prototypes for testing. After he was done with them, hee sold them for less than $60, mostly by word of mouth. I have one of these. One day when I upgrade to the Ti ones, I'll post mine for sale.

    To be honest, you can always resale the Ti bars with ease. If you don't mind the $160-$190 price tag, but was just concerned about potentially being stuck with an expensive item that you didn't like. You can always sell them for just $15 less than what you paid and I you be bombarded with emails.
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  12. #12
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    What length stem do you typically run with these bars?
    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  13. #13
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    Answers

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Do you use the curved extensions much?

    Did the curved portions make installing the brake levers difficult?
    1. I use the curved extensions from time to time just to change my hand position. I ride a singlespeed so it isn't about aerodynamic efficiency. There are actually more positions than just 2. There are several along the back part. If you hold on near the back of the bar it is similar to running a really short stem and actually quickens up the steering. Excellent for technical singletrack. Move your hands to the middle and you get the standard position. Perfectly comfortable in all conditions. A little farther forward and you have an excellent climbing position.

    2. My XTR levers slid on with no problem. You will just need a longer brake cable. You should also adjust the reach as close to the bar as possible. I can easily reach the brake lever from any of the rearward positions. Single finger from the back.

    I run a 130mm stem with 15degrees of rise. I use a thomson stem as you are putting a lot of torque on the stem with these bars.

    I have to say that my Karate Monkey with these bars feels absolutely dialed. I have never owned a more comfortable bike. I let a buddy of mine ride it the other day and he couldn't stop gushing the whole time he was on it.

    Moto
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquaholic
    What length stem do you typically run with these bars?
    I am running a 130mm 6 degree with the Jones.
    You need to run a longer stem than usual to compensate for how far back the sweeps come. I used to ride a 90mm stem with my regular bars (risers and flats). So factor in at least 25-30mm longer stem.

    Jeff ships these bars with a little one page guide on setup and recommendations.

    He recommends a 4 bolt stem face plate. I am using a 2 bolt one, but it's wider than the average two bolt, so It's okay.
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  15. #15
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    Ride with H-Bars and new stem

    FYI, I normally ride a 26" low rise Easton Monkeylite (3/4" rise) and a 120x5 stem.

    Got a new stem to try and fine tune the fit of my SS KM. My seat was as far back as possible with a temporary 135x5 stem. I put a 140x15 stem on it and was able to scoot the seat a nudge forward till it felt comfortable. The result was one fine riding bike. I went down both steep, sketchy trail sections of a local park like they were nothing. I actually feel better on this bike down these two sections than I do on my old 5" travel Heckler (which I have now sold to buy a 29" Lenz Leviathan). Not sure if it was the 29" wheels that made me feel this way, but the bars held me back in now way. As someone stated before, the leverage you have in slow speed situations is great. I'm actually a better trackstander now than before.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by (Tom)
    Actuallly I think they look pretty cool...
    That must be the ghost of Bob Ross talking through you. Bob thought everything was pretty.

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  17. #17
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    1. Those of you who have the curved extension variety, do you find you use the curved portion much? Did you have difficulty sliding brake levers on the curved portion?

    2. On steep descents (steep enough to have your butt pretty much touching the rear tire), how's the wrist position on the angled part of the bar? I picture this scenario as one in which a "normal" bar would be better.
    Thanks for the responses everybody. I'm planning on ordering some H-Bars, but I'm trying to decide on which version to get.

  18. #18
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    Rider review here...

    Joe Whitehair wrote this review of the Jones H-bar on his SS site:

    https://www.singlespeedoutlaw.com/is...nkdrawer.shtml

    Scroll down, it's somewhere in the middle of the page.

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  19. #19
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    I have the stubby bar on my SS and just bought the curved one for a new bike I’m building. I use a “virtual” extension on my stubby bar all the time I really like the feel of it on non technical seated climbs. I am looking forward to the curved extensions on the new bar. As a long time roadie on of the things I always dislike about mountain bikes is the lack of multiple hand positions I have tried dirt drops but just don’t care for them. Jones bars have solved that issue for me. If I don’t like the extensions I can always cut them off.

