I just went rigid and am feeling nervous about the next rides- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 57 of 57
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGenTwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    286

    I just went rigid and am feeling nervous about the next rides

    Ok so I just set up my bike today... Wanted to try out rigid so I got a Kona Project 2 steel fork.

    I went for a ride today at the xc singletrack loop in my trail. This loop features mainly ups and downs with very little flats. Terrain consists of loose soil and some small-mid sized rocks.

    Being the first time doing SS on a trail, it was definitely not a WOW experience. There were many climbs where i could only slowly crank up my way or otherwise having to stop midway to push.

    With a rigid front, my body took alot of shocks. It was definitely a shocking experience though I thought the climbing felt more efficient than with a sus fork on my prev geared setup.

    My hands felt bashed at the end of the trail. Akin to having take the punches of some bully.

    Am now feeling nervous, and weary about tommorow's ride. Any tips or motivation? I know I will have to learn the smooth flow around the track but how the "smooth flow" may not turn out to be so smooth for a newly converted rigid SS rider.

    P.S: SS does feel great on the flats though!

  2. #2
    Squalor
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,574
    Start early and attach climbs...recover on flats...repeat.

    Run your bars high-ish...keep weight back and hands loose...run low psi on fat front tire.

    Have fun.

    LP

  3. #3
    Life is Go0d!
    Reputation: mo0se's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    891
    You literally have to re-learn how to ride again. The two riding styles are polar opposites. Change everything, line choice, body position, air psi, pedaling, etc. the only thing the styles have in common are two wheels. Now you have to participate in the ride, not sit, and zone out. Relax your shoulders, arms, and grip on the bars. Shift your weight slightly to the rear while standing.. (another foreign concept.) when approaching the rough stuff. Your input, dictates the beating you get... so its on you.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  4. #4
    achiever
    Reputation: redwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    929
    Mo0se is right, you have to relearn how to ride. Line choice is a huge factor as is keeping your weight back to keep the front end light.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: byteMe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    27
    Well said,
    Now you have to participate in the ride, not sit, and zone out
    Big (2.35) front tire with low PSI (20) will help with comfort. You will learn to pick lines; what you can't steer around you will hop over ..

  6. #6
    I'm gonna have to kill ya
    Reputation: roybatty666's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    321
    The project 2s are not the most forgiving fork, one of the many carbon forks take the edge off thing a bit more.

    It is mainly technique though,ride light bend your arms and legs and use those as your suspension, shift your body weight about, get your front wheel over the obsticle then shift your body weight forward to lighten the rear so that wafts over it, carry momentum as best you can so even up hill you can stall your pedal stroke as your rear wheel gets to the rock/ root whatever so you don't spin out.

    I also hold the bars less tight than I do on my FS

    It is amasing how quickly you start adapting, I have gone back to Rigid for the first time in 15 years and am loving it, I rarely even notice the lack of front suspension, I have a small 2.1 front with White Bro Carbon forks and Race Face Next SL carbon risers with the latter two taking out some trail buzz

    Stick with it (maybe with a less harsh fork) but don't beat your self up if you go back to suspension it really isn't an issue your riding to enjoy it, no point riding a style that you hate.. It will take a while to adapt but you get a full on all body work out from Rigid SS

  7. #7
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    Great info already. Riding rigid more comfortably will take more ride time so don't give up at the first feeling of pain. There are small changes to your set up that can improve comfort a lot.

    Your hands are very volunerable so the right grips and gloves will make a big difference. Do a search and you'll find numerous threads on grips. Gloves with gel or padding work well too but I'd stray away from the road specific pairs because I found the gel to actually do more harm then good because of its shape and placement. I use some old performance gloves that just have some type of cushioning all over and they work better then any of the newer gloves I have.

    The right bars also help. Carbon does smooth out the ride but be careful with it(Lock on grips+no bar plugs=cracked from my experience). Big Sweep bars can also help loosen you up. Steel bars also "give" more then Alum. so maybe check them out. Having your bars a bit higher also reduces stress on your hands from my experience, although I don't like them too high.

