I love single speed but yesterday made me think strongly- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    I love single speed but yesterday made me think strongly

    I rode some awesome trails yesterday with some friends of mine. I was the only one on a single speed and the only one riding rigid. There was almost 800 feet of elevation gain and it was a 12 mile ride. Awesome single tracks with lots of switchback and some sand traps and creek crossings with sharp switchbacks immediately into a 5 degree climb. I did ok until the last couple miles. They left me and I started to really suffer. I had to stop every 100 feet and catch wind. I was sweating out more than the water I was taking in. And things were starting to get dizzy briefly. I pushed my bike most the way out the last 2 miles and only rode on any downhill stuff. Truth is I was so exhausted that even the downhill stuff was whipping my ass. I was out of gas! I told my friends later that I was out of shape and they said I was in excellent shape to hang with them as long as I did on a single speed! They really made me feel awesome but truth is, I am considering gears. I feel like my ride was more of a workout than an enjoyable experience. One of these fellas was a tad overweight and told me at first to go ahead of him cause he was slow. He was slow but he was waiting at the end with the rest of them for me! Anyone else felt this dilema before? I am seriously thinking of going gears down the road. And buying a new bike is not in the budget so that's not an option.

  2. #2
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    I wouldn't let ONE ride change your mind. Go ride it again when you know you are 100% and have the correct amount of food intake/water. I have off days where I am just not 100% and want to stop riding. Other days I am red hot fast w/ little to no fatigue.

    I say ride some more, and learn how to attack and improve. If...after a few rides you still feel the same way, buy a different bike w/ gears.

  3. #3
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    A classic bonk, most of us have been there.

    There's one sure fire way to find out if you prefer trail riding with gears, can you borrow a bike from a friend? Going to a geared bike isn't a sign of weakness or failure IMO. SS's aren't for everyone, especially as an only bike.

  4. #4
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    Go ride those trails more on your SS!

  5. #5
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    I started riding rigid singlespeeds about a year ago and have learned a lot. I used to struggle when I started out and thought the bikes were a HUGE disadvantage. I didn't think it was possible to keep up with geared riders. I've kept at it though and am now one of the fastest on the local trails. Also started racing it against geared riders and have been finishing very well.

    Here's a few things I've learned over this fairly short amount of time. I'm assuming you haven't been riding consistently for a long time:

    It takes oyur body a while to adapt. It took me a few months for both my lower and upper body to adapt, especially on the rough trails.

    If funds allow, you need to make your bike light, especially in the wheels. That's one of the biggest advantages of a rigid singlespeed. If you're riding a 30 pounds rigid singlespeed and your friends are on 25 pound full suspension carbon bikes, it's going to be tough to keep up.

    Have you experimented with lower gearing? It's OK to spin out on the flats if you have technical trails or steep climbs. It may feel slow, but you'll actually be a lot faster if you have a decent amount of climbs and you have an efficient gear for them.

    Also, in group rides it's usually best for singlespeeds to lead. Rides are much tougher if you're stuck behind people who are spinning up hills forcing you to slowly mash your way up.

    Are you running high volume tires and good grips? What's the frame material? Not all rigid singlespeeds are created equal. The bike and setup can have a big impact on how much you have to work to keep things under control on a rough trail.

    Something I discovered recently was to ditch the camelbak. You should be standing 90% of the time on a singlespeed, which means you'll be supporting the full weight of a pack. It's not like you can sit and rest like on a full suspension bike. If you haven't already, add tools and water to the bike and keep your body as light as possible.

    When riding with geared riders, it's difficult to not try to match their pace on the flats. This is the time for you to rest and recover for the next climb.

  6. #6
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    I ride singlespeed FOR the workout. I ain't need no stinkin' gears.

    Quote Originally Posted by coke View Post
    If funds allow, you need to make your bike light, especially in the wheels. That's one of the biggest advantages of a rigid singlespeed. If you're riding a 30 pounds rigid singlespeed and your friends are on 25 pound full suspension carbon bikes, it's going to be tough to keep up.
    I agree. I recently switched from a steel frame weighing in around 35lbs to a 20lb bike and the difference in stamina gains was huge.

