Im new to the Single-speeds- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Why not?
    Reputation: Badmamajama's Avatar
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    Im new to the Single-speeds

    I may not be new to riding, but I am new to single-speeds. I like the look and I'm looking into getting a single-speed for my next rig, the question I have is this, how are they from a All Mountain stand point? I've done some looking but I really cannot find a definitive answer.

    Help please

    Nothing But Glory, and Everything For It.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: homegrown_xt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badmamajama
    I may not be new to riding, but I am new to single-speeds. I like the look and I'm looking into getting a single-speed for my next rig, the question I have is this, how are they from a All Mountain stand point? I've done some looking but I really cannot find a definitive answer.

    Help please
    Welcome aboard, I am new to single speeding too. Just pick a gear ratio that good compromise for hilly terrain and flat terrain and ride the heck out of the bike. As you get stronger you can start changing the size of the cog or the chainring for your level of fitness.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=476484

    Singlespeed is just a type of drivetrain. You can attach it to all sorts of frame/fork/wheel, etc, combinations.

    Singlespeed is pretty good for where and how I ride. I don't have a definitive answer for how it works for you in your environment.

  4. #4
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    Reputation: metrotuned's Avatar
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    Go to Chris King's website. Single speed = always the wrong gear. It is the right gear for me and the those around the 29er/Singlespeed forums ... however, all-mountain doesn't come to mind with one gear. Stick with gears!
    Creative Producer, Will of the Sun, Platform Pedal Shootout 1M+ views WoS

  5. #5
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    It depends on how you define "all mountain". Personally, I think single speed would be awesome for a full suspension all mountain bike because you wouldn't have the chain slapping around. But such a bike doesn't exist (there's the Kona Cowan DS and Lenz Milk Money but they don't have much travel). But if you're talking hardtail, then heck yeah. The only caveat would be that a burlier bike is heavier to pedal up hills, but so what? A little extra pain going up is a fair trade off to avoid chainslap on the way down.

  6. #6
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    All Mountain = All Marketing. An "old fashioned" XC is an all mountain bike. Down hill bikes are for downhilling. Yeah, I'm an old guy. I ride my 1995 Zaskar SS up and down the mountains... "all" parts of the mountain.

  7. #7
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    Check out the Iron deficit thread in the 29er forum and look at what Aquaholic is doing with a rigid single speed. They are nice videos and they put the ALL MOUNTAIN in question...
    Sit and spin my ass...

  8. #8
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    Check out these videos and pictures............

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=471395
    Sit and spin my ass...

  9. #9
    Birthday Collector
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    While I am no big-air style guy by any means, I pretty much ride my SS on everything I come across. Maybe a bit slower down the rocky tech stuff than I would if I had suspension, but I can usually keep the FS guys in sight on most of the reasonably rocky downhills, unless they are REALLY good, or really crazy! I like the feel of rigid for the precise control and steering feel, but also because it makes me slow down a bit for the nastier sections. Keeps my speed to a more reasonable level if I should unload! That said, there are a few times here and there when I am skittering the front wheel through a bumpy turn that I think a bouncy fork might be nice! I agree with the other "old guys" here that "All Mountain" is pretty much old-school XC/Trail riding. Maybe a bit bigger with some of the advancements in suspension and frame materials, but still the same thing concept-wise. I consider myself a "trail rider" and that can be smooth or buff, steep and rocky or anywhere in between. If I can't ride up it, I push up it (SS or gears) and I ride down anything I think I can, and if for some reason I choose not to ride it, then I get down it however I must and keep on riding. The best trails always have some section that I can't ride - or always get part of one time and don't make another!
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  10. #10
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    Reputation: Badmamajama's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I went down to my local BS and they said the best way to find out if i liked SS was to get the conversion kit for about 100, and that comes with a new crank a single gear rear axle and a chain tensioner. I think thats what Ill do and that way instead of buying a new bike.


    Again, Thanks!!

    Nothing But Glory, and Everything For It.

  11. #11
    local trails rider
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    I first tried SS by "remembering not to shift". That convinced me that my local trails are ridable SS, but it is not the same thing. When I converted the bike, it felt much better

  12. #12
    Why not?
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    swet, i know mine are, ive rode most of them on the 1:1 gear on my bike, so that do able i\when you put it that way. Thanks for the tips gents.

    Nothing But Glory, and Everything For It.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badmamajama
    Thanks guys, I went down to my local BS and they said the best way to find out if i liked SS was to get the conversion kit for about 100, and that comes with a new crank a single gear rear axle and a chain tensioner. I think thats what Ill do and that way instead of buying a new bike.


    Again, Thanks!!
    that's a great idea, but $100 sounds steep. you don't need a new crank. you really just need a tensioner, a cog and some spacers.

    for instance, here's a kit for $30: http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...ch_results.cfm

    read the FAQs here if you have any questions about converting a geared bike to SS, it is pretty straight forward, and well documented.

    good luck - the conversion is a great way to get started!

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