    Lastly, wide, high volume tires. Low psi is your friend. I'd run between 20-25 psi F and R but that also depends on your tire/wheel size. This should help. Just have fun with it, it can work.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MaineSara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    50
    I've been riding rigid ss about 4 months now. I adapted to the ss easily but the rigid was harder. I felt beat up after every ride. I thought I should be getting used to it more quickly but I wasn't. Just recently figured out my tire pressure in the front was way too high (30). Big "duh" moment for me. As soon as I lowered it to 20 I felt like I actually had some suspension. It made a HUGE difference. My back and hands had been hurting and as soon as I did that it stopped.

  9. #9
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,366
    I think low psi/handlebar, etc are important factors, but learning to ride ss rigid will give you the best results. Never lock out your arms (shouldn't do this anyway, but...), and try to carry your body weight with your core muscles. The idea is that the weight on your feet and hands is light and poised. Rather than pedaling through rough stuff and relying on suspension to take the bite off the shock, you have to rely on your body. Keep your hands loose- find a comfortable position that still offers lots of control. I link my forefinger and my thumb, middle finger over the levers and the rest of my hand is fairly slack.

    You'll build up some strength too. It isn't a subtle thing in any case. If it hurts, you did it wrong.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    143

    two tips

    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    Ok so I just set up my bike today... Wanted to try out rigid so I got a Kona Project 2 steel fork.

    I went for a ride today at the xc singletrack loop in my trail. This loop features mainly ups and downs with very little flats. Terrain consists of loose soil and some small-mid sized rocks.

    Being the first time doing SS on a trail, it was definitely not a WOW experience. There were many climbs where i could only slowly crank up my way or otherwise having to stop midway to push.

    With a rigid front, my body took alot of shocks. It was definitely a shocking experience though I thought the climbing felt more efficient than with a sus fork on my prev geared setup.

    My hands felt bashed at the end of the trail. Akin to having take the punches of some bully.

    Am now feeling nervous, and weary about tommorow's ride. Any tips or motivation? I know I will have to learn the smooth flow around the track but how the "smooth flow" may not turn out to be so smooth for a newly converted rigid SS rider.

    P.S: SS does feel great on the flats though!

    #1.
    http://www.beyondbikes.com/itemMatri...trixType=1&Av=

    #2.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...c+Fork+10.aspx

    I just put my SS back together with a rigid fork.
    SS, Rigid is alright, I get it, really efficient climbs, handles like a razor on the not to rough sections with no suspension maintenance.

    BUT nothing like a nice plush Fox or Rockshox with lock out to turn my SS machine into a competent downhiller as well.

  11. #11
    Stayin' Puft
    Reputation: canyonrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,240
    I rode front sus this year and recently converted back to rigid. A couple observations:

    - Other than picking your lines, the biggest thing for me was re-learning to get your weight back off the fork when hitting things. The fork is not going to "take care of that for you" like a sus fork will. You have to consciously de-weight wheels as they go over things, this requires a lot more attention to the terrain, not a point-and-shoot approach. I found with a sus fork I got in the habit of just pointing at things and not caring once I knew I could get away with it. Rigid fork does not allow that, you find out fast.

    - I don't get when people say grip loosely. For me, that would be a recipe for disaster. I find myself gripping tightly with my hands over bumpy stuff, but keeping my arms, elbows, and shoulders loose to act as the shock absorbers. A loose grip can't absorb much and could be dangerous. I did not set out to do it this way, just happened to notice that is what works for me.

    - Your body needs time to adapt to both SS and rigid riding. New muscles engaged, new forms of stress. Patience will pay off if you end up liking it. I sold my Fox F29 off this fall after owning it less than a year...it was like a set of crutches after an injury from a crash I had. But I am healthier now and it is no longer needed. Of course, ymmv... By time, I mean like a year or so to actually adapt to riding primarily SS. The rigid is a side factor, but depending on your core fitness might take a bit as well.

  12. #12
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Attacking climbs is definitely key on a ss. Considering you're stuck in one gear, the faster you pedal up the climb, the easier it will be(and the sooner it'll be over). On long flat sections, spin at an unmaintainable rate for 10 seconds, then coast, repeat. This will allow you to keep a high pace than just pedaling as fast as you can maintain.

