I push a bigger gear than you...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    I push a bigger gear than you...

    I thought i'd post an utterly stupid message for my 100th post. can't believe i only have 100 posts after being on this board for 3 or 4 yrs. anyway, that's a monster gear and i wonder about this bike's cruising speed
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  2. #2
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    needs a bash guard.
    Just Passing Through: eatin' dirt & crappin' dust

  3. #3
    SS Clyde 29er
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    im sure its a fixed gear as well, speed w/that ratio...

    Quote Originally Posted by Cygnus
    I thought i'd post an utterly stupid message for my 100th post. can't believe i only have 100 posts after being on this board for 3 or 4 yrs. anyway, that's a monster gear and i wonder about this bike's cruising speed
    on a flat surface or velodrome, id say 50mph plus if he is strong enough to get an rpm of 110 or more. plus..

    if he slicked back his hair with peterolium jelly and put extra bee's wax in his moustashe he could cut his drag coefficient by half im sure, add to that

    extra tight wool socks, rolled up knickers, and a good puff on a cigarette and a shot of scotch and he's good to go for a time trial for sure..

    well..talley ho and toodles good madams and sirs!

  4. #4
    Drinker w/ Riding Problem
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    Oh yeah?

    Oh yeah, yours is bigger...(first photo)
    2nd Mines way bigger
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  5. #5
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    Ok, you win

    Holly crap, the chainring is almost dragging on the ground. Saw a dog like that once. uh, never mind. by the way, spectacular design on the mtb jersey...got my vote.

  6. #6
    used to be uno-speedo....
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    Bring it on!
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  7. #7
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    I just got an idea for my next fixie! Man, have I got a sickness or what?!
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

  8. #8
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    my local shop has one like that on the wall.i just figured it was an old display.it would be great on the long down hills .

  9. #9
    Nat
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    Check out how they used to rake forks backwards. I wonder if that was common (or did they buy those bikes from an early version of Wal-Mart)?
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  10. #10
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    Good job! Bill Murray

    In the white helmet. Used to race track in college!

  11. #11
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by xrmattaz
    In the white helmet. Used to race track in college!
    Haaar! Too funny!

  12. #12
    Boe
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    its for motorpacing behind a vehicle. The inverted raked fork alows you to get closer to the vehicle in front creating really nice drag.

  13. #13
    Whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boe
    its for motorpacing behind a vehicle. The inverted raked fork alows you to get closer to the vehicle in front creating really nice drag.
    Plus they're not as squirrely at high speed (50+ mph) on a steeply banked velodrome. Those are motorpacing bikes for use behind a derny. In the 1890's folks would ride bikes like this behind trains where they'd lay plywood inbetween train tracks. A guy named "mile a minute Murphy" hit 60mph before 1900 this way!

  14. #14
    Needed Less ~ Did More
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    Really good story...

    For those who want to read about motorpacing and super big gearing....really inspiring story, makes me want to go out and ride a century every day

    https://www.63xc.com/ahands/meiffret.htm



    Alex
    "Put any one on one of these singlespeed bikes and they could not help but have fun"
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    Otis Guy talking about klunkers c1976

  15. #15
    el cheapo
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    Is there any real reason other than the stress on the chain to use such massive gearing rather than a smaller, but comprable, gear ratio? I ride a 25t ring up front and a 14t in the rear. Its only slightly harder than a 32t up front and a 18t in the rear but it looks worlds different. Any thoughts? There seems to be a big difference in trends here. BMX riders wanting smaller gearing (25:9 instead of the traditional 44:16) which is where I got the 25:14 from, and MTB and Road riders wanting bigger, as if trying to prove something. If I wanted a higher gear I would simply go down as far as possible in the rear before expanding in the front (9t cogs are available in the BMX world and 8t have been produced, I don't know if they're available yet.) I only know of 22t sprockets available for my BMX style cranks so I certainly wouldnt want to go any lower, but for conversation, any thoughts?

    *edit* here is a pic 25:14 with my chetto rigged temporary wheel. I replaced it yesterday with a proper set up!
    I am CHEAP

  16. #16
    Tig
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    Not bigger, but faster

    The double reduction allows for even larger gear ratio, and without the problems (aerodynamics, large ring/multiple tooth friction) of a giant chain ring. Good enough for 152 MPH by John Howard. I like the more natural unpaced records myself.