    Quote Originally Posted by coke View Post
    Something I discovered recently was to ditch the camelbak. You should be standing 90% of the time on a singlespeed, which means you'll be supporting the full weight of a pack. It's not like you can sit and rest like on a full suspension bike. If you haven't already, add tools and water to the bike and keep your body as light as possible.
    I ride in Florida. This isn't an option. <30oz of water on a hour+ long ride just isn't going to be enough. I need the 2L hydration pack, and I would never recommend putting yourself in a place where you're without water. I also recommend some energy chews or goo in case you do bonk.

  7. #7
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    I'd like to know what your gearing is. I ride a 36 x 16 and at times, I completely run out of gas too. I think every SS rider has had that experience. Hell, I had that on a road ride once when the wind was brutal and I felt like I was barely moving.

    It also sounds like you're being too hard on yourself. It's likely the trails you rode would be brutal for any of us on your bike. Look at your gearing, pace yourself better, and you'll likely have a better run next time.

  8. #8
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    Maybe try an easier gear.

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  9. #9
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    Consider this failure of a ride as your next goal to conquer! Don't let it conquer you! Apply the sage advice others have given hear and keep riding this trail until you conquer it. Focus on the trail, not your buddies.


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  10. #10
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    34x20. Bike weighs 25 lbs with good wheels and light steel frame. Yes I was getting stuck behind them and was having to slow down. They offered to let me pass but honestly I was afraid of being rude. I sweated out way more than bottle of water. We stopped once and I refilled my pack.

  11. #11
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    don't let one ride get you down. it will just take a bit more practice on that same trail and maybe a lower gear. buy another cog/freewheel +2 teeth in the rear. it's kind of a pain to swap gears for one ride but if it's nearly unridable as is, it's a necessary evil. i also agree that leading will make your day easier.

    ditching the camelbak is not an option, sounds like you needed more water than you had.

    i recently moved and now the closest park to me is extremely rough terrain. rocky rooty, loose over hardpack etc. with lots of climbing. the first time or two going through there on a rigid SS was a bit scary, it requires your full attention even with suspension and gears. but after doing it a few times, learning the trails better, getting in better shape, and generally getting a better feel for it, i am now as fast or faster through most of it than my geared friends, with the exception of a few rough downhill sections.

    if your in decent shape a gear change and a bit of practice should go a long way.

    how often are you going to be doing this ride? if it's only once in a while then getting a whole new bike seems unnecessary. try a new gear first. and remember, what doesn't kill you...

    the only other option is to convince all your friends to come over to the dark side!
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  12. #12
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    Well I wasn't expecting all this encouragement and it is making me reconsider. I built this bike and started with 32x20 but it was too Damm low and I spun on flats too bad.

    One of the guys made a good point even though there was a spin. I must not be in too bad of shape to do what I had done and if i had gears yesterday I could have finished with the group due to mechanical advantage.

    These were all Facebook friends that shared my love for the sport but I had never met. I went to this trail for the first time to ride alone and met up with these fellas and found out later who it was I had ridden with. Small world huh?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    34x20. Bike weighs 25 lbs with good wheels and light steel frame. Yes I was getting stuck behind them and was having to slow down. They offered to let me pass but honestly I was afraid of being rude. I sweated out way more than bottle of water. We stopped once and I refilled my pack.
    yeah I always make it point to climb first on SS. No sense wasting more energy going slower behind people spinning smaller gears.

  14. #14
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    Where I ride, there is typically quite a bit more climbing in a 12 mile ride than that. I find the more climbing, the easier it is for me to stay with the geared guys I ride with. Most of the time I wait for them at the top!

    So the way I see it you bonked. You are probably a little out out of shape and you were more than likely dehydrated which is the bigger cause if the problem.

    Keep at it, get in shape and even more importantly, take care of your body! You can definitely keep up with geared guys.

  15. #15
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    fast flats are the enemy of SS.

  16. #16
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    oh yeah, a pre-ride clif bar and a couple gels while riding won't hurt either.
    Rigid SS 29er
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    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  17. #17
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    Group rides mixing SS and geared can be tricky because the bikes tend to be ridden fast in different places.

    I've ridden with guys who were going just slightly faster than I could really cope with. I was feeling pretty dead by the time I admitted it to myself and told them to continue without me. Then I had a good time picking my own way home, at my pace...