    When I first got my Jones bar it made descending a little weird but once I got my brake lever and stem set up right, descending is as good if not better than a regular bar no matter how steep it is. As already stated slow speed stuff is better and I find wheelie drops to be allot easier.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endomaniac
    ... I use a “virtual” extension on my stubby bar all the time...
    Same here. I use the little nubs as extensions sometimes.
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  21. #21
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    So y'all got the stubby's for the weigth?
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    So y'all got the stubby's for the weigth?
    No I got mine used. For the price I paid I wasn't going to be choosy.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    So y'all got the stubby's for the weigth?
    Nah. I bought one of the last cromo prototypes from Jeff and just took whatever he had left. For the price, I was not picky.
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  24. #24
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    I hated mine...

    Before legions of angry Jonesians start hectoring me, keep in mind that I'm in no way saying that the bars aren't great for YOU.

    The story: After seeing some H-bars on a customers bike, I thought I'd try them out, but the $200 pricetag scared me off, so I just fabbed up a couple of H-bar clones out of old steel handlebars in a bin in the shop (there's not exactly a shortage, I'm a packrat). One set had about 40 degrees of sweep, the other had about 35. The width was roughly 26". They were not exactly works of art (I spent ~15 minutes on each bar, and the original steel bars were pretty rusty and gross) but they were straight and certainly plenty beefy enough (350 grams!) for just about anything. I rode the bars on my singlespeed for about 3 weeks, trying a variety of control/hand positions and stem lengths (from 140mm to 80mm). The final decision was to retire them to the townie. Why? I've tried to break it down as follows:

    The pros:
    -The bars were SUPER comfy. Definitely easier on the wrists than most. Some of this could probably be attributed to the extra flex of steel, and the longer stem that I ran most of the time. But most of it was probably superior ergonomics.

    -Bars looked wicked weird (and IMO cool) and inspired plenty of both derogatory and admiring comments from other riders. A few people attempted to hire me to build them a set (please note that I will NOT ever be selling these things, so please don't ask).

    -Bars handled admirably on smooth singletrack and mellow fire road type riding.

    The cons:
    -When the terrain got rough, I completely lost control of the bike. Keep in mind: I raced as a NORBA pro for years, raced motocross and enduros, and generally know pretty well how to handle a bike. Rough stuff was nigh-unrideable on the H-bars no matter what stem length, sweep, or hand position I tried (I have a theory on why, see below).

    -When the terrain got steep (meaning, behind the saddle) I couldn't hold onto the bars. I felt like my hands were trying to slip off the ends, and actual control of the bike was nonexistent. I took to walking down stuff that I would normally ride with relative ease.

    -Bars weighed a ton. Probably not as much a concern with the *actual* H-bars.

    -I couldn't bunnyhop worth a damn. My typical bunnyhop method (with conventional bars) is to do a semi-manual to get the front wheel a ways off the ground, then spring up and forwards to lift the rear wheel as well (the way you'd bunnyhop on flat pedals, not just jumping straight up and pulling the bike up to you with your spds, as many folks do). I found this to be nigh-impossible to do with the H-bar.


    So why didn't I like them? Keep in mind that I came into this experiment WANTING to use the bars on ALL of my bikes, because I really thought they made sense. If I could have ridden decently with them, I certainly would still be riding them today.

    I think the problem for really rough terrain and steep stuff is that instead of resisting the impacts of rocks and such (which are trying to pull the bars out of your hands in one direction or the other) by pushing and pulling (as if you're holding onto the bar on a rowing machine) with your elbows bent at *approximately* right angles, you have to kind of "cling" to the bars and resist those trail impacts using your shoulders and pecs, much moreso than your biceps/triceps. I found that this didn't work ergonomically for me at ALL. Comfortable does not necessarily equal workable - if it were, I'd be riding a recumbent on the singletrack these days.