    <img src="http://www.canosoarus.com/08LSRbicycle/Bicycle%20Images/John%20BkStand.JPG">

    <img src="http://www.canosoarus.com/08LSRbicycle/Bicycle%20Images/152%20in%20tow.JPG">

    Here's the bike that held the record of 138 MPH until Howard broke it.

    <img src="http://www.canosoarus.com/08LSRbicycle/Bicycle%20Images/Doug%20138Bk.JPG">
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  17. #17
    Homey don't play that!
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    Quote Originally Posted by brado1
    Oh yeah, yours is bigger...(first photo)
    2nd Mines way bigger
    The cop bikes must be pursuit vehicles.

  18. #18
    Needed Less ~ Did More
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    BMXers like small cogs as they are out of the way of wall-grinds and other silly stuff they do, smaller cogs wear faster as there are less chain rollers / teeth taking the load. Plus any out-of-round on the cogs / freewheel will show up as a big difference in the tight and loose spots (makes getting the chain tension even a night mare!)

    Bigger cogs spread the load, wear slower and run quieter and more evenly (great on a fixie where you want the chain tight all the way round) I have recently fitted a 34/18 and this is the smallest I have been for a while, 36t+ until then!

    Alex

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeCordell
    Is there any real reason other than the stress on the chain to use such massive gearing rather than a smaller, but comprable, gear ratio? I ride a 25t ring up front and a 14t in the rear. Its only slightly harder than a 32t up front and a 18t in the rear but it looks worlds different. Any thoughts? There seems to be a big difference in trends here. BMX riders wanting smaller gearing (25:9 instead of the traditional 44:16) which is where I got the 25:14 from, and MTB and Road riders wanting bigger, as if trying to prove something. If I wanted a higher gear I would simply go down as far as possible in the rear before expanding in the front (9t cogs are available in the BMX world and 8t have been produced, I don't know if they're available yet.) I only know of 22t sprockets available for my BMX style cranks so I certainly wouldnt want to go any lower, but for conversation, any thoughts?

    *edit* here is a pic 25:14 with my chetto rigged temporary wheel. I replaced it yesterday with a proper set up!
    "Put any one on one of these singlespeed bikes and they could not help but have fun"
    -
    Otis Guy talking about klunkers c1976

  19. #19
    Recovering couch patato
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  20. #20
    Whatever
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    Another reason: acceleration vs high speed (cadence)

    Quote Originally Posted by Singlespeedpunk
    BMXers like small cogs as they are out of the way of wall-grinds and other silly stuff they do, smaller cogs wear faster as there are less chain rollers / teeth taking the load. Plus any out-of-round on the cogs / freewheel will show up as a big difference in the tight and loose spots (makes getting the chain tension even a night mare!)

    Bigger cogs spread the load, wear slower and run quieter and more evenly (great on a fixie where you want the chain tight all the way round) I have recently fitted a 34/18 and this is the smallest I have been for a while, 36t+ until then!

    Alex
    As a track rider for almost 20 years...where guys change gears for tenths of seconds...the above can be taken a bit further. Sprinters tended to ride 47x14 while the endurance trackies (madison riders) rode 54x16. 47x14 is 90.6" while 54x16 is 91.1". Virtually the same...but the endurance riders thought it was more efficient, while sprinters thought the small cogs accelerated faster. Shimano took this concept to the extreme with the old "ten pitch" track stuff for Keirin racers in the 80's. Everything was tiny...10mm between chain links (about 1/2 size of bmx/track chains).

    I ride a 46x24 but that's the same as a 36x19 roughly.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tig
    The double reduction allows for even larger gear ratio, and without the problems (aerodynamics, large ring/multiple tooth friction) of a giant chain ring. Good enough for 152 MPH by John Howard. I like the more natural unpaced records myself.

    <img src="http://www.canosoarus.com/08LSRbicycle/Bicycle%20Images/John%20BkStand.JPG">

    <img src="http://www.canosoarus.com/08LSRbicycle/Bicycle%20Images/152%20in%20tow.JPG">

    Here's the bike that held the record of 138 MPH until Howard broke it.

    <img src="http://www.canosoarus.com/08LSRbicycle/Bicycle%20Images/Doug%20138Bk.JPG">
    Do the rules of the ecord preclude a recumbent? A fixed recumbent could easily be geared way muther father high. As long as you don't have to stop real fast.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

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