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Group rides mixing SS and geared can be tricky because the bikes tend to be ridden fast in different places.

    I've ridden with guys who were going just slightly faster than I could really cope with. I was feeling pretty dead by the time I admitted it to myself and told them to continue without me. Then I had a good time picking my own way home, at my pace...
    This^^^^^ I definitely didn't want to hold them back

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BENKD29 View Post
    oh yeah, a pre-ride clif bar and a couple gels while riding won't hurt either.
    What is gels referring too?

  20. #20
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    All good tips posted

    Just keep at it.
    I run 32x20 sometimes a 19 in the back.
    On my Thursday night ride, which has 15-25 people in it, average about 4 SS'ers. It's normally lead by a SS rider, he is geared 32x20 and he isn't slow.

    Yes flats kill us SS'ers but we own 90% of the climbs

    I have found in most the group rides here. They have meet up places during the ride. So everyone can regroup. Kind of the point of it being a group ride. No man left behind.
    So for those on a SS who are being left behind and end up riding solo. Maybe its time to find a new group
    Too Many .

  21. #21
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    energy gels. you can get them anywhere, grocery store, bike shop, or online.

    The best energy gels - Cycling Weekly
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by brent701 View Post
    All good tips posted

    Just keep at it.
    I run 32x20 sometimes a 19 in the back.
    On my Thursday night ride, which has 15-25 people in it, average about 4 SS'ers. It's normally lead by a SS rider, he is geared 32x20 and he isn't slow.

    Yes flats kill us SS'ers but we own 90% of the climbs

    I have found in most the group rides here. They have meet up places during the ride. So everyone can regroup. Kind of the point of it being a group ride. No man left behind.
    So for those on a SS who are being left behind and end up riding solo. Maybe its time to find a new group
    I understand what your saying. These guys waited for me. I didn't expect them too but they were,at the exit waiting and super cool about everything.

  23. #23
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    It's a bike, not a religion.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    It's a bike, not a religion.
    its not just a bike, it's a single speed!
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  25. #25
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    When I'm on my ss I usually lead because all but one of the regulars are slow spiny climbers. And it's to painful to try to climb behind them.


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  26. #26
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    Try an Oval ring up front ^^

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  27. #27
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    +1 for the oval ring, but I think two more teeth in back would also be a good idea. Ovals are nice, but the benefits are kinda subtle.

    Then go back to the same trail, relax on the flats so you don't spin out or burn much energy, and focus on the climbs. Repeat weekly until you're no longer feeling beaten.

  28. #28
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    I went back to 32x20 tonight when I got home. It is a much noticeable difference than the 34x20. I am going to keep trying. I still have my 18 cog riding right beside it so I can switch to 32x18 at any time with my crank bros multi tool for less hilly rides. Those trails yesterday are an hour 25 away from me so when I get another chance I am going back up.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    I went back to 32x20 tonight when I got home. It is a much noticeable difference than the 34x20. I am going to keep trying. I still have my 18 cog riding right beside it so I can switch to 32x18 at any time with my crank bros multi tool for less hilly rides. Those trails yesterday are an hour 25 away from me so when I get another chance I am going back up.
    Your 34x20 is like a 32x18.5
    32x20 is nice on climbs kind of sucks on flats though. but is a good all round ratio, imo
    Too Many .

  30. #30
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    Does your frame have the option to add a derailleur to it?

    My Lurcher does. So I don't know what Iowa summers are like but here in Texas I can't really hang with the SSs during summer. So I'll just do the 1x10 thing until fall and switch it back to SS. Maybe you can try that?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Awshucks View Post
    Does your frame have the option to add a derailleur to it?

    My Lurcher does. So I don't know what Iowa summers are like but here in Texas I can't really hang with the SSs during summer. So I'll just do the 1x10 thing until fall and switch it back to SS. Maybe you can try that?
    Yes it does but it would be a pain to constantly remove derailleur and shifter and cable. Eventually threads strip out lol

  32. #32
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    You could also add a derailleur and not shift. At least, not until you get bonked again.

    Yeah it's cheating but if you're going to push your limits, there's no shame in having a backup plan for those times that you exceed them.