    I think it's also interesting to note that offroad motorcycles (on which handling and control ergonomics are at a premium, since the bikes provide plenty of motive force) typically have bars with sweep about the same as mountain bikes (ie <15 degrees). If there were a real ergonomic advantage, I would think that moto folks would have started using something similar, since there's LOTS of innovation in that industry and much less emphasis on lightweight parts (don't get me started on the AMA weight limits, they're just as stupid as the UCI ones). Generally, though, the only bars with lots of sweep you'll find are on older bikes from the 1970s and such.

    I'm not going to say that the H-bars are a fad. Way too many people swear by them. But I find it a bit shocking that NOBODY ever pipes up to say "Yeah, didn't like mine, sold 'em to a friend" or something similar, let alone actually critiquing the things. Maybe if you pay $200 for a handlebar, you aren't ready to admit (no matter what) that the things don't work very well for you.

    Or maybe I'm just the odd man out. Wouldn't be the first time!

    -Walt

  25. #25
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    Disappointment...

    I tried to mount a set on my gearie. I guess they're not really meant for geared bikes, because they really mess with positioning of the controls. I couldn't mount the X-9 shifters properly. I won't be running a Jones bar.

    They looked safe, but you wouldn't mistake it for a Moots part.

    If he'd just curve the crossbar so that it reaches FORWARD before intersecting the diagonals, everything would work great. And you wouldn't have to run a longer stem. You could run your controls next to your hand, where they were designed to be.

    I'm bummed, because I was really expecting to like them.

  26. #26
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    I wanted to like mine, but sold for the same reasons you mentioned, so you're not alone.

    However, I think the bars are a great idea if they work for you.

    B
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  27. #27
    Nat
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    Two more questions...

    Do you all like the Jones cork grips?

    Do you think that the 45 degree angle is ideal, or would you prefer a different angle? Holding my arms forward, it looks as if my hands would want about a 30-35 degree angle.

  28. #28
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    I dunno

    Quote Originally Posted by donkey
    I wanted to like mine, but sold for the same reasons you mentioned, so you're not alone.

    However, I think the bars are a great idea if they work for you.

    B
    Maybe it has something to do with skill level. If you guys are Norba class riders then maybe this system isn't aggressive enough for you. This is obviously the very opposite of a Norba set-up.
    It took me a while to get used to the bars. I mean, I was instantly comfortable on them. But, it uses completely different muscle groups from a standard flat bar. It just took a little while to develop these muscles. I feel quite at home on them now. Am I faster with these bars? Am I slower? I have no idea. I know that my hands don't go numb as much. I know that I feel like I am doing a Superman when I ride my flat bar now. And I know I can beat my buddies riding thier Norba-style bikes in the single track :-D (the flats are a completely different story, dang gearies)
    All that said, I am not sure how well I would like these bars on a gearie set-up. Especially since there are less places to put all of the shifters and stuff. I love them on the SS though.

    Moto

  29. #29
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    Answers

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Do you all like the Jones cork grips?

    Do you think that the 45 degree angle is ideal, or would you prefer a different angle? Holding my arms forward, it looks as if my hands would want about a 30-35 degree angle.
    1. The cork grips are very nice. Super light and they don't get all sweaty. The outsides of mine are getting scuffed up from rubbing them on trees and whatnot. But, I think that is pretty standard

    2. I like the 45degree sweep. He can build you any sweep you want (obviously). If you live in Toronto you are more than welcome to try my bike out.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Do you all like the Jones cork grips?
    I didn't know about his cork grips at the time when I bought my bars. So I just used roadie cork tape and have been happy.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Do you think that the 45 degree angle is ideal...
    I do think it's ideal. I have been tinkering with alternative handlebars for mtn biking over the past 2 years. I have a thumb injuring and regular bars didn't feel good after my thumb healed. I have ridden Nitto Moustache bars and even tried townie type handlebars and even beach cruiser bars. Briefly road WTB dirtdrops too.
    I think 30-35 deg would probably work too. But I would avoid anything that comes close to being almost completely swept back at 90 degrees, the Vand Dessel moustache bars come close to this bad sweep.
    The Jones H-bar just feel good and comfortable, while offering better bike control and handling. I've been riding for 15 years now (road and dirt) and the Jones bars are one of my favorite bike products (up there with hydro disc brakes, full suspension, and HID lights and numbnuts friendly saddles).
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  31. #31
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    Feel free to email me directly if you have more questions about the Jones H-bars.