    What canyonrat said above about grip is 100% correct for me as well.

    Rigid SS is much more of a full body workout than most other types of bikes, especially on rocky trails. You'll either get used to it or get a suspension fork.

    I like 35-45 psi in my tires on my rigid bike.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Slurry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    629
    Ergon grips - any flavor. Worlds of difference for me.

  14. #14
    achiever
    Reputation: redwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    929
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    I like 35-45 psi in my tires on my rigid bike.
    Have you tried lower pressures? I'm running only 20 in the rear, 18 in the front (on Conti Mountain King 2.4 29er) and it works very well, even on very rocky terrain. I only weigh 155, though. Asking because if I run much more, the bike gets all skittish and bounces around too much.

  15. #15
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    I've tried lower pressures and pinch flatted. I use the tendency of the bike to bounce off of obstacles to my benefit. I like going as fast as possible and jumping everything I see. Running lower pressures I 'feel' more rolling resistance, and have to be more cautious in tech. 35-45 in 29" tires allows me to hammer through the rocks and roots.

  16. #16
    nothing to see here
    Reputation: Stevob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,271
    Quote Originally Posted by lanpope
    Start early and attach climbs...recover on flats...repeat.

    Run your bars high-ish...keep weight back and hands loose...run low psi on fat front tire.

    Have fun.

    LP
    +1
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,142
    More often than not when i see pics of singlespeed or 29r terrain,especially 29er ss on trails, i say "yes i get it,ok if i rode there..." I was actually thinking of these ss pep talks today shortly after i grunted and growled my way through the last dozen pedal strokes in my 24-34 at wayway"rock"yonda here in rockjersey with half of them being hidden under wet leaves. If you are bored with suspension and gears by all means,go for it. I had one unintentional shift today thanks to a nice 1/2 inch+ stick wedged solidly between my chain and my deraileur, i actually had to break it in half to get it out,after which the chain went right back to where it was before ,no problem.

  18. #18
    Leg Shaver
    Reputation: Ike Turner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    546
    Dude. word to your mother for shouting out some honesty

    I live in socal. I got all MTB holistic n Shi# too. I built a SS rigid for all the peace and love it is. Then I took it out here on our trails. I got my ass beat for 1 year 6 months and said screw it. But long rolling terrain with damp soft grippy dirt we have not. Long ass climbs with sand and dust and boulders and drop off long ass rough descents we do have

    I was not nervous I was spent. I was more fit I blew doors on all my buds up hill, I learned better lines and handling skills. BUT Wrists and shoulders and low back got worked. Sure we have dudes who hammer these trails on ss rigid and they are uber fit etc. But spinning out in the dust at the top of a climb sucked balls. Actually it is rare to see a rigid here now. SS with Sup fork are abundant but gearing is like 32 21....but I cant remember the last time i saw a rigid here and I ride every friggn day just about.

    I like the look of the bike . I like the simplicity. But hammer till you puke and getting beat with soap in a sock in the kidneys killed my nirvana over time.

    So if you have rolling terrain with damp dirt go for what you know and get used to it.


    I run 100mm forks now and granny gear ratio and go out a lot early in the season to get me some sick fitness for the Road Crits but then hang it up till after I get fat during christmas
    Why are there so many threads about cheap ass bikes?

  19. #19
    conjoinicorned
    Reputation: ferday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,525
    swapping forks takes barely longer than changing rubber, no need to be one type or the other? i run both rigid and sus depending on the time of year and my interest level.
    the hardest thing IMO about rigid SS riding is there are no rests of any kind, up or down the trail. one mistake and it's gonna be painful.
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  20. #20
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by herbn
    More often than not when i see pics of singlespeed or 29r terrain,especially 29er ss on trails, i say "yes i get it,ok if i rode there..." I was actually thinking of these ss pep talks today shortly after i grunted and growled my way through the last dozen pedal strokes in my 24-34 at wayway"rock"yonda here in rockjersey with half of them being hidden under wet leaves. If you are bored with suspension and gears by all means,go for it. I had one unintentional shift today thanks to a nice 1/2 inch+ stick wedged solidly between my chain and my deraileur, i actually had to break it in half to get it out,after which the chain went right back to where it was before ,no problem.