  33. #33
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    On the occasions that I ride with a group, it is usually the result of me posting on a local forum, stipulating that pace will be relaxed. My invite -> I lead. There's one or two steep and bumpy uphills where I tell gearie riders to go first because they have a chance to make it without walking. Only the best ones generally do make it.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  34. #34
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    I wouldn't worry about it too much. You haven't been riding that long (remember your build thread) and you're still gaining strength and stamina. Yeah, that ride sounds like it hurt, but I'd say there's some good advice scattered through this thread. Take some food with you next time, and don't be afraid to stop and eat. Regarding water, don't sacrifice the amount of water you can carry with you for the sake of weight. You can adjust a lot of things to carry more weight, but if you run out of water your ride is basically over, and it's probably a bit obvious, but I'll say it anyway, running out of water can be a serious problem. I regularly pack a 3L hydration pack AND two 25oz bottles of gatorade on the frame, because I know I sweat a lot, and I'm more vulnerable to dehydration than average, for whatever reason.

    Stick to the SS thing. For me, I rode mine rigid until very recently, when old injuries really started bothering me, so I put a suspension fork on it, and haven't looked back. Rigid was fun, suspension is also fun, but figuring out where to lock it out has added a new element to the ride, and takes away a little of the simplicity. Still, I'm riding the SS, so that's that.

    Mind you, I still have my geared FS bike, and if I know I'm going to be turning a lot of miles, or on a particularly rough trail, or I'm just tired from having already ridden a bunch in the past couple of days, I'll take that out. Stash some more cash and pick up a geared bike if you want one. No need to rush.

  35. #35
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    Maybe a suspension front fork would help too?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by isis07734 View Post
    Maybe a suspension front fork would help too?
    I thought about one in the past but I just can't make myself add weight to my bike. Plus I worry about leaks and maintenance with a squish fork.

  37. #37
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    I love single speed but yesterday made me think strongly

    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    I went back to 32x20 tonight when I got home. It is a much noticeable difference than the 34x20. I am going to keep trying. I still have my 18 cog riding right beside it so I can switch to 32x18 at any time with my crank bros multi tool for less hilly rides. Those trails yesterday are an hour 25 away from me so when I get another chance I am going back up.
    How about a "double-double" setup? I'm running a WI DOS ENO 16/18 with chainring combo of 36-18 and 38-16. For your setup, you could rock the 17/19 version and go with whichever chainring combo suits you,... Just make sure it is a 2 tooth difference. 30/32 up front might be a good spread for your trails.

    The cool thing is that you could do a trail side gear change if desired. I'm running a Surly Singulator, but have etch markings in the pulley axle for each chain line (6mm difference). Works like a charm. Just another option for you here,... Lot easier that swapping SS cogs trail side.


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  38. #38
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    Re: suspension fork. I rode rigid for a number of years & loved it. Then I didn't ride too much for a few years & rode gears & a sus fork during that time. Did not like that at all. Went back to SS this year & started rigid but couldn't stick with it. I know how to ride a rigid bike but the pounding I was enduring led to a ton of fatigue. I switched to a sus fork & learned to do the maintenance myself. My Rockshox solo air SID is very, very easy to work on. As for the additional weight, over the course of a longer ride, you won't notice it but you will notice feeling less beat up & will be able to ride longer as a result. I good lockout is a must, though.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by coke View Post
    Something I discovered recently was to ditch the camelbak. You should be standing 90% of the time on a singlespeed, which means you'll be supporting the full weight of a pack. It's not like you can sit and rest like on a full suspension bike. If you haven't already, add tools and water to the bike and keep your body as light as possible.
    I tried this for the first time in about 17 years and have been pleased with the change. I now use 2 25oz insulated bottles and a small seat bag for tools with gels in my jersey pockets. My backs not soaked with sweat anymore either.

  40. #40
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    I second (or third) the recommendation for investing in a suspension fork. If you have a steel fork, you probably won't be adding much weight. I would really consider this before adding gears (which are also going to add weight to the bike). Unless your trails are really smooth, you'd likely be fast on a single speed with a good suspension fork, than fully rigid and gears.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatDirt View Post
    How about a "double-double" setup? I'm running a WI DOS ENO 16/18 with chainring combo of 36-18 and 38-16. For your setup, you could rock the 17/19 version and go with whichever chainring combo suits you,... Just make sure it is a 2 tooth difference. 30/32 up front might be a good spread for your trails.