    [email protected]
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walt
    ... I think the problem for really rough terrain and steep stuff is that instead of resisting the impacts of rocks and such (which are trying to pull the bars out of your hands in one direction or the other) by pushing and pulling (as if you're holding onto the bar on a rowing machine) with your elbows bent at *approximately* right angles, you have to kind of "cling" to the bars and resist those trail impacts using your shoulders and pecs, much moreso than your biceps/triceps. I found that this didn't work ergonomically for me at ALL. Comfortable does not necessarily equal workable - if it were, I'd be riding a recumbent on the singletrack these days.

    I think it's also interesting to note that offroad motorcycles (on which handling and control ergonomics are at a premium, since the bikes provide plenty of motive force) typically have bars with sweep about the same as mountain bikes (ie <15 degrees). If there were a real ergonomic advantage, I would think that moto folks would have started using something similar, since there's LOTS of innovation in that industry and much less emphasis on lightweight parts (don't get me started on the AMA weight limits, they're just as stupid as the UCI ones). Generally, though, the only bars with lots of sweep you'll find are on older bikes from the 1970s and such...

    Or maybe I'm just the odd man out. Wouldn't be the first time!

    -Walt
    Walt, after riding motos and mtbs with "straight" bars for so long I can see how you could have problems with the Jones-type bars or dropbars off road.

    I have been using various dropbars since 1984 and have used them full-time since 1988.
    Now I can not use "straight" bars for more than 30 minutes without my hands, wrists, elbows and shoulders suffering and I have trouble maintaining control in the rough. Feels like my thumbs are being ripped off so I have to increase my grip and/or rotate my wrists down. This causes me to lock my elbows and all of the shock is transmitted full force through all my joints and into my shoulders.

    With drops my joints are in a more natural position to absorb the shock and maintain my grip on the bars without undue effort. Bumps drive my hands into the curve of the drop for better stability. I can also keep one finger on the brake lever without compromising control or my grip. In the rough, in turns and descents I drop down "into" the bars. Gives me a very secure and swoopy feel. I always feel like I am perched on top of "straight" bars. I get this feeling with the Jones bars, too. They work very well for me on the flats/straights and climbing but I never feel like I am riding "in" them (would also prefer a 20-30° out flare rather than 45°. Jeff will change that if you want).

    I do everything on dropbars: trials, DH, XC, whatever.

    As for Motos and different bar shapes: you do not change your hand position on a moto, Have to be able to control the throttle all of the time and there is a HUGE weight difference.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Do you all like the Jones cork grips?

    Do you think that the 45 degree angle is ideal, or would you prefer a different angle? Holding my arms forward, it looks as if my hands would want about a 30-35 degree angle.
    I like Cinelli Cork Ribbon.

    Prefer 25-30°. Would also make the forward extension more useful. Jeff can do what you what.
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  34. #34
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    On a different note...

    When I put my hand on the flat bar I tend to rotate my palms out. In my BMX days I had a set of Powerlite bars that had a forward bend to them in the middle of the grip. I liked these alot and am supprised that they aren't around anymore. That said...the Jones bars seem like they would be comfortable but I doubt my technical skill while riding in that position. He obviously has no problem as evident by the footage on his site.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.F.L.
    I tried to mount a set on my gearie. I guess they're not really meant for geared bikes...
    I run my H-bars on my gearie bike.