    There have been plenty of rigid singlespeeds ridden at wayway, mahlon, ringwood, mooch and every other rocky haunt in dirty jersey, by many different riders, myself included.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,020
    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    swapping forks takes barely longer than changing rubber, no need to be one type or the other? i run both rigid and sus depending on the time of year and my interest level.
    the hardest thing IMO about rigid SS riding is there are no rests of any kind, up or down the trail. one mistake and it's gonna be painful.
    heck yeah... Its the only way to roll for the bike ADD types. I tend to go about 2 months on, 1 month off with my suspension fork.

  22. #22
    Retro Grouch
    Reputation: aka brad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,091
    Another way to take the edge off a rigid fork is to go tubeless.Most biked will work with a Stan's NoTubes kit and the result, for me anyway, was very noticeable. I also switched to 650b wheels (yeh I know a pricey upgrade) but the bigger wheels tend to stay rolling, rather then drop into ravines or stall over roots. Saying all that, I'm still a fan of variety. Picking up another crown race will allow you to switch forks without much hassle.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  23. #23
    WWYD?
    Reputation: johnnyb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,592
    My 2 cents: I found that staying back and using a shorter stem really took the weight off the hands and lets me "float" through the rough stuff. You're usually standing anyways, so if you can keep the weight over your feet, the hands don't suffer as much. Plus my hands rarely get numb anymore too.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGenTwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    286
    Im going for a ride now. Will try to take a pic of the kind of terrain we have here and try using some of the techniques again.

    Thanks all!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gatman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    578
    What is with all of this hate about needing to switch to a shock. That is not what he asked. And for those that say he needs gears, you are in the wrong place.

    Rigid is not for everyone. But, you need to give it a little time to get used to the different type of riding. I went rigid this year and I don't think I am any slower then I was with my shock on the front. I can be more beat up on a rough trail.

    I have to agree with the statements about holding on to the bars tighter. I actually grip the bars tighter rigid then I do with a shock on the front. But, you must keep your arms and shoulders loose.

    I am not familiar with the P2 fork, but I can tell you that forks can make a difference. I tried the surly 1x1 fork and it was ok, but I did not want to go rigid with it. I have since put a carbon Pace fork on there and love riding it. I never thought I would be able to ride rigid because my wrists hurt all the time. It is hard to believe, but they actually hurt less since I have been riding rigid then they did with a shock on there.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: traffic002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,938
    I bought my rigid ss 29-er for a winter bike. So far, it's been what I had hoped for and more. BUT, our local trails really hit the sweet spot. We have very tight, twisty, technical trails with wet roots and rocks. Once I dialed in the right size cog, the rest of just adapting to the rigid fork. I only weigh 165#, so I can set my tires to about 18-20psi. I used to bmx as a kid, so I'm used to dancing with my bike.

    Now...if I rode in SoCal, I don't think I would ride rigid. Lots of climbing, then bomb down bumpy trails. Not really a fun challenge.

    Recently I rode my Cannondale Rush on a ride that had about 800' mountainside where the trails go up and down all over it. So I took the geared FS bike.

    So...I found I could sit in the saddle on most of the terrain and bash into roots and rocks. I barely had to lift my butt off the saddle for the bigger bumps. I could bash my front tire onto obstacles about 12" high without even thinking about it.

    On the rigid, I'll pick up the front wheel and drop it on the back side of the root or rock. Or if there were 2, 3, 4 roots in a row, I would gather as much speed as I could and try to clear the whole section at once with one loft.

    As moose pointed out, it's a completely different riding style. Very involved. If you are not activily dancing with your bike, you will be frustrated...and quite beat up.

    I find that when I am in a fast group, I am near the head of the pack. Then I get a little tired and I quickly fall apart. Then I have to spend some time recovering toward the back of the pack for a while. Once tired, the rigid is NOT forgiving of mistakes.
    Just get out and ride!

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGenTwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    286
    Guys... yesterday's ride was AWESOME! Much better than my first ride. Seems like this "one will get better with every ride" is coming true for me, at least.