    The cool thing is that you could do a trail side gear change if desired. I'm running a Surly Singulator, but have etch markings in the pulley axle for each chain line (6mm difference). Works like a charm. Just another option for you here,... Lot easier that swapping SS cogs trail side.


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    i was thinking the same thing kind of. dingle speed. it would give you two gear ratio's for different types of riding.

    oh and stick with the rigid fork.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  42. #42
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    i don't recommend a suspension fork or messing with your setup becasue of one ride.

    i do recommend going and hitting those trails alone sometime so you know them better and know where the challenging hills/flats etc are so you can prepare for them better. Your first time riding a new place can be challenging. On a singlespeed, if the trerrain is different than what you are used, to it can be even harder. Look at it as a challenge. Bonking and suffering like you did definitely made you stronger for the next time.

  43. #43
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    As the others have already said, don't adjust just because you've had a single bad ride..

    When riding with my geared buddy I try to pick a route with plenty of climbing to keep him in check, if he knows there is a lot of climbing to be done, he relaxes a bit on the flat bits. He went through some surgery last year and insisted on doing what he calls easy routes, skipping a lot of the tougher climbs - those routes wipes me out because he tends to ride the flat bits too fast for me, since he doesn't have to conserve energy for the steep stuff..

    Make sure you relax on the flat bits, that's what they are good for..

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    A classic bonk, most of us have been there.

    There's one sure fire way to find out if you prefer trail riding with gears, can you borrow a bike from a friend? Going to a geared bike isn't a sign of weakness or failure IMO. SS's aren't for everyone, especially as an only bike.
    ^^^^^ My thoughts exactly when I started reading your experience. Nothing that a little more riding and a little more preparedness can't solve.

    Right on, Ride on, Write on!
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by redwarrior View Post
    Re: suspension fork. I rode rigid for a number of years & loved it. Then I didn't ride too much for a few years & rode gears & a sus fork during that time. Did not like that at all. Went back to SS this year & started rigid but couldn't stick with it. I know how to ride a rigid bike but the pounding I was enduring led to a ton of fatigue. I switched to a sus fork & learned to do the maintenance myself. My Rockshox solo air SID is very, very easy to work on. As for the additional weight, over the course of a longer ride, you won't notice it but you will notice feeling less beat up & will be able to ride longer as a result. I good lockout is a must, though.
    I just added a sus fork to my previously rigid ss. I was getting really beat up where I ride--really rocky here. First few rides I actually didn't like it--felt weird and sort of…sluggish. A few weeks in and now I'm digging it, but I'm quickly changing my ride style I notice--I'm bashing into things a lot more! But I AM ripping more on descents now--that was apparent the first time out. So, I am faster it would seem …..

    Anyhow, +1 on the lockout---even though I added about 1lb with this fork the best decision I made was to go for the remote lockout too--I'm using it constantly.

  46. #46
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    I've been riding singlespeeds exclusively for the last 5 years. And I never felt that the bike was holding me back - especially my rigid SS mtb. I always find that if I suck, that's because I'm not fit enought, not scillfull enougth etc. The truth is: the SS mtb with proper gear is quite an efficient machine. It only can take years to master your SS skills and it will always be the place for improvement. Maybe it sounds funny, but mtb SS is more competitive and efficient than road SS/fixedgear (which I also ride). Because on the road you can be forced to spin the wrong cadence for miles, whereas on trail there is no such need (unless you are trying to go as fast as possible on the long flats). The human body can work at a wide range of cadense for short periods of time - that's the case of SS mtb - cadense is varying all the time.
    Maybe my fitness is poor or I don't care about the sheer speed but I'm having great fun on my 4 SS's and also a great workout.

  47. #47
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    Thanks for everything guys! After several days have passed I am feeling excited about my bike again. It is nice having something so maintenance free after all.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaBass_ View Post
    I tried this for the first time in about 17 years and have been pleased with the change. I now use 2 25oz insulated bottles and a small seat bag for tools with gels in my jersey pockets. My backs not soaked with sweat anymore either.
    Gels/food in a Feedbag works well, if you don't wear a jersey like myself. Also can accommodate another bottle for really long rides.

    iowamtb - No disrespect intended here, but 12 miles and 800 ft..... Just sounds like you need to ride more, regardless of gears or not.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by stremf View Post
    ... 12 miles and 800 ft..... Just sounds like you need to ride more, regardless of gears or not.
    Depends...