    The best shifters to use for geared bikes are 2 options:
    - Thumbies (cheap Sunrace $12 or pricey Pauls/Shimano combo $90)
    - Shimano XT or XTR dual control shifters

    Jeff runs both setups and likes them.

    I run the cheap Sunrace shifters that can be ordered online for $12. You have to run them friction though. If you want indexed shifting, then go the Pauls Thumbie mount route combo'd with Shimano barcon shifters. Light too, 133g shifters.

    I really dig my thumbies. No mishifts and you can shave to get zero chain rub.

    The only drawback with thumbies is that they are slow to operate in friction setting. So bad for racing. But for everyday riding, I find them a joy to use.

    Here's a closeup shot of my layout:
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  36. #36
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    Are these of any interest to you H-bar users? Sorry for the Spammage....I thought I'd check with you guys here first before I throw them in the classifieds.

    Ones a 130, the other a 140.
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    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by unibomber
    When I put my hand on the flat bar I tend to rotate my palms out. In my BMX days I had a set of Powerlite bars that had a forward bend to them in the middle of the grip. I liked these alot and am supprised that they aren't around anymore. That said...the Jones bars seem like they would be comfortable but I doubt my technical skill while riding in that position. He obviously has no problem as evident by the footage on his site.
    I loved those powerlite bars.

  38. #38
    Nat
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    OKAY, just placed my order for one pair of curved extension H-Bars! Now I'm going to be looking out the window all week, waiting for the delivery truck. Maybe I should just drive down to Medford and pick them up? Thanks again for all the info guys.

  39. #39
    Kill your... television
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    If you are going to Medford...

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    OKAY, just placed my order for one pair of curved extension H-Bars! Now I'm going to be looking out the window all week, waiting for the delivery truck. Maybe I should just drive down to Medford and pick them up? Thanks again for all the info guys.
    Go test ride one of his bikes. Get the guy out of the shop and make him go for a ride...

  40. #40
    Sofa King We Todd Did
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    I'm sure that Jeff Jones holds a patent on the design of these handlebars, but I'm more than a bit surprised that no one else has jumped in to offer variation of these H-bars with similar hand positions. Maybe not everybody needs an H-bar made out of titanium. Walt made one out of steel, ffs.

  41. #41
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpinWheelz
    I'm sure that Jeff Jones holds a patent on the design...
    Jeff has a patent pending.

    There have been similar bars made in the past.
    mtbtires.com
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpinWheelz
    I'm sure that Jeff Jones holds a patent on the design....
    Jeff does have a patent pending, but it's not for every aspect of the design. I don't recall the specifics, but it was posted in a previous thread on the H-bar. Don't quote me on this, but I think it had something to do with the design of the three tubes and how they are joined together. I don't think the patent covers the 45 degree sweep because there have been many bars in the past and present that have a 45-ish sweep (cruiser bars, townie, English 3 speed bars, Dirt Drops, etc....).

    On-One is coming out with a new dirt drop. I also read a post here on mtbr that they have something sort of like the H-bar coming out aswell, but I have not seen any pics of the prototype.

    As for steel, my H-bars are steel and I like the feel of them. Jeff is thinking about making a light cromo version in the future that's more affordable than Ti. But like I mentioned, it's something down the line when he has time, which isn't any time soon because he's busy with his Ti frames and H-bar orders.
    Give me a big scoop of Manteca!

  43. #43
    Nat
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    My how quickly things change...

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    OKAY, just placed my order for one pair of curved extension H-Bars! Now I'm going to be looking out the window all week, waiting for the delivery truck. Maybe I should just drive down to Medford and pick them up? Thanks again for all the info guys.
    My how quickly things change...

    Here's a link to a thread from not too long ago in which I poo-poo both H-Bars and singlespeeding. What a doof.

    Tonight's entree: crow, lightly seasoned and grilled over an open flame.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...73929#poststop
    Last edited by Nat; 11-09-2004 at 09:40 PM.

  44. #44
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    I use Jones H-bars with the curved extensions on my SS. I have Paul Love Levers mounted on the curved bar ends. The H-bars are, without question, the best ergonomic handlebar on the market.