    I employed some of the techniques like holding my arms loosely and it actually worked. I think the best change i did to my bike was lowering the PSI of my front tire. it feels much better now.

    Climbs were also much better as I told myself to keep cranking up. Having some speed before the climbs really worked, too.

    Anyway. this are pics of one of the climbs inside(its not a really tough climb compared to what you guys have I guess)


    Still having a bigger problem with this one..


    Cant seem to build enough speed. Maybe Im just weak and need to do more riding.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hchchch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    125

    Rocky Roads: Rigid or Suspension?

    If you have roads like the one pictured below, would you ride rigid or suspension?

    Name:  Rocky-Mountain-Road.jpg
Views: 502
Size:  63.9 KB

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGenTwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    286
    I cant get a clear picture of the above portions of your picture. The lower parts seem to be similar to what we have here though.

    Im running rigid, btw. Or rather, trying it out.

  30. #30
    Feeling retro..but Jung
    Reputation: Germany_chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    223
    I have the same problems you do...looooong climbs..heart breaking literally...I am geared 33/17 and honestly when I get tired I just hike a bike gets the heart rate under control and I figure I'm not going any slower than I would in 22/32 (rationalization)...anyway keep the bidy loose like on a BMX let the bike move under you (in other words hold on and stay balanced)..really it's fun :0) in a weird way. the nice part about rigid ss is it conver to CX so easily...remember BMX...remember uphills is punk down (for me is punk) but more folk find a line and go not breaking much just sorta draging the brake...

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    I cant get a clear picture of the above portions of your picture. The lower parts seem to be similar to what we have here though.

    Im running rigid, btw. Or rather, trying it out.
    Keep at it. Keep your head down, grit your teeth and pedal. In 3 months you'll be flying up and down those hills and you'll be carved out of wood. With the bicep development you'll be taking fools to the gun show.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,142
    is this a trick question? where is the road going,somewhere with big drop offs? if it's just miles and miles of that, quite frankly a 29er would be the fastest,or maybe a cyclocrossbike. For some terrain ,maybe that street ,odd set ups might be very efficient,like if you took a 3 or 4 inch travel xc bike with alot of air pressure in the suspension and cyclocross tubular wheels.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    181
    I didn't find carbon bars to be much of a change when ridden with suspension. With a rigid, I feel a definite difference. Much less beat-up on the arms and tingling in the hands/wrists from trail chatter, but nothing lost in bike handling compared to a metal bar. If you're going to ride rigid, try them.

  34. #34
    I'm just messing with you
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,423
    Quote Originally Posted by Dion
    In 3 months you'll be flying up and down those hills and you'll be carved out of wood.
    Nothing makes a point quite like a Fight Club reference
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  35. #35
    Birdman aka JMJ
    Reputation: Birdman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,076

    Carved out of wood, indeed

    In 3 months you'll be flying up and down those hills and you'll be carved out of wood.

    He's right. After my first ride on my new rigid SS, I looked like this!

    Seriously, my first SS is a rigid Ti, my second "easy" SS is a steel hardtail. Love 'em both - just depends on how much suffering I feel like ladling out that day.

    JMJ
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGenTwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    286
    My 4th ride of running rigid...

    Seriously, Im starting to get the hang out of it. I still think the biggest improvement was in setting my tires at a lower pressure(though I dont recommend it for anyone to lower it below their minimum psi point). The climbs felt easier with every ride.

    And my body seems to be adapting to my new setup too, a friendly way of welcoming the bike after its initial displeasure...

    I just ordered a front 2.4 Mountain King which I believe will assist me in the jungle trail of my local track. Havent dared to try that trail with my current 2.0s.

    The feeling with rigid on flats.. awesome.. The raw feel of power transfer can be felt of the bike. Every strength goes to the bike and a greater connection between the rider and his/her bike has been established. A new confidence has overtaken me! Thanks guys!