    The other day I almost threw up after going up the last little hill of 12km / 380m (8 miles and 800ft) in an hour (as counted by phone app).
    ... But I was definitely pushing myself. Backing down the pace a little, it could have been a more relaxed ride, with only moderate huffing and puffing.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Depends...

    The other day I almost threw up after going up the last little hill of 12km / 380m (8 miles and 800ft) in an hour (as counted by phone app).
    ... But I was definitely pushing myself. Backing down the pace a little, it could have been a more relaxed ride, with only moderate huffing and puffing.
    Well, of course; I've also nearly vomited on a shorter ride before, but I was redlining to protect what little dignity I had left on Strava.

  51. #51
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    Some of it could have been due to heat and humidity as it was mid 90s and pretty humid. I started sweating when I got out of my truck before I even started riding. I am a very heavy sweater.

  52. #52
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    It aint the arrow, its the indian.
    Keep working on your fitness, best way to do that?
    Ride.
    Lots...

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    A classic bonk,
    Your dilemma is more about nutrition strategy than gears. You'd have felt the same on a 1x10 I reckon.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    oh yeah, a pre-ride clif bar and a couple gels while riding won't hurt either.
    That's what I'm thinking. In my experience this sounds like a food issue, not a bike issue!
    Ultralight bikepacking and gear lists... MaxTheCyclist.com

  55. #55
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    Depending on the gearing......you could definitely see why you were whooped.

    Don't take this the wrong way, but 800' ascent in 12 miles is pretty damn flat. So if you were running say 32x20+ you were spinning your brains out trying to keep up with geared riders on a flat ride.

    How does it work when you do a ride that has way more climbing on it? How about a ride where you get 100+' ascent per mile.....how do you compare? This is one reason I don't do flat rides with other riders.
    Bicycles don’t have motors or batteries.

    Ebikes are not bicycles

  56. #56
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    To avoid dying on long SS rides, I avoid near-maximum efforts, and spin gently whenever possible. It's not as much fun as all-out riding, but surviving sometimes dictates being as fuel efficient as possible.
    2017 Diamondback Haanjo
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  57. #57
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    My last near-death experiencewhile riding SS was trying to keep up with some geared riders when a good section of the route was a flat, paved bike path. Spinning hurts after a while.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    My last near-death experiencewhile riding SS was trying to keep up with some geared riders when a good section of the route was a flat, paved bike path. Spinning hurts after a while.
    Agreed.

    Slight descents can be crushing trying to keep up with geared guys. Everything else is fine.

    Usually try to draft as much as possible and do lots of little short spinny bursts to stay within the draft.

    Quote Originally Posted by revmatt View Post
    Your dilemma is more about nutrition strategy than gears. You'd have felt the same on a 1x10 I reckon.
    I think it's more about fitness level. I don't think on trail nutrition is even necessary or would have helped for 800 feet and 12 miles. and if it's that's tough on a SS, then it arguably would have been just as difficult on a 1x10.

    Just need to ride more, and SS will make you stronger, faster. and it's more fun!

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by nomit View Post

    I think it's more about fitness level. I don't think on trail nutrition is even necessary or would have helped for 800 feet and 12 miles.
    Agreed, a distinct possibility. Though I had to eat more when starting out than I do now. I find the stronger I've gotten the more I need to fuel, before and during.

  60. #60
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    I always think to myself "what would Rocky do here" and that usually solves the problem.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by iowamtb View Post
    Yes I was getting stuck behind them and was having to slow down. They offered to let me pass but honestly I was afraid of being rude.
    A lot of other good advice in the thread, but having to ride at the natural snail-pace of a geared bike on a climb is ANY single speed rider's bane. Politely get around them and climb at the pace that your body/gearing combo is most efficient. It is almost always at a much faster speed than a sit-and-spin rider. Its just part of the deal. Other riders who are in the know, completely understand and those who aren't in the know can be politely educated by you...

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