    After playing around to find the proper fit, the setup that works best is a 20mm longer stem and a 5mm shim under the stem for a bit more rise.

    I've tried a variety of grips (Race Face, Oury, Onza, etc..) and cork tape for my hands - my bars seem a little undersized and every rubber grip manages to walk itself off the bar, even with liberal amounts of hairspray.

    The cork tape works great as long as it doesn't get damaged by rubbing it against trees. Cork tape also covers the area where the bar ends meet the horizontal bar, part of the bar where I grab a lot during climbing. Unfortunately, if the cork tape gets damaged, it easily unravels itself from the bars - twisting the cork tape back into place was just a hassle. I'd recommend some lock-on grips (or foam) and be done with it.

    I rarely use the curved end portion of the bars, and I use them only on fast descents. It's a slightly straighter wrist angle than a straight bar, which is better for comfort and absorbing bumps (especially with a rigid fork).

    However, they are far too inboard to be functional for people with wider shoulders. In hindsight, I'd order a custom H-bar with the straight ends with a shallower (more outboard) angle.

    Nonetheless, a great product that's well worth the money.

  45. #45
    Ebo
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    Hi Nat. What kind of SS are you building? Also, rigid or suspension?

  46. #46
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ebo
    Hi Nat. What kind of SS are you building? Also, rigid or suspension?
    Hey Eric. I recently converted an old Haro frame. I'll be buying either a Rig or Karate Monkey by spring, because I'm fascinated by 29ers. How about you?
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  47. #47
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    Hey wait look !!!

    There used to be H-bars on swedish brand Itera bikes in the 80's
    They were made from plastic in a far remote place up north
    The whole project was sponsored by the government and was
    shut down cause the bikes didn't sell to good, wonder why?

    They are however these days a desired design-classic cause
    very few are left in good condition.
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  48. #48
    Ebo
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    Morning Nat. How's the little one's? I converted an older M2 Stumpjumper a little over a year ago. It started out with a Manitou SX-R, but has since been replaced by a Kona P2 which works well for out of the saddle climbing. As you recall, I enjoy the rigid rides as long as its not too damn extreme. I also started out with an old derailleur, which worked well, and then switched over to a Singleator. Then I picked up a NOS 180mm XT M737 5 bolt crankset on Ebay. Saved the rings it came with for my geared bikes. Bought a nice Spot 32t ring, 18t Shimano bmx cog, and a new PC68 chain with a Spicer half link. Pretty reliable so far. I also use the Salsa Pro Moto 26" flat bar with bar ends like Sparty's set up. Those Jones bars look pretty useful from what I can tell and you will like them I'm sure. SSing is fun for sure. Just need to get back in better form. Time to get the kids to school. Take care and give us some feedback when those wacky bars come in..

  49. #49
    Sofa King We Todd Did
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ebo
    I converted an older M2 Stumpjumper a little over a year ago. It started out with a Manitou SX-R, but has since been replaced by a Kona P2 which works well for out of the saddle climbing. As you recall, I enjoy the rigid rides as long as its not too damn extreme. I also started out with an old derailleur, which worked well, and then switched over to a Singleator. Then I picked up a NOS 180mm XT M737 5 bolt crankset on Ebay. Saved the rings it came with for my geared bikes. Bought a nice Spot 32t ring, 18t Shimano bmx cog, and a new PC68 chain with a Spicer half link. Pretty reliable so far. I also use the Salsa Pro Moto 26" flat bar with bar ends like Sparty's set up.
    Terribly sorry to derail this thread for a second here, but Ebo, I just finished up a singlespeed conversion of a similar frame - an M2 Stumpjumper - and would love to see pictures of yours as a means of some rudimentary comparison.

    Back to your regularly scheduled program, thank you very much.

  50. #50
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    Wow.

    That may be the ugliest, coolest thing I've ever seen. Looks like a dinosaur in bicycle form!