  37. #37
    Life is Go0d!
    Reputation: mo0se's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    891
    Ignore the recommended low tire pressures on the tire.. mine say 45.. lol never gonna happen! I go 220 and run 25 in front, 30 rear.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,020
    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    Ignore the recommended low tire pressures on the tire.. mine say 45.. lol never gonna happen! I go 220 and run 25 in front, 30 rear.
    Agreed. I've ridden as low as 20 psi without problems, and I know others with really wide rims can go even lower

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGenTwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    Agreed. I've ridden as low as 20 psi without problems, and I know others with really wide rims can go even lower
    I wouldnt like it too low. Draggy...

    Still wondering what tire pressures to pump for my 2.4 contis.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: traffic002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,938
    What's this min pressure I keep hearing about? Is it the psi range on the tire and you're reading the lower number?

    Bah, recommended for street riding or high speed runs I suppose.

    I run as low as I can before pinching my tires. That generally translates to 18-25psi depending on the trail conditions. It's been wet lately so I've been running right around 19psi. Any less than 18psi and the tire moves too much and it's all mushy in the corners and over undulations.

    Keep at it! Sounds like you are feeling the benefits every ride.
    Just get out and ride!

  41. #41
    ss= 800 lb. gorilla
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    133
    i been mtb ing only 4 a year, and i only have had rigid, so i dont know any better..lol..but would a white brothers carbon rigid help, for a nice upgrade on my outcast? or maybe the karate monkey, even though the monkey seems 2 b the same fork, pretty much, as i have on the bike now.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    66
    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    Another way to take the edge off a rigid fork is to go tubeless.
    I think Ghetto tubeless is a great way to go. Use your existing wheels/tires (most likely) and for the price of two extra tubes and some Stan's, your in business. To me, the ride quality is so much nicer not to mention all of the other benefits covered. If you don't like it, dump the Stan's and go back - no problems! Besides, it's something else to work on in the garage when you're not out riding.
    Last edited by bigNslow; 11-04-2009 at 10:27 AM.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Quote Originally Posted by Birdman
    In 3 months you'll be flying up and down those hills and you'll be carved out of wood.

    He's right. After my first ride on my new rigid SS, I looked like this!

    Seriously, my first SS is a rigid Ti, my second "easy" SS is a steel hardtail. Love 'em both - just depends on how much suffering I feel like ladling out that day.

    JMJ
    Ha ha! I was thinking more like this (don't ask what's underneath)


  44. #44
    Life is Go0d!
    Reputation: mo0se's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    891
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    I wouldnt like it too low. Draggy...

    Still wondering what tire pressures to pump for my 2.4 contis.
    Everyone will be different.. but there is a sweet spot for everyone. Too little, and pinch flats happen, accompanied by the tire rolling over on the rim in corners. Too much, and you get a beating. Its trial and error.. take a floor pump with you to the trail, and if you are under 200, 20 to 22 is a good place to start.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  45. #45
    Plastic homer
    Reputation: Moval49er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    592
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    I wouldnt like it too low. Draggy...

    Still wondering what tire pressures to pump for my 2.4 contis.
    I didn't read closely enough to see if you noted your size, but I have set MKs up at 27 pounds rear 25 front tubeless, and I am 210 pounds. Could go lower, but you can start around there and decrease a couple pounds per ride until they get unacceptably squirmy.

    In fairness, my SS has a fork, and, like you, I am trying to figure out if the rigid thing is going to make me more amazing or more grumpy. The idea, after all, is to have fun and get exercise.

    Of course, I had the same indecision about SS, and now I need to do that every other ride - it is the best feeling in cycling.

    So - maybe a Bontrager 'Blade G2 in a month or two - oh, I don't know...

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    863
    I run the surly instigator fork with a gazzaloddi 3 inch tyre at about 15psi and i can ride most trails even sketchy downhills no problem.If my ride is more xc then i run a 2.2 on the front.I doubt i will go back to suspension now after riding rigid singlespeeds for about 2 years roughly.I does beat you up a little but its a good challenge and i like the clean looks and get on and ride aspect.I also like to mix some trials skills in my riding and that is alot easier with a rigid.

