Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    horizontally compliant
    Reputation: Simpleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    360

    Indoor trainer for standing & mashing

    My current (lower-end fluid) trainer sucks at simulating a 30-50 RPM steep hill climbs. There's just not enough resistance, even in my road bike's biggest gear.

    Do the variable resistance units (such as this one) work better for this? Any recommendations? Oh yeah, I'm pretty frugal too...

    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    ost
    ost is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    31
    i cannot coment on that particular product but i do climbing training on my Cycleops Fluid 2 trainer and in 53:11 on my roadie, anything above about 40rpm will induce agony after a few minutes. i certianly can reccomend the Cycleops, oh and it's not adjustable, not sure if it's price tage will suit you though

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: slingshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    83
    i can't comment on that particular trainer either, but I've been on a 1up for the past few years and i have no complaints. Retail is probably more than you'll want to spend but look around the internet and you can get them for a fair price. I bought mine used and had an issue with the resistance unit soon after. I called them up and they told me to send it back to them no questions asked. They paid for shipping and sent me a brand new one within a few days. Can't beat that for customer service. i haven't had a problem since. It's a lot quieter too then my low end minoura trainer i used to use. You can't adjust the resistance on the fly but for me riding in my big ring on the 29er is plenty. Maybe i'm just that out of shape but what can you do Hope that helps

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SSSasky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    618
    Most trainers are not designed to be used for standing riding - it puts way too much stress on the ends of your axle and the trainer itself. Having sold trainers for a couple of years (a couple hundred trainers total), the only ones I have ever seen come back (only two or three) got damaged from people standing and wrenching the bike side to side. trainers are really made for seated riding.

    If you want to stand and mash, you sort of have two options:
    1) rollers: they give the most natural ride feel, and you can stand and mash as much as you want. You can even crash, just like on the trail. However, rollers generally offer little to no resistance whatsoever out of the box. You usually need to purchase an accessory resistance unit to add to them. At a conservative estimate, expect to spend $300-400, with the option of spending a lot more.

    2) one of the fancy trainer setups that is hinged at the base to allow the bike (and most of the trainer) to swing side to side, to allow the rider to get up and crank the bike more naturally. I remember these becoming available a few years ago. In a quick internet search, I couldn't find any info on them, but I don't remember who makes them. Maybe someone else can chip in. I would guess that these will be fairly pricey again. probably $300 and up.

    My suggestion: learn to love riding your bike outside all year. The hills are still there, and it's a lot more fun than staring at the wall. It's also way easier than most people would imagine. (PS, yes, I live somewhere cold, with lots of snow)

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by SSSasky

    2) one of the fancy trainer setups that is hinged at the base to allow the bike (and most of the trainer) to swing side to side, to allow the rider to get up and crank the bike more naturally. I remember these becoming available a few years ago. In a quick internet search, I couldn't find any info on them, but I don't remember who makes them. Maybe someone else can chip in. I would guess that these will be fairly pricey again. probably $300 and up.

    http://www.kurtkinetic.com/trainers-c-7.html

    Scroll down to the rock and road trainer.

    $360 to $670 on their website..

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    61
    I have a Minoura 850D mag trainer and in the hardest setting in the biggest gear on my roadie (which is 50x12) I pretty much have to stand. It's plenty hard and I've never had a problem with the bike or the trainer.

  7. #7
    i also unicycle
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,043
    why not just get in the gym and do some squats? not huge weights, but high reps. that and keep riding outside if you can. another good winter activity to build leg strength: learn to unicycle. it'll rip you legs and core, plus it's challenging and fun.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    937
    Quote Originally Posted by mdplayer
    http://www.kurtkinetic.com/trainers-c-7.html

    Scroll down to the rock and road trainer.

    $360 to $670 on their website..
    You can't beat the Rock n' Roll trainer!
    Namrita K. O'Dea, MS, RD
    Topeak-Ergon
    Blog
    55nine Performance

  9. #9
    horizontally compliant
    Reputation: Simpleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    360
    Thanks for all your replies. I've found a solution - the YMCA has a spinning bike that I can adjust for a lot of resistance, and they also have a stair master. Between the two I should be able to keep that vein in my forehead stretched out.

    I do ride outside too, but sometimes snow + ice + cold + dark + kids = no outside riding.

    And with rollers I can crash my bike inside my house? Sounds like something I need to look into!


    Simp

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by Simpleton

    And with rollers I can crash my bike inside my house? Sounds like something I need to look into!
    Crashing inside your house is always a good time. Takes a couple sessions to figure it out and keep going in a straight line. The upside is that they aren't as boring as a trainer (can't shut your mind off or you will find yourself no longer on your trainer) and come spring time, you will have a bit better handling skills...

  11. #11
    Welcome to the Gem...
    Reputation: Mallanaga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    811
    i saw a youtube vid of some guy on rollers that simulated a trail of sorts. it was all bumpy and looked bad ass.

    anyone remember that? linky?
    Ibis Tranny 29


  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SSSasky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    618
    You mean this one?

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=AKEHoA_xl-U

    I just came back here to mention the Kurt Kinetic thingy ... but someone beat me to it. So watch the funny video instead.

  13. #13
    Welcome to the Gem...
    Reputation: Mallanaga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    811
    exactly...

    good lookin' out.
    Ibis Tranny 29


Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.