    It's worth noting that most "rice rocket" type motorcycles also feature what is essentially an h-bar design, albeit one that uses clamps for the ends, rather than welding them.

    -Walt

  51. #51
    Ebo
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    I'm not much of a camera guy, but my wife has a digital camera and I'll attempt a pic and post maybe tonight when she gets home. The M2 was and still is a fine frame and worked out as a great SS conversion. It's stiff for sure, which makes it a good, efficient climber. Next I need to put a beefier tire up front to soften things up.

  52. #52
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    my jones h-bar experience

    Hello

    I recently took delivery of my Jones bike 29er geared with curved H-bar. I've recently begun to convert it to SS for fun. Here are my first hand impressions of the H bar.

    1). So far in all situations I've found the H bar to be comfortable. uphills, downhills, flats. I have gone down steep hills with my rear end over the tire. Not prolonged drops, just normal ones.
    2). The angle of the bar was pretty much instantly comfortable. There really was no transition time.
    3). The cork grips and tape work well. In VERY narrow places you may hit the end of the cork grip on a tree and rip it. I have hit mine a couple times. But the bars are pretty wide so it is to be expected. In normal singletrack I havne't worried about it.
    4). The multiple hand positions are real. More hand positions than a road bar I think. All have a use sometime. I typically hold on at the cork grips, and for uphill slide fwd to the intersection to get extra pulling power.
    5). I use the curved part whn I am just puttering along. I can get the sti levers over the curves no problem.
    6). No problem popping wheelies or my own pathetic bunny hops, or trying to ride a wheelie.
    7). I've used STI with these bars and worked just fine. With gripshift I don't think so. I think I'll try a thumbie on the rear when I want to do gears and will be a quick changeover.
    8). I've had no problem riding my bike at my 100% limit in full control.
    9). The fact the bars cost me $200 really have no bearing on my comments. If they didn't work I'd say so and hopefully prevent soeone else from making a mistake. But quite the opposite they work fine. I do wish they had the possibility for gripshifting. But hey, that is just the way it is. Sincd Jeff does custom work, maybe he will come up with a gripshift model.
    10). Oh yeah. One more benefit. Since you use a long stem with the bars, you will NEVER bash your knee on a bar, even at very sharp turn.

    Thanks,
    Bob

  53. #53
    Appalachian Singletrack'n
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    Funny you would mention that I have a motorcycle and was noticing last night that my hand position on that bike is almost identical to my SS with the Jones bar.

    Ill skip the "Rice" comment.
    Last edited by Endomaniac; 11-11-2004 at 11:18 AM.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabe
    I have a pair (steel) that I'll part with for $50+shipping.
    I'll take em if you still got em.

    brianjrobinson(at)hotmail
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  55. #55
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    Frank, please don't promote sales without classifieds ads that way.
    Also, I wanted that bar BAD, and I'm quite sure I was next in line for one.
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  56. #56
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    I'll send you one of our Mary bars when we get them Cloxxxi :-)

  57. #57
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    I'm going to need to look up these Mary bars somewhere. Otherwise, if you've got pics to post, please share away, Brant.

    In any case, I was looking around and was wondering what the Jones H-bars get you in terms of basic hand positioning - when you grip them at the ends - that Nitto bars like these don't (they'd be flipped upside down, naturally). I mean, the Jones bars give you a 90-degree grip angle, and these are said to give you 20-degrees of grip angle. Yeah, maybe a bit more 'cramped', not quite as spread out, but these are also about $25. If I was looking for a grip angle position close to what I might get on the Jones H-bars, would these Nitto bars be poor alternative?

  58. #58
    minister of chaos
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    Frank, please don't promote sales without classifieds ads that way.
    Also, I wanted that bar BAD, and I'm quite sure I was next in line for one.
    Sorry Cloxxi,

    I knew it was wrong, but I got greedy. What makes it worse is that I've got the ti ones on the way already. Should have them tomorrow, I hope.

    Frank
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