  47. #47
    ss= 800 lb. gorilla
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    133
    lifecycle, i couldnt agree more. the best looking rides, to me, are all ss, clean as hell, just the most basic bike. The first time my brother in law seen my bike, he asked me what the hell is that?? i told him, ah, just a bucket of nuts i bought on line!! funny, right? hes got a nice trek fuel, full floater, top end components,, but i thrash him every time we ride, and it makes him nuts. hes got speed, but i roost him on the climbs, and ive seen him miss gears when trying 2 get the right one 4 each particular hill. nuff said, ill keep my 4 hundred dollar "dog" woof woof!!

  48. #48
    Expert Crasher
    Reputation: GreenLightGo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    6,349
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    I wouldnt like it too low. Draggy...

    Still wondering what tire pressures to pump for my 2.4 contis.
    I ran my 2.4 Ardent at 19.5 psi this weekend up front, 25 psi out back in a Nano raptor. Both 29" tires mounted on Salsa Gordos - rigid bliss.
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGenTwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by razin cane
    lifecycle, i couldnt agree more. the best looking rides, to me, are all ss, clean as hell, just the most basic bike. The first time my brother in law seen my bike, he asked me what the hell is that?? i told him, ah, just a bucket of nuts i bought on line!! funny, right? hes got a nice trek fuel, full floater, top end components,, but i thrash him every time we ride, and it makes him nuts. hes got speed, but i roost him on the climbs, and ive seen him miss gears when trying 2 get the right one 4 each particular hill. nuff said, ill keep my 4 hundred dollar "dog" woof woof!!


    Time to spend the money for gears, on sweet crankset and CK hubs!

    Still, Im pondering whether to save up for a Surly 1x1 frame/fork or upgrading my current Commencal...

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hchchch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    125
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGenTwo
    I cant get a clear picture of the above portions of your picture. The lower parts seem to be similar to what we have here though.

    Im running rigid, btw. Or rather, trying it out.
    The entire trail is rocky like what you can see at the bottom of the picture. What do you call them? Baby heads?

    So if it's rocky like this all the way, will anyone ride rigid on this, especially on the downhill portions?

    Name:  IMG_1041.JPG
Views: 245
Size:  234.6 KB

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,020
    Quote Originally Posted by hchchch
    The entire trail is rocky like what you can see at the bottom of the picture. What do you call them? Baby heads?

    So if it's rocky like this all the way, will anyone ride rigid on this, especially on the downhill portions?

    Name:  IMG_1041.JPG
Views: 245
Size:  234.6 KB
    I understand why you're asking that question.. you want to know if it should be possible to use as a standard to live up to, or as validation of your idea about a trail, or something like that. But more important than any of that is if you can try it a bunch of times with a rigid fork and decide for yourself. I know that sounds cheesy, but even on smoother trails where lots of people enjoy riding rigid there are also lots of people who will never like rigid, so it doesn't depend on your trails. And that is fine because no one is required to like it, despite how many people seem to think its cooler

    On a more directly helpful note: take a second to think about it and compare to your current riding....
    How fast do you currently ride down that hill with a hardtail w/ suspension fork?
    Is one of your goals to still go just as fast, or are you ok with picking your way down the hill a bit slower? If you want to still go really fast you might find rigid too painful, although with good technique it might be acceptable for some.
    Do you legs and back currently feel beat up by the rocks? If you don't feel beat up then it isn't inconceivable that you can survive just fine with a rigid fork too
    Last edited by boomn; 11-04-2009 at 09:45 PM.

  52. #52
    Stayin' Puft
    Reputation: canyonrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,240
    Quote Originally Posted by hchchch
    The entire trail is rocky like what you can see at the bottom of the picture. What do you call them? Baby heads?

    So if it's rocky like this all the way, will anyone ride rigid on this, especially on the downhill portions?

    Name:  IMG_1041.JPG
Views: 245
Size:  234.6 KB
    <object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/ekQ_Ja02gTY&hl=en&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/ekQ_Ja02gTY&hl=en&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hchchch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    125
    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I understand why you're asking that question.. you want to know if it should be possible to use as a standard to live up to, or as validation of your idea about a trail, or something like that. But more important than any of that is if you can try it a bunch of times with a rigid fork and decide for yourself. I know that sounds cheesy, but even on smoother trails where lots of people enjoy riding rigid there are also lots of people who will never like rigid, so it doesn't depend on your trails. And that is fine because no one is required to like it, despite how many people seem to think its cooler
    Thanks for the advice. I'd love to try it with a rigid several times but I don't have my rigid SS rig yet.

    I've ordered a rigid SS and I'm contemplating about a suspension fork. As it takes forever for any component to be shipped here and pass customs, I'd like to order a suspension, if necessary, as early as possible before the weather turns foul. I'm itchin' to ride singlespeed and I don't want to discover that I need suspension, order it, then wait for the weather to be nice again, then try it out on these trails later next year.

    But then again, to each his own. I guess I will have to try it to really know if I need it. And I could always ride other trails... Thanks for the insight.

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,020
    Quote Originally Posted by hchchch
    Thanks for the advice. I'd love to try it with a rigid several times but I don't have my rigid SS rig yet.

    I've ordered a rigid SS and I'm contemplating about a suspension fork. As it takes forever for any component to be shipped here and pass customs, I'd like to order a suspension, if necessary, as early as possible before the weather turns foul. I'm itchin' to ride singlespeed and I don't want to discover that I need suspension, order it, then wait for the weather to be nice again, then try it out on these trails later next year.

    But then again, to each his own. I guess I will have to try it to really know if I need it. And I could always ride other trails... Thanks for the insight.
    Glad to help

    I just edited that post to add more hopefully helpful questions.

  55. #55
    Plastic homer
    Reputation: Moval49er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    592
    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I understand why you're asking that question.. you want to know if it should be possible to use as a standard to live up to, or as validation of your idea about a trail, or something like that. But more important than any of that is if you can try it a bunch of times with a rigid fork and decide for yourself. I know that sounds cheesy, but even on smoother trails where lots of people enjoy riding rigid there are also lots of people who will never like rigid, so it doesn't depend on your trails. And that is fine because no one is required to like it, despite how many people seem to think its cooler
    Really, really true. Find what you love and do it.

    SS seems to require some level of compliance with zaniness, toughness, etc. around here.

    The best thing about SS to me is it feels like kindergarten, when I learned to ride my AMF Roadmaster 24". It was my way out of the house, my way to the bluegills, my way to the woods, my '57 Chevy, my hunting truck, my work truck ( paper boy). My Superfly SS gives that back.

    Do the fork you want - life is just too damn short to be meeting someone else's goals when you are supposed to be screwing off.

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    77

    Strengthen the core

    You'll find that riding a rigid SS will make you strong. Assuming you ride hills that is.

    Work on your core strength and it will pay dividends.

    Whenever people question me about why I would run a rigid SS. I just tell them that I'm not that smart so never having to worry about gears or damping / rebound is right up my alley.

    The funny thing is, I'm smarter than them all. That's why I ride a SS rigid El Mariachi.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: traffic002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,938
    Quote Originally Posted by razin cane
    lifecycle, i couldnt agree more. the best looking rides, to me, are all ss, clean as hell, just the most basic bike. The first time my brother in law seen my bike, he asked me what the hell is that?? i told him, ah, just a bucket of nuts i bought on line!! funny, right? hes got a nice trek fuel, full floater, top end components,, but i thrash him every time we ride, and it makes him nuts. hes got speed, but i roost him on the climbs, and ive seen him miss gears when trying 2 get the right one 4 each particular hill. nuff said, ill keep my 4 hundred dollar "dog" woof woof!!
    So it seems that there are some folks that are somehow drawn to the rigid/ss bikes (29-er flavor of course) and in a short amount of time, they are keeping up with if not surpassing their FS/geared buddies.

    Now, only on a narrow range of trails (which we happen to ride a lot) I am in my sweet spot and I can pretty much punish the geared/fs crowd. ESPECIALLY if it is wet with nasty roots. They are so used to bashing into roots and rocks, when the traction goes away, they flail around while I don't skip a beat.

    It isn't for everyone. If you just want to get out and stay in the group ride, then I would not recommend it. You want to go faster when others want to slow down and vice a versa. So it's less social unless you ride it that way. But if you're out to challenge yourself and improve your skills and fitness even more, then it's great.
    Just get out and ride!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.